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RIGHTS OF SCHOOLMASTERS IN CORRECTING PUPILS.-In the Supreme Judicial Court, now holding at Cambridge, the case of Commonwealth vs. Kimball, a school teacher in Framingham, for assault on a pupil, came up on exceptions to the instructions given the jury in the lower Court, as to the right of a teacher to punish a scholar corporeally. Chief Justice Shaw settled the instructions to have been correct. They were as follows:

“ That if the defendant inflicted blows to enforce discipline, the presumption was that he did it in the due and proper execution of his duty, that he was put in the place of the parent, and he might inflict moderate and responsible punishment for any violation of a rule of the school, and if the pupil had violated a rule, and if for this the defendant had inflicted punishment according to his own judgment, and it was not excessive and unreasonable, he would not be liable; but if, on the contrary, they should be satisfied that the punishment inflicted was unreasonable and excessive, and the pupil was thereby injured, the defendant would be liable, although the injury so sustained was not a lasting one.”

EXAMINATION.

A school mistress presented herself before the superintending school committee of one of our country towns, for the purpose of being examined in the branches of education necessary to teach the young idea to shoot; when the following dialogue took place:

Gents, I have come to get my certificate of my qualification to keep school in this town.

Mr. Well, I have a few questions to ask; (with dignity,) How old are you?

Eighteen, sir.
Mr. How much do you weigh?
One hundred and fifty.
Mr. How many cows does your father keep?
Nine, sir.
Mr. Ain't you a cousin to Harriet Felton?
I am not acquainted with her.

Mr. Think you can lick Sam Jones's Bill? he's an awful bad boy.

Yes, sir, I think I can, if it is necessary.

Mr. Well, I guess you'll pass, and if you have any trouble in flogging Bill Jones, send for me.—Anon.

A WORD FOR OURSELVES.

In the closing number of this volume of the Teacher, it seems appropriate to take a slight retrospect of the past, in order that we may the more justly estimate our grounds of hope for the future. So far as the writer's knowledge extends, this is the only educational journal in our country, conducted and sustained wholly by a association of teachers. This circumstance is in itself a recommendation, inasmuch as it serves as an incitement to the teacher to make known his views and modes of instruction and discipline, this work affording the most appropriate medium through which those views and modes can be discussed.

Many things which in theory appear beautiful and promise great results, are found, in practice, to be wholly inapplicable or entirely inefficacious. We would render all the youth of our land, highly intelligent and thoroughly virtuous; we would guide them to the surest paths of usefulness and happiness in this life, with the hope that these would lead to never-ending happiness in the life to come. Could we work upon the intellect and heart with the same certainty that we work upon brute matter, we should be sure of our purpose. But the diversities of human character and human capabilities are indefinitely more various than the teints which beautify and distinguish the works of nature. Hence in education, no particular plan, however faithfully pursued, will be attended with universal success. The science of education, like that of medicine, must, in a great degree, be founded upon experience. We must know, therefore, what measures others have tried, and what degree of success has attended their efforts, if we would be assured of the correctness of our own course, or if, realizing its defects, we would seek, with any degree of confidence, an efficacious remedy. We want, in short, the results of experience, and these must be almost entirely furnished by the practical teacher.

In supplying these lessons of experience, we trust that the Massachusetts Teacher has done some service. Diverse and conflicting views have been advocated with a spirit of amity and an honest desire to arrive at the truth. Nevertheless we hear the call for more practical matter. The inexperienced teacher wants to know, not so much what is to be done, as the surest means by which the work can be accomplished. It is hoped that in future this demand will be more fully supplied. Let writers tell us how they teach, by what motives they stimulate their pupils to healthy, vigorous intellectual exertion, to the observance of the laws of health, submission to necessary and salutary government, to good manners, to purity of thought, and strictly moral conduct. Let them tell us of their success and their failures, that thus they may set up beacon lights for the guidance of others..

