Refracting the Canon in Contemporary British Literature and Film

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Susana Onega, Susana Onega Jaén, Christian Gutleben
Rodopi, 2004 - Literary Criticism - 261 pages
Contemporary works of art that remodel the canon not only create complex, hybrid and plural products but also alter our perceptions and understanding of their source texts. This is the dual process, referred to in this volume as “refraction”, that the essays collected here set out to discuss and analyse by focusing on the dialectic rapport between postmodernism and the canon. What is sought in many of the essays is a redefinition of postmodernist art and a re-examination of the canon in the light of contemporary epistemology. Given this dual process, this volume will be of value both to everyone interested in contemporary art—particularly fiction, drama and film—and also to readers whose aim it is to promote a better appreciation of canonical British literature.
 

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Contents

Introduction 715
7
Creative Bastardy in Sternes 1752
17
Rewriting the Canon in Contemporary 5368
53
Genre and Islam in Recent Anglophone Romantic Fiction 6982
69
Fight Club as a Refraction of 8394
83
Film Heroines of the Nineties 95110
95
Dickens and PostVictorian Fiction 111128
111
Charles Pallisers 129148
129
Refracting the Past in Praise of the Dead Poets in 149164
149
Jeanette Winterson and the Ethics of 165185
165
Caryl Phillips Subversive 187205
187
Strategies of Writing Back in 207229
207
To Hamlet and back with Humble Boy by Charlotte 231245
231
Notes on Contributors 247250
247
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