The Repository, Volume 1

Front Cover
W.H. Starr & Company, 1858 - New London (Conn.)
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 185 - Lives of great men all remind us We can make our lives sublime, And, departing, leave behind us Footprints on the sands of time; Footprints, that perhaps another, Sailing o'er life's solemn main, A forlorn and shipwrecked brother, Seeing, shall take heart again.
Page 6 - Providence, that woman, who is the mere dependent and ornament of man in his happier hours, should be his stay and solace when smitten with sudden calamity ; winding herself into the rugged recesses of his nature, tenderly supporting the drooping head, and binding up the broken heart I was once congratulating u friend, who had around him a blooming family, knit together in the strongest affection.
Page 153 - I heard a shout. Starting, and looking half round, I saw the lion just in the act of springing upon me. I was upon a little height; he caught my shoulder as he sprang, and we both came to the ground below together. Growling horribly close to my ear, he shook me as a terrier dog does a rat. The shock produced a stupor similar to that which seems to be felt by a mouse after the first shake of the cat.
Page 6 - I HAVE often had occasion to remark the fortitude with which women sustain the most overwhelming reverses of fortune. Those disasters which break down the spirit of a man , and prostrate him in the dust, seem to call forth all the energies of the softer sex, and give such intrepidity and elevation to their character, that at times it approaches to sublimity.
Page 121 - For thee, O dear, dear Country, mine eyes their vigils keep ; For very love, beholding thy happy name, they weep. The mention of thy glory is unction to the breast, And medicine in sickness, and love, and life, and rest.
Page 148 - Give a man this taste and a means of gratifying it, and you can hardly fail of making a happy man, unless indeed, you put into his hands a most perverse selection of books. "You place him in contact with the best society in every period of history; with the wisest, the wittiest, with the tenderest, the bravest, and the purest characters who have adorned humanity. " You make him a denizen of all nations, a contemporary of all ages. The world has been created for him.
Page 118 - Oh, the grave ! the grave ! It buries every error, covers every defect, extinguishes every resentment ! From its peaceful bosom spring none but fond regrets and tender recollections.
Page 153 - Growling horribly close to my ear, he shook me as a terrier dog does a rat. The shock produced a stupor similar to that which seems to be felt by a mouse after the first shake of the cat It caused a sort of dreaminess, in which there was no sense of pain or feelr ing of terror, though quite conscious of all that was happening.
Page 6 - As the vine, which has long twined its graceful foliage about the oak, and been lifted by it into sunshine, will, when the hardy plant is rifted by...
Page 148 - Give a man this taste, and the means of gratifying it, and you can hardly fail of making him a happy man; unless, indeed, you put into his hands a most perverse selection of books.

Bibliographic information