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12. Synæresis (cùv-aipéw). Contraction of two syl

lables into one: e. g. “deest," "alveo," &c. This process is sometimes called Synecphonesis

or Synizēsis. 13. Synalæphal (oùv-ådelow). The elision of the vowel

at the end of a word before a vowel at the beginning of the next: e.g. "Phyllida amo ante

alias." 14. Syncope (ovv-ków). Cutting out a letter in the

middle of a word and drawing the pieces together: e.g." vinelum," "poclum," &c. (Aids

VIII. a.) 15. Systole (oùv-oté). The shortening of a syllable

naturally long, as “ stětěrunt,” “constitěrunt,”

" deděrunt," &c. (Aids viii. b.) 16. Tmēsis (réuvw). Cutting one word into two: e. g.

“quæ loca cunque," for "quæcunque loca;" "septemque triones," for "septentriones." Part I. Exercise XXI. line 5, note.

one.

B. SYNTAX. 1. Anadiplosis ; by which the same word is made to begin a sentence which concluded the preceding

See Poet. Orn. §. 1. Cf. Virg. Ecl. vi. 20; viii. 55. Horace, C. iii. 3. 60. 2. Anaphora ; by which the same word is repeated at

the beginning of successive sentences. Poet. Orn. 8.2. Part I. Exercise CXXIII. 5, 6. Cf. Virg. Ecl. i. 39. Horace, C. i. 15. 9. Ovid,

Ep. ex Ponto. ii. 6. 19. 3. Antithesis ; by which opposite conceptions are

contrasted : e.g. Ov. Heroid. xv. 20.“ Improbe,

Observe that the vowel is sometimes, though rarely, not elided : c.g. “Ter sunt conati imponere Pelio Ossan.” This is called Hiatus. Cf. Virg. Æn. iii. 211.

multarum quod fuit, unus habes.” Cf. Hor. C. ii. 15. 13. It belongs chiefly to epigrams, or

playful poetry. 4. Apostrophe; by which persons, or inanimate ob

jects, are addressed in order to add force or pathos. See Aids vi. Part I. Exercises V. LI. LII. CVII. &c. Cf. Virg. An. ii. 59. Ov.

Met. x. 41; Fasti iv. 439. 5. Aposiopēsis; by which the latter part of a sentence

is passionately and abruptly broken off. Virg. Æn. i. 135, “Quos ego-sed motos præstat," &c. &c. Ov. Her. xii. 207, “Quos equidem

actutum !-sed quid,” &c. 6. Apposition; by which a subordinate definition is

added to a substantive, not necessarily forming one idea with it, but serving to define or characterize it more closely: e. g.“ Tarquinius, rex Romanorum.” “Effodiuntur opes, irritamenta malorum,” Ov. M. i. 140. Cf. Part I. Exercises

V.1; LVI. 1. 4; XCI. 4. 7. Asynděton; by which conjunctions are omitted :

Virg. Æn. i. 602, “Urbe, domo socias." Ov.
Fast. i. 126, "It, redit officio Jupiter ipse suo."
Cf. Part I. Exercise IV. 16; XXXIX. 6;

LXXVIII. 4. Part II. LVI. 6. 8. Attraction ; by which (a) the Relative is drawn

into the case of the Antecedent: e.g. Hor. Sat. i. 6. 15, “ Judice quo nôsti, populo.” This however is rare. Cf. Terence. Heaut. i. 1. 35. "Hâc quidem causâ quâ dixi tibi.”—Cicero, Ep. ad Div. v. 14.—Or (6) the Antecedent is drawn into the Relative clause. E.g. Hor. Epod. ii. 37. “Quis non malarum quas amor curas habet Hæc inter obliviscitur?" Cf. Sat. ii. 2. 59. Virg. Æn. i, 573,-0v. Met. xiv. 350.- Terence

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12. Synæresis (oùv-aipéw). Contraction of two syllables into one: e. g.

deest,” “alveo,” &c. This process is sometimes called Synecphonēsis

or Synizēsis. 13. Synalæphal (oùv-ådelow). The elision of the vowel

at the end of a word before a vowel at the beginning of the next: e.g. "Phyllida amo ante

alias." 14. Syncope (oùv-kórtw). Cutting out a letter in the

middle of a word and drawing the pieces together: e.g.“vinclum," "poclum,” &c. (Aids

VIII. a.) 15. Systole (oùv-otéw). The shortening of a syllable

naturally long, as "stětěrunt," "constitěrunt," "

“ deděrunt," &c. (Aids viii. b.) 16. Tmēsis (réuvw). Cutting one word into two: e. g.

loca cunque,” for “quæcunque loca;" “septemque triones," for "septentriones." Part I. Exercise XXI. line 5, note.

