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OCCASIONAL P1EcEs—continued.
STANZAS TO THE PO . . . . . . . . .

EPIGRAM. FROM THE FRENCH OF RULHIERES . . . . .

SONNET TO GEORGE IV. ON THE REPEAL OF LORD EDWARD FITZGERALD'S
FORFEITURE . . . . . . . . . . .

STANZAS. “ COULD LOVE FOR EVER." ETC. . . . .

ON MY WEDDING DAY . . . . . . . .

EPITAPH FOR WILLIAM PITT . . . . . . . . .

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EPIGRAM. “ THE WORLD IS A BUNDLE OF HAY,” ETC. . . .
THE CHARITY BALL . . . . .

EPIGRAM ON THE BRAZIER’S COMPANY HAVING
AN ADDRESS TO QUEEN CAROLINE . .

R ESOLVED TO PRESENT

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BOWLES AND CAMPBELL . . . . - - .

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JOHN KEATS . . . .

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“The Emperor Nepos was acknowledged by the Senate, by the Italians, and by the Provincials of Gaul ; his moral virtues, and military talents, were loudly celebrated; and those who derived any private benefit from his government announced in prophetic strains the restoration of public felicity. * ”‘ By this shameful abdication, he protracted his life a few years, in a. very ambiguous state, between an Emperor and an Exile, till _ .“——GIBBoN’s Decline and Fall, vol. vi., p. 220.1‘

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' * [‘ ‘ Great Hannibal within the balance lay, And tell how many pounds his ashes weigh."—Dn.\'I)EN. Sir John Paterson had the curiosity to weigh the ashes of a person discovered a few years since in the parish oi‘ Eccles. Wonderful to relate he found the whole did not

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VOL. II, 13

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ON the morning of the ninth of April, 1814, Lord Byron reiterated the resolution he formed, on the publication of “The Corsair,” to cease from versifying till he was turned of thirty. “No more rhyme for-—or rather from—me. I have taken my leave of the stage, and henceforth will mountebank it no longer.” In the evening came the news of the abdication of Fontainebleau, and the next day the poet violated his vow by composing this Ode. It originally consisted of only eleven stanzas, and the subsequent additions, which were request/ed by Mr. Murray to avoid the stamp duty then imposed on a single sheet, are of an inferior cast. The three last stanzas were never printed during the poet’s life. “I don’t,” he said, “like them at all, and they had better be left out. The fact is I can’t do anything I am asked to do, however gladly I would ,- and at the end of a week my interest in a composition goes oif.” While refusing in the face of his total-abstinence pledge to put his name to the Ode, he directed Mr. Murrayto proclaim openly whose it was, and declared his intention of incorporating it with his avowed productions. “Nothing,” he said, “but the occasion which was physically irresistible made me swerve; and I thought an anon;/me within my pact with the public." He was prophetic as well as poetic on the event. “I shall think higher of rhyme and reason, and very humbly of your heroic people, till—Elba become a volcano, and sends him out again. I can’t think it all over yet.” Southey confessed that there was in the “Ode to Napoleon,” as in all Lord Byron's poems, great spirit and originality, though the meaning was not always clearly developed—which is strong praise from a hostile quarter, however inadequate to the merits of a piece that contains such grand and energetic stanzas. Lord Byron once asked Southey in conversation if he did not think Napoleon a great man in his villany. The Laureate replied, “No——that he was a mean-minded villain,” and on the publication of the Ode he exclaimed that Lord Byron had come round to this opinion. With Southey’s conception of the character of Napoleon we have nothing to do, but we can see no ground for his imputing a change of sentiment to Lord Byron, who appears to us to have been consistent with himself. To say that a person is a great man, and a villa-in, can only signify that he is intellectually great, and morally the reverswan estimate confirmed and not contradicted by the Ode. The main objection to the p0et’s doctrine is that he adopts an unworthy standard of heroism when he inveighs against Napoleon for refusing to fling away life with fortune, which, -—not to urge any higher argument,-—is the resource of the cowardly, the feebleminded, and the insane.

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’TIs done-—-but yesterday a King !
And arm’d with Kings to strive—
And now thou art a nameless thing:
So abject—yet alive!
Is this the man of thousand thrones,
Who strew’d our earth with hostile bones,
And can he thus survive? ‘
Since he, miscall’d the Morning Star,
Nor man nor fiend hath fallen so far.

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1 [“ I don’t know~—but I think I, even I (an insect compared with this creature), have set my life on casts not a millionth part of this man’s. But, after all, a crown may not be worth dying for. Yet, to outlive Lodi for this 1 I ! Oh that J uvenal or Johnson could rise from the dead ! ‘ Expend¢.»—quot libras in duce summo invemei1

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