Higher Arithmetic: Designed for the Use of High Schools, Academies, and Colleges ... with an Appendix

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D. Appleton and Company, 1849 - Arithmetic - 342 pages
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Page 194 - Multiply the divisor, thus augmented, by the last figure of the root, and subtract the product from the dividend, and to the remainder bring down the next period for a new dividend.
Page 39 - Multiply all the numerators together for a new numerator, and all the denominators together for a new denominator.
Page 311 - That is, the square of the sum of two numbers is equal to the square of the first number, plus twice the product of the two numbers, plus the square of the second number.
Page 134 - If the payment be less than the interest, the surplus of interest must not be taken to augment the principal; but interest continues on the former principal until the period when the payments, taken together, exceed the interest due...
Page 17 - ... any number divided by 9 will leave the same remainder as the sum of its digits divided by 9.
Page 134 - The rule for casting interest, when partial payments have been made, is to apply the payment, in the first place, to the discharge of the interest then due. " If the payment exceeds the interest, the surplus goes towards discharging the principal, and the subsequent interest is to be computed on the balance of principal remaining due.
Page 178 - To raise a whole number or a decimal to any power, use it as a factor as many times as there are units in the exponent.
Page 249 - His head weighed as much as his tail and half his body, and his body weighed as much as his head and tail together. What was the weight of the fish ? Let 2x = the weight of the body in pounds.
Page 323 - That is, the cube of the sum of two quantities is equal to the cube of the first, plus three times the square of the first...
Page 41 - Then multiply each numerator by all the denominators, except its own, for a new numerator, and all the denominators together for a common denominator.

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