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quæ

one.

B. SINTAX. 1. Anadiplosis; by which the same word is made to begin a sentence which concluded the preceding

See Poet. Orn. &. 1. Cf. Virg. Ecl. vi. 20; viii. 55. Horace, C. iii. 3. 60. 2. Anaphöra ; by which the same word is repeated at

the beginning of successive sentences. Poet. Orn. $. 2. Part I. Exercise CXXIII. 5, 6. Cf. Virg. Ecl. i. 39. Horace, C. i. 15. 9. Ovid,

Ep. ex Ponto. ii. 6. 19. 3. Antithesis ; by which opposite conceptions are

contrasted : e. g. Ov. Heroid. xv. 20.“ Improbe,

* Observe that the vowel is sometimes, though rarely, not elided : c.g. “Ter sunt conati imponere Pelio Ossan.” This is called Hiatus. Cf. Virg. Æn. iii. 211.

multarum quod fuit, unus habes.” Cf. Hor. C. ü. 15. 13. It belongs chiefly to epigrams, or

playful poetry. 4. Apostrophe; by which persons, or inanimate ob

jects, are addressed in order to add force or pathos. See Aids vi. Part I. Exercises V. LI. LII. CVII. &c. Cf. Virg. Æn. ii. 59. Ov.

Met. x. 41; Fasti iv. 439. 5. Aposiopēsis ; by which the latter part of a sentence

is passionately and abruptly broken off. Virg. Æn. i. 135, “ Quos ego-sed motos præstat," &c. &c. Ov. Her. xii. 207, “ Quos equidem

actutum !-sed quid,” &c. 6. Apposition ; by which a subordinate definition is

added to a substantive, not necessarily forming one idea with it, but serving to define or characterize it more closely : e. g. "Tarquinius, rex Romanorum.” “Effodiuntur opes, irritamenta malorum,” Ov. M. i. 140. Cf. Part I. Exercises

V.1; LVI. 1. 4; XCI. 4. 7. Asynděton ; by which conjunctions are omitted :

Virg. Æn. i. 602, “ Urbe, domo socias.” Ov.
Fast. i. 126, “ It, redit officio Jupiter ipse suo."
Cf. Part I. Exercise IV. 16; XXXIX. 6;

LXXVIII. 4. Part II. LVI. 6. 8. Attraction; by which (a) the Relative is drawn

into the case of the Antecedent: e.g. Hor. Sat. i. 6. 15, “ Judice quo nôsti, populo." This however is rare. Cf. Terence. Heaut. i. 1. 35. “Hâc quidem causâ quâ dixi tibi.”—Cicero, Ep. ad Div. v. 14.—Or (6) the Antecedent is drawn into the Relative clause. E. g. Hor. Epod. ii. 37. “Quis non malarum quas amor curas habet Hæc inter obliviscitur?" Cf. Sat. ii. 2. 59. Virg. Æn. i, 573,- Ov. Met. xiv. 350.- Terence

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12. Synarčsis (güv-aipéw). Contraction of two syllables into one: e. g.

deest,” “alveo,” &c. This process is sometimes called Synecphonēsis

or Synizēsis. 13. Synalæphal (ovv-údelow). The elision of the vowel

at the end of a word before a vowel at the beginning of the next: e. g. “Phyllida amo ante

alias.” 14. Syncope (oùv-ków). Cutting out a letter in the

middle of a word and drawing the pieces together : e.g." vinclum," "poclum," &c. (Aids

VIII. a.) 15. Systole (ovv-oté.w). The shortening of a syllable

naturally long, as "stětěrunt," "constitěrunt,"

“ deděrunt," &c. (Aids viii. b.) 16. Tmēsis (Téuvw). Cutting one word into two: e. g.

“ quæ loca cunque,” for “quæcunque loca;" "septemque triones," for "septentriones." Part I. Exercise XXI. line 5, note.

one.

B. SINTAX. 1. Anadiplosis; by which the same word is made to begin a sentence which concluded the preceding

See Poet. Orn. §. 1. Cf. Virg. Ecl. vi. 20; viii. 55. Horace, C. iii. 3. 60. 2. Anaphora ; by which the same word is repeated at

the beginning of successive sentences. Poet. Orn. $. 2. Part I. Exercise CXXIII. 5, 6. Cf. Virg. Ecl. i. 39. Horace, C. i. 15. 9. Ovid,

Ep. ex Ponto. ii. 6. 19. 3. Antithèsis ; by which opposite conceptions are

contrasted: e. g. Ov. Heroid. xv. 20. “Improbe,

* Observe that the vowel is sometimes, though rarely, not elided : c.g. “Ter sunt conati imponere Pelio Ossan.” This is called Hiatus. Cf. Virg. Æn. iii. 211.

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