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THE

TECHNICAL REPOSITORY,

CONTAINING

practical Enfonuattoit . .

ON SUBJKCTS CONNECTED WITH

DISCOVERIES AND IMPROVEMENTS

IN THE

USEFUL ARTS.

BY THOMAS GILL, Patent-Agent,

UPWARDS OF TWENTY YEARS A CHAIRMAN OF THE COMMITTEE

OF MECHANICS IN THE SOCIETY FOR THE ENCOURAGEMENT OF ARTS,

MANUFACTURES, AND COMMERCE, ADELPHI,

AND HONORARY MEMBER OF THE ROYAL PRUSSIAN ECONOMICAL

SOCIETY OF POTSDAM.

VOL. X.

LONDON:

PRINTED BT

T. AND J. B. FLINDELL, 67, ST. MARTIN'S-LANE;

Edited At No. 125, Strand;

PUBLISHED BY T. CADELL, STRAND;

AND SOlD BY

Slattkr and Monday, Oxford; Deiohtons, Cambridge; Blackwood, Edin-
burgh; M'phun, Glasgow; Brown and Co., Aberdeen; Cuhmino, Dublin;
Buloin, Bristol; Beilby, Knotts, and Co., Birmingham; Robinsons, Li-
verpool; Uphah, Exeter; Barratts, Bath; Robinsons, Leeds; Thuttel and
Wurtz, Paris and Strasburg.

And by other principal Booksellers and Newsmen.

1827.

[graphic]

THE

TECHNICAL REPOSITORY.

I.—On the Hydrostatic Blow-pipe, as now used in the Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania. By the inventor, R. Hare, M.D. Professor of Chemistry, &c.*

WITH A FIGURE.

The following passage is quoted from a memoir on the supply and application of the blow-pipe, which I published in 1802:—

"The blow-pipe is, on many occasions, a useful instrument to the artist, and philosopher. By the former, it is used for the purpose of enamelling, to soften or solder small pieces of metal, and for the fabrication of glass instruments; while the latter, can, by means of it, in a few minutes, subject small portions of any substance to intense heat; and is thus enabled to judge of the advantage to be gained, and the method to be pursued, in operations on a larger scale. It is by means of the blow-pipe, that glass tubes are most conveniently exposed to the heat necessary to mould them into the many forms occasionally required, for philosophical purposes; and by the various application of tubes, thus moulded, ingenuity is often enabled to surmount'the want of apparatus; which is the greatest obstacle to the attainment of skill, in experimental philosophy.

"To all the purposes which I have mentioned, the blowpipe is fully adequate, when properly supplied with air,

* From the Franklin Journal, for March, 1826; a new work just commenced, editing hy Dr. Thomas P. Jones, Professor of Mechanics in the Franklin Institute of Philadelphia, and of which work, our original articles "On Iron and Steel" form a rery considerable portion.—Ebitor.

Tech. Rep. Vol. X. B

S

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