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ution of were found a great number of cards, amongst whom the huge and terrific horns Eowed

, id by ministers, and containing notes of Uri and Unterwalden were heard to blow. Vattative to the prisoners.

The battle became instantly a rout; the One of these cards, numbered 64,389,000, Burgundians and their duke fled, losing, contained these words : “ Foucquet, from the indeed, few of their numbers, as the Swiss Isles of Saint Marguerite, with a Mask of had no cavalry to pursue, but leaving to the Iron ;" afterwards "XXX,” and underneath, conquerors the plunder of a camp which "Kersadwin.” I have seen this card in the rivalled that of Xerxes in luxury and splenhands of those who found it.

dour. Silken tents attached with cords of Every one is aware, (continues Desodoard,) golden wire, velvets, tapestry, pearls, and that the superintendant Foucquet was at first jewels in profusion, became the property of confined in the citadel of Pignerol, which the amazed victors. Plate was flung away then belonged to France; that he passed as pewter. The large diamond which the several years there, and eventually found duke wore customarily at his neck, was found means of escape. It is not known where in a box of pearls ; it was at first rejected as this celebrated exile died : the fact is attested a bauble, then taken up again and sold for a in the Memoires de Gourville, the friend of crown. It was afterwards purchased by the Foucquet. It is probable, conjecturing from Pope for 20,000 ducats, and still adorns the the card found in the Bastile, that Foucquet papal tiara. Another equally beautiful diawas retaken and conducted to the Isles of mond, worn at Granson, was bought by St. Marguerite, whence he was brought to Henry VIII., and afterwards given by his the Bastile in 1691. Voltaire remarks that, daughter Mary to her husband, Philip II. ; at this epoch, there disappeared no man of and it now belongs to Austria. consequence in Europe: that is true; but, In one of the battles fought by the Duke of the disappearance of Foucquet is dated 1664. Enghien, two French noblemen were left

With regard to the mask of iron which wounded among the dead on the field of he wore, it was, without doubt, a plan de- battle. One complained loudly of his pains ; vised to prevent the prisoner being recog- the other, after a long silence, thus offered nised on his route; as he had many friends. him consolation : “ My friend, whoever you It would be absurd to suppose that he wore are, remember that our God died on the the mask all his life; because it is certain cross, our king on the scaffold; and if you that his face would have become inflamed, have strength to look at him who now speaks and

gangrene have terminated his days. to you, you will see that both his legs are Without deciding any thing by this card, shot away.” I can only say, in support of the conjectures of M. Desodoard, that long before the taking riding near Leipsic, when a peasant came

Charles XII., King of Sweden, was once of the Bastile, I heard iť told to a man of and knelt before him to request justice from the court, (who had the particular confidence

a grenadier, who had carried away his family's of a celebrated minister,) that the prisoner dinner. The king ordered the soldier to was not a Prince, but a much disgraced Minister.

“ Is it true," said he, with a stern appear. countenance, “ that you have robbed this

man ?"_" Sire,” said the soldier, “ I have Anecdote Ballery.

not done him so much injustice as your majesty has done my master; you have taken

from him a kingdom, and I have taken only Tile first battle between the Swiss and the

a turkey from this fellow.” Burgundians under Charles the Bold, was

the peasant ten ducats, and pardoned the

soldier for the boldness of his bon mot, sayfought in 1476. The duke had a strongly ing to him, “ Remember, if I have disposintrenched camp at Granson, but scorning sessed Augustus of a kingdom, I have kept such advantage against the Swiss peasants, he advanced to meet them on the road to

nothing for myself.Neufchâtel; thus offering battle in a hilly

Frederic the Great had five libraries, all region, where his numerous cavalry could exactly alike, and containing the same books prove of no advantage. The two armies met ranged in the same order; one at Potzdam, on the second of March. The Swiss foot a second at Sans Souci, a third at Berlin, a embodied in large masses, and armed with fourth at Charlottenburg, and a fifth at Breslong halberds, bore down the Burgundian

law. On removing to either of these places, knights

, who in vain resisted. Charles had he had only to make a note of the page at a few archers, and no infantry in the advance; which he left off, to pursue it without interthus committing the usual mistake of the ruption on his arrival.

Accordingly, he French, in deeming mounted gentlemen able always bought five copies of the books he to repel twice their number of peasants on

chose to read. foot

. The Burgundian flank was soon turned Colonel Kemyss, of the 40th regiment, was by other bands of the Swiss mountaineers, remarkable for the studied pomposity of his

MILITARY ANECDOTES.

