A Text-book of Pharmacology, Therapeutics and Materia Medica

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Contents

GASI ME PP 4387
43
Relations of Motion and Oxidation
51
CatalysisFermentationInorganic Ferments
58
Ai tha
61
Zymogens
65
Action of Drugs on the Nora R
68
Dovrlopment and Grewah of B lumewe on Antlempties of the Solvent
78
ACTION OF DRUGS ON INVERTEBRATA pp 8894
88
CHAPTER V
95
Contracture
101
Massage
107
Effect of Stimuli
113
ACTION OF DRUGS ON NERVES pp 119128
119
Paralysis of Motor NerveEndings by Drugs
125
Action of Drugs on Reflex Action
133
Interference in Nervous Structures
139
Stimulating Action of Drugs on the Reflex Powers of the Cord
147
Indias Burze mi
150
Depressant Action of Drugs on Motor Centres in the Brain
155
Drugs which Lessen the Functional Activity of the Brain
163
Hypnotics or Soporifics
164
Adjuncts to Anodynes
170
Mode of Administering Anästhetics
177
CHAPTER IX
184
Application of Drugs to the Eye 420
187
Uses of Mydriatics and Myotics
191
CHAPTER X
197
Action of Drugs on the
205
Pulmonary Sedatives
211
Arteries and Vains
221
Bloodpressure
222
Mode of Ascertaining the Blooipressure 927
228
Efect of the iteruies in Prise res
234
Action of Drugs on Vasomotor and Vasodilating Nerves
242
Action of Drugs in samutor mi sülacing Terres
243
Influence of Nerves on Bloodpressure
248
Iztuence of Verres in Biwiarsens
251
Action of Drugs on the Cardioinhibitory Action of the Vagus
254
Differences Between the Heart Apex and the Heart
266
Drugs which Act on the Vagus Centre
273
General Considerations regarding the Heart
280
Cardiac Stimulants
286
Risks Attending the Administration of Digitalis and other Cardiac Tonics
292
Risks Attending the Administration of Digitalis and other Carliae Tonics
293
Rubefacients
301
CHAPTER XIII
308
Refrigerants
315
Antacids
321
Gastrie Sedatives and Antieluriius
327
Constipation
335
Antinom
343
Uses of Purgatives
344
Hepatic Stimulants
352
CHAPTER XIV
359
AntipyreticsFebrifuges
365
Circumstances Modifying the Secretion of Urine
374
Adjuvants to Diuretics
381
Antihydrotics or Anhydrotics
387
Vasomotor
393
Aphrodisiacs
395
CHAPTER XVII
402
Cold Pack
407
Medicated Baths
413
Objections to Hypodermic Injections
419
MasticatoriesGargles
425
CHAPTER XIX
434
CHAPTER XXI
441
ElixiriaElixirs
447
Phosphoric
505
Boric or Boracic Acid
508
Arsenious vide p 646
516
Metals of the Alkalis Their Characters and Reactions
522
Comparative Action of the Alkaline Dietals
528
Characters Action and Uses of Officinal Potash Salts 533548
533
Sodium General Sources and Reactions of its Salts 518
549
Lithium Sources Reactions Impurities and Tests of its Salts
561
Characters Actions and Uses of Officinal Ammonium Salts 567574
567
CHAPTER XXV
573
Characters Action and Uses of Officinal Lime Salts 578585
578
Group I Appendix Aluminium
585
CHAPTER XXVI
593
Copper its Sources Reactions Impurities and Tests
604
Group IV Mercury
610
Characters Actions and Uses of Officinal Salts of Mercury 616627
616
Tetrad Metals Lead and Tin
627
Tin Action and Uses of its Chloride
634
Uses of Phosphorus
640
Characters Actions and Uses of Officinal Preparations of Arsenic 646648
646
Characters Action and Uses of its Officinal Preparations 654657
654
CHAPTER XXVIII
661
Manganese
678
CHAPTER XXIX
685
Methyl Alcohol
691
Causes and Treatment of Alcoholism
697
Aldehydes Ethylaldehyde and Paraldehyde
703
Simple Ethers Ether 704707
704
Nitroglycerine
712
Bromal Hydrate
718
Precautions in using Chloroform
724
CHAPTER XXX
730
Its Action
736
Naphthalin
742
Ranunculacea
748
Mamoleaceae
756
Violaceae
782
Malvaceae
788
Sterculiaceĉ Byttneriacea
796
Meliaceae
802
Simarubaceĉ
808
Rhamnaceae
809
Rosaceacontinued PAGE
830
Myrtaceae
837
Umbelliferĉ
845
Caprifoliaceae
853
Caprifoliaceae
868
Lobeliaceae
876
Oleaceae
881
Convolvulaceĉ
895
Scrophulariaceae
908
EXOGENE SUBClass IV APETALĈ pp 923948
923
Aristolochiacea
932
Salicaceĉ
938
Urticaceae
944
CHAPTER XXXVI
957
Orchidaceae
969
CHAPTER XXXVII
978
Alge
984
Class Aves
995
Class Annelida
1003
GENERAL INDEX
1009
276
1013
Prezatica cze CD
1027
Stanniuss Experiments
1037
INDEX OF DISEASES AND REMEDIES
1079
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL INDEX
1119