We would bespeak for the journal a more extended patronage. This we would do, not because it has not received fair encouragement and support, for in this respect it has fully equalled any reasonable expectations, but in order that it may fill a wider sphere of usefulness, that it may elicit the thoughts and embody the experience of a greater number of instructors. Some may think that they are too wise to learn, that their own modes of teaching and governing are the best, and admit of no improvement. If their estimate is just, they are peculiarly fit to guide efforts of others; they are the teachers whose communications can do the most good, and to whom the inexperienced and less successful may rightfully look for aid. Nor let the timid and those seeking for light fail, through diffidence, to add to the pages of this work. True, each editor has the entire control of his own number, and may adopt or reject any communication addressed to bim; but it is believed that each will exercise a fraternal courtesy, and admit any thing, which, in his opinion, will promote the great cause of education. There are many objects which deserve support and encouragement, on account of the general good that will probably result from them, and among these, education stands preëminent. To the friends of humanity, whether teachers, school committees, or parents, we trust that our appeal will not be in vain.

WHAT IS THE SECRET OF Success ?—Hear Henry Clay answer the question. In a speech at the National Law School, at Ballston Spa, he said: “Constant, persevering application will accomplish everything. To this quality, if I may be allowed to speak of myself, more than to anything else, do I owe the little success which I have attained. Left in early life to work my own way alone, without friends or pecuniary resources, and with no other than a common education, I saw that the pathway before was long, steep and rugged, and that the height upon which I had ventured to fix the eye of my ambition, could be reached only by toil the most severe, and a purpose the most indomitable. But shrinking from no labor, disheartened by no obstacles, I struggled on. No opportunity, which the most watchful vigilance could secure, to exercise my power, was permitted to pass by unimproved.”

Mr. Wheeler of Worcester, to whom the editorial care of the present number of the Teacher belonged, not being able to attend to that duty in consequence of protracted illness, the copy has been furnished by the Resident Editors.

CONTENTS OF VOL. IV.

age,

Page.

Page.
Notice to Subscribers,...... 3 Thought and its Expression,..... 114
Convenient and Attractive School- The Teacher's Rewards,...

118

houses,..

4 A Word fitly spoken, how good is

Faith develops True Greatness,.. 5 it!

121
Collegiate Education,

6 Old Methods, and New Ones,.... 123

The Vocation once more.........

12 Our Journal,..

124

Training of Idiots,....

14 Truancy,

125

Remarks of Rev. J. D. Butler, at Dedication of New School-houses,. 126

the Dinner of the Semi-centen- Dedication of a New School-house

nial Celebration of Middlebury in Barnstable,

127

College,

19 Dedication of a High School-

Extract,

23 house in Lynn,

127

Plymouth County Teachers' Asso- Moral Training,

129

ciation,...

26 | Extract,

132

Obituary, William Chamberlain Recitation of Poetry,.

133
Bradlee,

31 The Teacher's Encouragements,. 136
School Laws,-Important Deci- Mutual Exercises,...

139

sion,

32 A New Version of an Old Pass.

The Necessity of Restraint,.. 33

141

Smart Children,..

36 Extract, ..

141

The Art of Teaching,

37 Communication,

142

Conducting Recitations,.... 39 Extract, .

142
Make known what you know, or A Leaf from a Teacher's Note
Teaching promotive of Self-Cul- Book,

143
ture,

42 Teacher, are you an Early Riser ? 145

Culture,

45 Composition,

146

A Reflection,

47 Teacher, you instruct others, are

Education,..

49 you not neglecting yourself?... 149

Extract,

51 The Berkshire County Teachers'

Algebraic Paradox,..

52 Association,

150

Norfolk County Teachers' Asso- One of the Teacher's Trials,..... 154

ciation,..

54 Solution of Problem,

155

Books,

57 Extracts,

156

Scraps,
68 Education in Boston,

157

Testimony of a Rich Man,

59 Extract,.....

168

The more Haste the worse Speed,. 59 Education in Massachusetts, 159

Alfred the Great,.

60 Notice, ....

160

Schools of Massachusetts for 1819, 60 Laying Foundations,

161

State Reform School, Westboro', 61 A Dialogue between Two School

Schools in Boston,.....

62 Boys,.....

166

Schools in Charlestown,

62 Universal Education,..

169

Schools in Roxbury,.

64 Sympathy between Teachers and

Schools in New York,....

61 Parents essential to the highest

Schools in Philadelphia,

64 good of the Pupils at School,.. 170

Population of the Globe,

64 Concert Recitations,

173

The Teacher's Library,....

