History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent, Volume 3

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Contents

CHAPTER V
361
American Standing Army proposed 364 Plan of taxing America
364
Ministry Incomplete 372 Affair of Wilkes 372 Whately 373 Jackson
373
Fort Pitt threatened 379 Loss of Fort Miami 380 Of Fort
385
The King rejects Pitts Advice 391 Retreat of Bute 391 Bedford joins
392
Boston Instructions 420 Excitement at New York 420 The Legislature
426
tion of the New Provinces 429 Canada 429 Vermont 431 Spirit of
435
of Authority 440 His Interview with Franklin 440 Soame Jenyns on
443
tions against it 449 The Stamp Act passes 451 Receives the Royal Assent
451
THE MINISTRY OFFEND
457
Progress of Freedom p 466 News of the StampTax reaches America
467
Action of Virginia 468 Patrick Henry 468 Meeting of the Massachusetts
474
Rockingham 486 Burke 487 Grafton and Conway 488 Dartmouth
486
Master forced to resign 493 Riot at Boston 494 General Resignation of
499
AMERICA REASONS AGAINST THE STAMP ACT ROCKINGHAMS ADMINISTRA
500
Samuel Adams enters the Legislature 506 Events in New York
506
Union 510 The English take possession of Ilinois 510 Colonization
515
First of November 519 The Press 520 Events in New York 521
524
bate in the House of Lords 529 In the Commons 531 Progress of American
535
Grafton and Conway desire to see Pitt at the Head of the Gov
551
vises to enforce the Stamp Act 559 The Division 560 Mansfield and Rous
564
House of Lords 567 It is reversed in the House of Commons 568
570
The Repeal resolved upon 574 Opinions of Scotland
576
cries for Freedom and Equality 578 Bland of Virginia finds a Remedy
588
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Page 359 - Britain; and that the King's Majesty, by and with the advice and consent of the Lords spiritual and temporal and Commons of Great Britain in Parliament assembled, had, hath and of right ought to have, full power and authority to make laws and statutes of sufficient force and validity to bind the colonies and people of America, subjects of the Crown of Great Britain in all cases whatsoever.
Page 547 - At the same time let the sovereign authority of this country over the colonies be asserted in as strong terms as can be devised, and be made to extend to every point of legislation, that we may bind their trade, confine their manufactures, and exercise every power whatsoever, except that of taking their money out of their pockets without their consent.
Page 425 - The hand that rounded Peter's dome And groined the aisles of Christian Rome Wrought in a sad sincerity; Himself from God he could not free; He builded better than he knew; The conscious stone to beauty grew.
Page 103 - Whose dominion is an everlasting dominion, and his kingdom is from generation to generation. And all the inhabitants of the earth are reputed as nothing; and he doeth according to his will in the armies of heaven, and among the inhabitants of the earth...
Page 439 - I always consider the settlement of America with reverence and wonder, as the opening of a grand scene and design in Providence for the illumination of the ignorant, and the emancipation of the slavish part of mankind all over the earth.
Page 222 - The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power, And all that beauty, all that wealth e'er gave, Await alike the inevitable hour: The paths of glory lead but to the grave.
Page 547 - Upon the whole, I will beg leave to tell the House what is really my opinion. It is that the Stamp Act be repealed absolutely, totally, and immediately; that the reason for the repeal be assigned, because it was founded upon an erroneous principle.
Page 296 - ... at plough. Secondly, These laws also ought to be designed for no other end ultimately, but the good of the people. Thirdly, They must not raise taxes on the property of the people, without the consent of the people, given by themselves or their deputies.
Page 309 - tis rough and narrow, And winds with short turns down the precipice ; And in its depth there is a mighty rock, Which has, from unimaginable years, Sustained itself with terror and with toil Over a gulf, and with the agony With which it clings seems slowly coming down...
Page 546 - I was at pains to collect, to digest, to consider them ; and I will be bold to affirm, that the profits to Great Britain from the trade of the colonies, through all its branches, is two millions a year. This is the fund that carried you triumphantly through the last war, The estates that were rented at two thousand pounds a year, threescore years ago, are at three thousand pounds at present. Those estates sold then from fifteen to eighteen years purchase; the same may now be sold for thirty.

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