The king gave

IN WESTMINSTER ABBEY.

NOT TO PERPETUATE A NAME WHICH MUST ENDURE WHILE THE

PEACEFUL

BUT TO SHOW
THAT MANKIND HAVE LEARNED TO HONOUR

THOSE

RAISED THIS MONUMENT TO

TO THE IMPROVEMENT OF

STATUE OF JAMES WATT,

tion list, with a subscription of 500$ir Humphry Davy, who followed, in. elu

quent comparison between Watt ad ArchiThis noble monument, by Chantrey, is placed medes, said that Archimedes neld abstract in St. Paul's chapel, one of the small chapels science in the highest esteem, while the on the north side of the choir of the chapel genius of Watt, on the contrary, transformed of Edward the Confessor. Its pedestal, or every priuciple upon which it seized into a base, hears the following eloquent inscription, useful practical application, and might be

said to have called down science from heaven written by Lord Brougham:

to earth.”

" It was at this meeting that Mr. Peel did himself so much honour by his frank and

ardent acknowledgment of the debt of grati. ARTS FLOURISH,

tude due by himself and his family the inventer of the steam-engine, to whom he said, they owed all that they possessed. He

felt that the class of society from which he WHO BEST DESERVE THEIR GRATITUDE, THE KING,

had sprung had been ennobled by the genius

of Watt. Mr. Brougham dilated eloquently, HIS MINISTERS, AND MANY OF THE NOBLES and, as M. Dupin describes it, in a tone of AND COMMONERS OF THE REALM,

voice simple, grave, impressive, on the geJAMES WATT,

neral character, both intellectual and moral,

of his illustrious friend, whose memory they WHO, DIRECTING THE FORCE OF AN ORIGINAL

had come together to honour. Not, he GENIUS,

said, 'that his memory needs a monument to FARLY EXERCISED IN PHILOSOPHIC RESEARCH, make it immortal; for the remembrance of THE STEAM ENGINE,

him will be as durable as the power which he

has subjected to the use of man; but to conENLARGED THE RESOURCES OF HIS COUNTRY, secrate his example in the face of the world, INCREASED THE POWER OF MAN,

and to show to all the world that a man of extraordinary talent cannot employ it better than in devoting it to the service of the whole

human species.""* AND THE REAL BENEFACTORS OF THE WORLD,

The statue is a masterly performance of BORN AT GREENOCK, MDCCXXXVI.

art, and adds even to the sculptor's high repu. DIED AT HEATHFIELD, IN STAFFORDSHIRE,

tation. It is said by those who knew Watt, MDCCCXIX.

to convey his figure and aspect: even a glance There is not a word of monumental flattery will associate his noble genius and capacious in these emphatic lines; but they assert brow. certain useful truths, upon which are based the interests and happiness of the whole of THE MAN IN THE IRON MASK. the human race.

(From the French.) The erection of this monument originated We find in the History of the French Revoat a meeting held in the Freemason's Hall, lution, by M. Desodoard, a singular remark on Friday, June 18, 1824,eleven years since. « On this occasion, the relative to the Prisoner of the Bastile, so ate Earl of Liverpool, then Prime Minister, famous under the name of “ Iron Mask.” was in the chair, and was supported by his tile, (says M. Desodoard,) all the doors of

Immediately after the taking of the Bas. colleagues, Mr. Peel and Mr. Huskisson the interior were thrown open. The papers Mr. Canning was also to have been present, which were deposited in this state-prison, but was detained by official business. The (and the preservatiou of which would have other principal speakers were Sir Humphry been a great acquisition to history,) were Davy, Mr. Wilberforce, Sir James Mackin- left entirely

to the mercy of the multitude

. tosh, and Mr. Brougham.” Of these illustrious men, two only, (Mr. Peel and Mr. However,

the more curious collected together Brougham,) have lived to see completed the and preserved some of these documents, among tribute which their eloquence so honourably meeting is due to the Printing Machine.

* Our acknowledgment for these particulars of the advocated. “ Lord Liverpool, who first ad. dressed the assembly, concluded his speech statue, which ought to be noticed. First, the meetby announcing that the King himself had ing at which it originated is said to have beeu promptdesired him to state how deeply penetrated have elapsed between the proposition and completion

AND ROSE TO AN EMINENT PLACE AMONG THE MOST ILLUSTRIOUS FOLLOWERS

OF SCIENCE

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ed by the Baron Dupin. Secondly, eleven years his Majesty was with the sense of the ser- of the monument. Indeed, there is a third fact: vices rendered to Great Britain by him whose memory they were met to honour, and desired Abbey, and the Baron Dupin speaks of his remains

lying in the obscure retirement of some unkuown to place his name at the head of the subscrip- cemetery.

