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Books Books 1 - 10 of 30 on ... of any gradual diminution of the size — of such species, but is the result....
" ... of any gradual diminution of the size — of such species, but is the result of circumstances which may be illustrated by the fable of the " Oak and the Reed ;" the smaller and feebler animals have bent and accommodated themselves to changes to which... "
The Annual of Scientific Discovery: Or, Year-book of Facts in Science and Art - Page 330
1867
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The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Volume 196

Sydney Smith, Lord Francis Jeffrey Jeffrey, Macvey Napier, William Empson, Sir George Cornewall Lewis, Henry Reeve, Arthur Ralph Douglas Elliot (Hon.), Harold Cox - 1902
...countries where larger species of the same natural families formerly existed is not the consequence of any gradual diminution of the size of such species,...animals have bent and accommodated themselves to changes which have destroyed the larger species.' All this is admirably sound, and Darwin himself would not...
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The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal: Exhibiting a View of the ..., Volume 51

Robert Jameson - Science - 1851
...formerly existed, is not to be ascribed to any gradual diminution of the size of such larger animals, but is the result of circumstances which may be illustrated by the fable of the " oak and the reed" — the small animals have bent and accommodated themselves to changes under which the larger species have...
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The Edinburgh New Philosophical Journal, Volume 51

Science - 1851
...formerly existed, is not to be ascribed to any gradual diminution of the size of such larger animals, but is the result of circumstances which may be illustrated by the fable of the " oak and the reed" — the small animals have bent and accommodated themselves to changes under which the larger species have...
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Philosophical Magazine

Science - 1851
...formerly existed, is not to be ascribed to any gradual diminution of the size of such larger animals, but is the result of circumstances which may be illustrated by the fable of the ' oak and the reed ' ; the small animals have bent and accommodated themselves to changes under which the larger species have...
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A Treatise on the Methods of Observation and Reasoning in Politics, Volume 2

Sir George Cornewall Lewis - Political science - 1852
...formerly existed, is not to be ascribed to any gradual diminution of the size of such larger animals, but is the result of circumstances which may be illustrated by the fable of The Oak and the Reed ; the small animals have bent and accommodated themselves to changes under which the larger species have...
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Abstracts of the Papers Communicated to the Royal Society of London, Volume 6

Science - 1854
...formerly existed, is not to be ascribed to any gradual diminution of the size of such larger animals, but is the result of circumstances which may be illustrated by the fable of ' the oak and the reed ' ; the small animals have bent and accommodated themselves to changes under which the larger species have...
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Abstracts of the Papers Communicated to the Royal Society of London, Volume 6

Science - 1854
...formerly existed, is not to be ascribed to any gradual diminution of the size of such larger animals, but is the result of circumstances which may be illustrated by the fable of ' the oak and the reed ' ; the small animals have bent and accommodated themselves to changes under which the larger species have...
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Maryland and Virginia Medical Journal, Volume 13

1859
...species of the same natural families formerly existed, is not the consequence of degeneration—of any gradual diminution of the size of such species,...should become extinct, appears, from the abundant evidence of the fact of extinction, to be a, law of their existence; whether, however, it be inherent...
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On the Classification and Geographical Distribution of the Mammalia: Being ...

Richard Owen - Animals - 1859 - 103 pages
...formerly existed, is not the consequence of degeneration—of any gradual diminution of the size—of such species, but is the result of circumstances which...species should become extinct appears, from the abundant evidence of the fact of extinction, to be a law of their existence; whether, however, it be inherent...
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Report

British Association for the Advancement of Science - Science - 1859
...countries where larger species of the same natural families formerly exisied, is not the consequence of any gradual diminution of the size of such species,...animals have bent and accommodated themselves to changes which have destroyed the larger species." Accepting this explanation of the extirpation of species...
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