An Enquiry Into the Duties of the Female Sex

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A. Strahan, 1801 - Conduct of life - 448 pages
 

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Page 442 - For he that will love life, and see good days, let him refrain his tongue from evil, and his lips that they speak no guile: let him eschew evil, and do good ; let him seek peace and ensue it.
Page 140 - Whose adorning, let it not be that outward adorning of plaiting the hair, and of wearing of gold, or of putting on of apparel; but let it be the hidden man of the heart, in that which is not corruptible, even the orna-ment of a meek and quiet spirit, which is in the sight of God of great price.
Page 24 - I have observed among all nations, that the women ornament themselves more than the men ; that, wherever found, they are the same kind, civil, obliging, humane, tender beings; that they are ever inclined to be gay and cheerful, timorous and modest.
Page 240 - For the hufband is the head of the wife, even as Chrift is the head of the church : and he is the Saviour of the body.
Page 392 - Johnson, upon all occasions, expressed his approbation of enforcing instruction by means of the rod. "I would rather [said he] have the rod to be the general terror to all, to make them learn, than tell a child, if you do thus, or thus, you will be more esteemed than your brothers or sisters. The rod produces an effect which terminates in itself. A child is afraid of being whipped, and gets his task, and there's an end on't; whereas, by exciting emulation and comparisons of superiority, you lay the...
Page 442 - For the eyes of the Lord are over the righteous, and his ears are open to their prayers : but the face of the Lord is against them that do evil.
Page 24 - Tartar ; if hungry, dry, cold, wet, or fick, the " women have ever been friendly to me, and uniformly
Page 229 - Thus a habit is formed — a habit at first, perhaps, of limited indulgence — but a habit that is continually found more formidable and more encroaching. The appetite becomes too keen to be denied ; and in proportion as it is more urgent, grows less nice and select in its fare. What would formerly have given offence now gives none.
Page 21 - ... needful ; — these and other studies, pursuits, and occupations, assigned chiefly or entirely to men, demand the efforts of a mind endued with the powers of close and comprehensive reasoning, and of intense and continued application in a degree in which they are not requisite for the discharge of the customary offices of female duty. It would therefore seem natural to expect, and experience I think confirms the justice of the expectation, that the Giver...
Page 376 - if any provide not for his own, < and efpecially for thofe of his own " houfe, he hath denied the faith, and is

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