There are two remarkable circumstances connected with this

Watt was not honoured with burial in Westminster

att

and offich were found a great number of cards, amongst whom the huge and terrific horns ed,

igned by ministers, and containing notes of Uri and Unterwalden were heard to blow. relative to the prisoners.

The battle became instantly a rout; the One of these cards, numbered 64,389,000, Burgundians and their duke fled, losing, contained these words : “ Foucquet, from the indeed, few of their numbers, as the Swiss Isles of Saint Marguerite, with a Mask of had no cavalry to pursue, but leaving to the Iron ;" afterwards "XXX,” and underneath, conquerors the plunder of a camp which "Kersadwin.” I have seen this card in the rivalled that of Xerxes in luxury and splenhands of those who found it.

dour. Silken tents attached with cords of Every one is aware, (continues Desodoard,j golden wire, velvets, tapestry, pearls, and that the superintendant Foucquet was at first jewels in profusion, became the property of confined in the citadel of Pignerol, which the amazed victors. Plate was fiung away then belonged to France; that he passed as pewter. The large diamond which the several years there, and eventually found duke wore customarily at his neck, was found means of escape. It is not known where in a box of pearls; it was at first rejected as this celebrated exile died : the fact is attested a bauble, then taken up again and sold for a in the Memoires de Gourville, the friend of crown. It was afterwards purchased by the Foucquet. It is probable, conjecturing from Pope for 20,000 ducats, and still adorns the the card found in the Bastile, that Foucquet papal tiara. Another equally beautiful diawas retaken and conducted to the Isles of mond, worn at Granson, was bought by St. Marguerite, whence he was brought to Henry VIII., and afterwards given by his the Bastile in 1691. Voltaire remarks that, daughter Mary to her husband, Philip II. ; at this epoch, there disappeared no man of and it now belongs to Austria. consequence in Europe : that is true; but, In one of the battles fought by the Duke of the disappearance of Foucquet is dated 1664. Enghien, two French noblemen were left

With regard to the mask of iron which wounded among the dead on the field of he wore, it was, without doubt, a plan de- battle. One complained loudly of his pains ; vised to prevent the prisoner being recog. the other, after a long silence, thus offered nised on his route; as he had many friends. him consolation : “ My friend, whoever you It would be absurd to suppose that he wore are, remember that our God died on the the mask all his life; because it is certain cross, our king on the scaffold; and if you that his face would have become inflamed, have strength to look at him who now speaks and gangrene have terminated his days.

to you, you will see that both his legs are Without deciding any thing by this card, shot away.” I can only say, in support of the conjectures

Charles XII., King of Sweden, was once of M. Desodoard, that long before the taking riding near Leipsic, when a peasant came of the Bastile, I heard it told to a man of and knelt before him to requesi justice from the court, (who had the particular confidence

a grenadier, who had carried away his family's of a celebrated minister,) that the prisoner dinner.

The king ordered the soldier to was not a Prince, but a much disgraced

“ Is it true," said he, with a stern Minister.

appear.
countenance, “ that you have robbed this

man ?"_" Sire," said the soldier, “ I have Anecdote Gallery.

not done him so much injustice as your majesty has done my master; you have taken

from him a kingdom, and I have taken only The first battle between the Swiss and the

a turkey from this fellow.”

The king gave Burgundians under Charles the Bold, was

the peasant ten ducats, and pardoned the

soldier for the boldness of his bon mot, sayfought in 1476. The duke had a strongly ing to him, “ Remember, if I have disposintrenched camp at Granson, but scorning sessed Augustus of a kingdom, I have kept such advantage against the Swiss peasants, he advanced to meet them on the road to nothing for myself." Neufchâtel; thus offering battle in a hilly

Frederic the Great had five libraries, all region, where his numerous cavalry could exactly alike, and containing the same books prove of no advantage. The two armies met ranged in the same order; one at Potzdam, on the second of March. The Swiss foot

a second at Sans Souci, a third at Berlin, a embodied in large masses, and armed with fourth at Charlottenburg, and a fifth at Breslong halberds, bore down the Burgundian

law. On removing to either of these places, knights, who in vain resisted. Charles had he had only to make a note of the page at a few archers, and no infantry in the advance; which he left off

, to pursue it without interthus committing the usual mistake of the ruption on his arrival. Accordingly, he French, in deeming mounted gentlemen able always bought five copies of the books he to repel twice their number of peasants on

chose to read. foot

. The Burgundian flank was soon turned Colonel Kemyss, of the 40th regiment, was by other bands of the Swiss mountaineers, remarkable for the studied pomposity of his

MILITARY ANECDOTES.