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Page 183 - As nitrous oxide in its extensive operation appears capable of destroying physical pain, it may probably be used with advantage during surgical operations in which no great effusion of blood takes place.
Page 29 - The irrational practice of giving infinitesimal doses has of course nothing to do with the principle of homoeopathy — similia similibus curantur: the only requisite is that mentioned by Hippocrates, when he recommended mandrake in mania ; viz. that the dose be smaller than would be sufficient to produce in a healthy man symptoms similar to those of the disease.
Page iii - Assistant Physician and Lecturer on Materia Medica at St. Bartholomew's Hospital ; Examiner in Materia Medica in the University of London, in the Victoria University, and in the Royal College of Physicians, London ; late Examiner in the University of Edinburgh. A TEXT-BOOK OF PHARMACOLOGY, THERAPEUTICS, AND MATERIA MEDICA. Adapted to the United States Pharmacopoeia, by FRANCIS H.
Page 499 - Acid, be put into a small flask with a few pieces of Granulated Zinc, and, while the effervescence continues, a slip of bibulous paper wetted with...
Page 777 - Add the oil of orange, to the cotton in small portions at a time, distributing it thoroughly by picking the cotton apart after each addition ; then pack...
Page 342 - ... reaches the rectum and produces purgation. 6. Purgation will not ensue if water be withheld from the diet for one or two days previous to the administration of the salt in a concentrated form. 7. The absence of purgation is not due to the want of water in the alimentary canal, but to its deficiency in the blood. 8. Under ordinary conditions, with an unrestricted supply of water, the maximal amount of fluid accumulated within the canal corresponds very nearly to the quantity of water required...
Page 694 - The action of nitrite of amyl in causing flushing was first observed by Guthrie, and Dr. BW Richardson recommended it as a remedy in spasmodic conditions, from the power he thought it to possess of paralysing motor nerves. In the spring of 1867 I had opportunities of constantly observing a patient who suffered from angina pectoris, and of obtaining from him numerous sphygmographic tracings, both during the attack and during the interval. These showed that during the attack the pulse became quicker,...
Page 943 - Characters and Tests. — Pale grey, amorphous, without smell, but, even in the most minute quantity, powerfully irritating the nostrils ; strongly and persistently bitter, and highly acrid; insoluble in water, soluble in spirit, in ether, and in diluted acids, leaving traces of an insoluble brown resinoid matter.
Page 549 - Characters and Tests. — In transparent colourless rhombic prisms, terminated by four converging planes, efflorescent, tasting like common salt. It imparts a yellow colour to flame. Its solution has a faintly alkaline reaction, it gives a yellow precipitate with nitrate of silver, the resulting fluid acquiring an acid reaction. Heated to dull redness it loses...
Page 879 - ... powder, sweetish in odour, acrid in the throat, easily soluble in rectified spirit, but only partially so in ether, and insoluble in oil of turpentine.

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