Weekly Medical Review, Volume 17

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J. H. Chambers & Company, 1888 - Medicine
 

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Page 306 - State, county and district medical society entitled to representation shall have the privilege of sending to the association one delegate for every ten of its regular resident members, and one for every additional fraction of more than half that number; Provided, however, that the number of delegates for any particular State, Territory, county, city or town shall not exceed the ratio of one in ten of the resident physicians who may have signed the Code of Ethics of the Association.
Page 306 - The delegates shall receive their appointment from permanently organized State medical societies and such county and district medical societies as are recognized by representation in their respective State societies, and from the medical departments of the army and navy and the Marine Hospital Service of the United States.
Page 82 - ... field of which tact is the manure. 3. Patients are comparable to flannel — neither can be quitted without danger. 4. The physician who absents himself runs the same risk as the lover who leaves his mistress ; he is pretty sure to find himself supplanted. 5. Would you rid yourself of a tiresome patient, present your bill. 6. The patient who pays his attendant is but exacting ; he who does not is a despot. 7. The physician who depends...
Page 275 - Pepsin is a catalytic body, and a given quantity will work almost indefinitely, provided the peptones are removed as they are formed. The good effects of water, drunk freely before meals, has, however, another beneficial result — it washes away the mucus which is secreted by the mucous membrane during the intervals of repose, and favors peristalsis of the whole alimentary tract. The membrane thus cleansed is in a much better condition to receive food and convert it into soluble compounds.
Page 458 - ... the community, and who are required to make so many sacrifices of comfort, ease, and health, for the welfare of those who avail themselves of their services, certainly have a right to expect and require, that their patients should entertain a just sense of the duties which they owe to their...
Page 31 - Adhesion of the impregnated ovum then takes place to the wall of the tube instead of the wall of the uterus, and then the ovum develops until the tube can no longer expand. Between the tenth and thirteenth week the tube gives way, and upon the position of the point at which the rupture takes place depends the variety of extrauterine pregnancy which is developed. By far the most common seat of rupture is out through the surface of the tube into the cavity of the peritoneum, because the proportion...
Page 306 - Each State, county and district medical society entitled to representation shall have the privilege of sending to the Association one delegate for every ten of its regular resident members, and one for every additional fraction of more than half that number: Provided, however, that the number of delegates...
Page 220 - The conditions annexed by the founder of this prize are that the " prize or award must always be for some subject connected with obstetrics, or the diseases of women, or the diseases of children...
Page 277 - Stewart attacks the recent deci'ion of the United States District Court in the matter of the suit of Battle & Co. against the Grosses (Daniel W. and Edward Z.) for infringement of their copyright of Bromidia. He declares that the decision is not final or binding, and advises the Grosses and druggists generally not to pay any attention to it. Dr. Stewart thus puts himself in contempt of the United States Courts and advises others to place themselves in the same foolish and dangerous predicament. The...
Page 599 - For a thousand years in thy sight are but as yesterday when it is past, and as a watch in the night. Thou carriest them away as with a flood; they are as a sleep: in the morning they are like grass which groweth up. In the morning it flourisheth, and groweth up; in the evening it is cut down, and withereth.

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