Edward III.

59 56 50 44 38

Charles II.

Edward I.

diction. One day, observing that a careless and the general, who was to drink first, bega man in the ranks had a particularly dirty by saying to the stranger, “colonel, ys face, which appeared not to have been washed good health.”—“I am no colonel,” rep'd for a twelvemonth, he was exceedingly indig. the stranger.-" Well, then," said the menant at so gross a violation of military pro- ral,“ major, your good health.”—“I m no priety. “Take him," said he to the corporal, major," replied the New Englander.—Then who was an Irishman, “ take the man, and your good health, captain," said the general. lave him in the waters of the Guadiana.” L" I am no captain, sir,” said the stranger, After some time, the corporal returned. “and, what is more, never held a commission “ What have you done with the man I sent in my life.”—“Well, then," said the general, with you ?" inquired the colonel. Up flew you are the first man in Kentucky that the corporal's right hand across the peak of ever wore a cloth coat and was not a commisthe cap—" Sure an't plaise y'r honnur, and sioned officer.”

W.G. C. din't y'r honnur tell me to lave him in the river? and sure enough I left him in the REIGNS OF THE KINGS OF ENGLAND. river, and there he is now, according to y'r The reigns of thirty kings, &c., since the honnur's orders.” The bystanders, and even the colonel himself, could hardly repress a

time of William the Conqueror, in 1066, smile at the facetious mistake of the honest arranged according to their duration. corporal, who looked innocence itself and

Yrs. Ms. Ds.

George III. wondered what there could be to laugh at.

Henry III.

7 An old colonel, who used to be invited

Elizabeth with us to dine at Luna's house, (says Mr.

Henry VI. Hardy,) had such a propensity to laughter, Henry VIII.

37 10

07 that, after having once yielded to its influence, he could not restrain himself as long as any

Henry I.

Henry II. thing remained to excite it. I used to make him burst into a horse-laugh whenever I

George II.

Charles I. chose, only by winking at him ridiculously.

Henry VII. Upon one occasion, when a great number of persons' were assembled at table, a fancy came across me to try whether a grin and an odd remark would have the same effect

Edward II.

7 upon him in company. It answered marvel. Stephen

19 lously well. He could not restrain a burst

17 7 of laughter, which rather startled the rest of

Henry IV.

William III. the party; to whom, however, I managed to William II.

12 11 18 convey a hint, and they immediately entered George I. into the spirit of the joke. Each, in his turn,

George IV. told some extraordinary anecdote, or made some odd remark, at which the colonel burst

Henry V. out anew, till at last his laughter became

19

Mary I. quite alarming. The consequence was that James II.

0 17 he did not swallow one mouthful during Richard III. dinner; for, no sooner did he attempt to

Edward V. introduce a bit of food into his odd mouth, William IV. began to reign June 26, 1830. which even then was distorted by a suppressed Mary, queen of William III., died Dec. grin, than some one made a laughable obser- 28, 1694. vation, which again excited the poor man's George, prince of Denmark, husband to risible propensity, and the meat was suffered Queen Anne, was born at Copenhagen, to return to his plate untasted. He afterwards April 11, 1653; died at Kensington, Oct. 28, complained that, in addition to his having 1708, in his 56th year; buried at Westminlost his dinner, his sides were quite sore with ster Abbey. Their only son, George, Duke the exertion.

of Gloucester, died at Windsor Castle, July General Scott and two or three others, buried in Westminster Abbey.

30, 1700, at the beginning of his 12th year; were sitting one evening in a log-tavern,

There have been six minorities since the when in came a well-dressed stranger, from Norman Conquest: that of Henry III., Ed. the New England States, and called for half ward III., Richard II., Henry VI., Eda pint of whisky. The landlord informed ward V., and Edward VI. W. G. C. him that he did not sell it in such small quantities. The general, who was very fond of whisky, said, “ Stranger, I will join you,

POPE'S RAPE OF THE LOCK. and pay half; therefore, landlord, give us a Mr. Caryl, (a gentleman who was Secretary pint of your best.” The whisky was brought to Queen Mary, wife of James II., whose

36 35 4 12 34 9 2 34 8 33 4 3 23 11 1 23 3 19 22 3 16 22 1 8 22 0 3 20 21 22 19

6 13 11

Richard II.
Edward IV.
James I.
William I

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John

13 13

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Anne

Richard I.