65 Concert Thinking,

174

Fourteenth Annual Report of the The Teacher an Enthusiast, 176
Secretary of the Board of Edu. Normal Schools,

176

cation,

73 Hampden County Teachers' As-

Problem,

77 sociation,..

177

The Priniary Teacher,

78 Power of Early Influences,...... 179

Teaching Physiology,

81 The Example of the Teacher bet-

Grammar-Book, ....

87 ter than Precept,

180

Use of Text Books in Schools,... 91 Punctuality, .

181
Influence of Example in Educa- Essex County Teachers' Associa-
tion,

92
tion,

183
History and Present State of the A Dialogue for 1813,

183
School Reform in Maine,...... 93 "The Algebraic Paradox,

184
Public Schools in Circinnati,. 95 Extracts,

185
The Growth of the Teacher, 97 Why do we Study?

186

Physical Conditions of Mental New Method of Proving Multipli.

Exertion, ....

107 cation,

187

Page.

Page.

Extracts,

187 | Exhibition of Cambridge High

Obituary, Barnum Field, of Bos- School,

293

ton,

188 Bridgewater Normal Association, 303

The Study of Languages,. 190 | American Association for Ad.

Common School Libraries,

191 vancement of Education, .....

Letter to the Publisher,.... 191 Reply to Communication

Plymouth County Teachers' Asso-

New Method of Proving Mal.

ciation,..
192 tiplication,"

313

Parental Training,
193 Parental Education,

314

Physical Science,
199 Discrimination, ....

315

Employment in the School-room,. 201 The Duties of School Children,..

315

Vacations and Holidays in Boston To the Mother,....

316

Schools,

203 Fifth Report of New Hampshire, 317

Extracts,

203 The Omission of a Gentle Word,. 319

Prof. Stephen Chase,...

204 Teachers' Institutes in Connect.

Extract,
205 icut for 1851 ,..

320

Algebraic Paradox,

206 Extract,

Extract,
206 Intellectual Arithmetic,

321

Drawing,

207 A Method of Teaching Spelling,. 324

Teachers, do you study the Char- The Schoolmaster,

325

acter of your Scholars ?....... 208 A Normal School,..

326

Norfolk County Teachers' Asso-

Extracts,

326

ciation,...

209 The Mind Susceptible of Cultiva-

Report on the Phonetic System,. 212 tion, ...

Communication on New Method Boston Schools,

of Proving Multiplication,..... 214 The Best is the Cheapest,.,

336

Elements of Latin Pronunciation, 215 Discipline of Public Schools,... 337

Evening and Adult Schools,. 216 Schools of Cleveland,..

242

School Counsellor Dinter,

217 Outline of Subjects and Exer-

American Association for Ad-

cises,

......343, 353

vancement of Education, 219 Notice, Norfolk Association,..... 352

American Institute of Instruc- Notice, Mass. Association,.... 352

tion,

220 School Expenditures of Boston,. 372

Bristol Co. Teachers' Association, 220 Communication on Spelling, 373

New Postage Law,.

224 Essex Teachers' Association,.. 374

The Teacher,
226 School Statistics, Maine,...

379

The Public Press,
229 Anecdote of Bowditch,

379

Sustain your Profession,.
231 Rights of Schoolmasters,

380

Gentleness,.....

233 Anecdote,

Teaching and Errors in Teaching, 234 A Word for Ourselves,

381

A Deficiency of Moral Instruction, 238 What is the Secret of Success ?... 382
Profanity,

239
The Door Scraper, or the Influence

POETRY.
of School on Home,..... 241 Be Kind,

School Supervision,
244 A Word to the Sluggish,

86

Plymouth Co. Association, 245 Onward is thy Path, Upward is thy

Communications,
252 Home,

122

Sixth Report of Connecticut Sup- Stanzas,

156

erintendent,
253 Great in Little,

168

A Public Library,
255 Speak not a Bitter Word,.

182

Meeting of the American Institute The Child is Father to the Man,.. 182

of Instruction,
257 Seek Wisdom,

252

Teachers' Institutes,.
288 The Spirit of Sympathy,

316

Immigration,.....

.289, 291 / Perseverance,..

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