Edward VI.

12 11 6
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ortune he followed into France, and author first upon a large scale here, or in any part of el":

f the comedy of Sir Solomon Single, and of the world, he did not overlook the interests of d the everal translations in Dryden's Miscellanies,) the Bridgewater canal, which belonged to -"j originally proposed the subject of this poem him, but made a donation to that concern of to Pope, with the view of putting an end, by forty thousand pounds sterling, the better to this piece of ridicule, to a difference that enable it to meet the competition of the rail. had arisen between two noble families, those way. He was always ready to acknowledge of Lord Petre and Mrs. Fermor, on the trifling and promote public improvements, come what occasion of his having cut off a lock of her would to his own interests. He became the hair. This little liberty was taken too seri- principal proprietor of a new line of canal ously; and although the two families had between Liverpool and Birmingham, by long been friends, it occasioned a coolness which new and extensive internal communi. between them.

cations are to be opened in that part of Eng. This exquisite piece was written, as we land, appearing to clash, however, with his learn from Pope himself, in two cantos only, interests in the Trent and Mersey navigation. in less than a fortnight, in the year 1711, Nor would he ever throw any obstructions in when he was about twenty-three years old. the way of the projected rail-way between

The author sent a copy of it to the lady, Birmingham and Liverpool, although it is to with whom he was acquainted : and she was pass directly through some of his own estates so delighted with it that she distributed in Staffordshire, and must affect his interest copies of it among her acquaintance, and at in two canals. These, indeed, are maxims length prevailed on him to publish it, as ap- which should sway the conduct of a truly pears by the motto.

wise man.

But they are the maxims of an The piece produced the desired effect; enlarged and elevated wisdom, that rises for it reconciled the two families, and gave above the first impulse of selfishness, and offence to no one but Sir Geo. Brown, who which, by the lights of cultivated reason, often observed, with some degree of resent- can see in public benefits ultimate private ment, and, indeed, justice too, that he was advantage; just as the sound, political ecomade to talk nothing but nonsense in the nomist sees in measures, obviously for the character of Sir Plume. The incident occurred good of the whule community, ultimate beneat Hampton Court Palace.

fit to every part, even those parts supposed

at first to be injuriously affected. When also Select Biography.

a fall took place in the prices of agricultural produce, the Duke of Sutherland caused his English rents to be estimated according to

the annual average price of wheat, and his (By Mr. Rush, late American Minister in this country. Scotch rents according to that of wool, Abridged from an American work.)

although, by contract, they were to have Among the most distinguished of the noble- been paid in sums of money, much higher men of England who have recently passed than this scale of settlement yielded; which from the scene of life, was the late Duke of timely and well-judged liberality had the Sutherland. He was long known as Marquess happy and twofold effect of saving

his tenants of Stafford, the title of duke having been con- from loss, and his own estates from dilapiferred upon him hy the present King during dation. the administration of Earl Grey. Few persons But his manner of dealing with his Scotch who have flourished in any country or age, estates in the county of Sutherland is not to ever 'appropriated more liberally or benefici. be passed over without notice somewhat more ally the resources of a great estate, or made a particular. He came to the possession of better use of the advantages of a cultivated these estates by marriage; his Duchess, who mind and taste. The acquisitions of indivi- still lives to adorn and benefit society in her duals and manner in which they spend their own country, having been Countess of Sutherfortunes, are not, for the most part, topics of land in her own right, and as such, lineal public comment; but it is otherwise where inheritress of the most ancient subsisting the scale of their operations has been so peerage of Great Britain, with the property large as to affect and improve the resources annexed. In 1812, he began to turn his of a nation. The eminent British subject in attention to the effective improvement of this question was the original owner of one-fifth property, to which he had made important of the stock

of the Liverpool and Manchester additions by purchases of his own. rail-way. In this manner, he contributed tually made four hundred and fifty miles of materially to advance that great work in roads, Parliament, or the local public in England, which, in the beginning, had heavy Scotland, bearing half the expense; and he obstacles to contend with; but the final suc- constructed one hundred and thirty - four cess of which has done good not merely in bridges. His tenants on this property were, England, but everywhere, by the example it most or all of them, suffering under the evils set. In aiding this great English work, the of a crowded population without employment.

THE LATE DUKE OF SUTHERLAND.

He ac

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