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OHIO COLLEGE OF DENTAL SURGERY.

An Institution of the Dentists and for the Dentists.

CINCINNATI, OHIO.

This Institution is technically a School of Dentistry. The property is owned and controlled by an association of dentists numbering nearly one hundred. The college building was erected and is used exclusively for the purposes of dental education. The Faculty is composed of dentists in actual practice, whose purpose it is to give a thorough course of instruction in the theory and practice of Dentistry. To this end the lectures in all the branches taught, including Anatomy, Surgery, Physiology, Pathology, Materia Mediea, and Chemistry, are arranged with a view to thoroughly qualify the student to practice the profession of dentistry.

Kecognizing the value of clinical instruction to the dental student, the regular Course of Lectures will be supplemented by a thorough course of training in the Infirmary and Laboratory under the direction of the professors and demonstrators. Clinics for instruction in Practical Dentistry will be given in the College Infirmary each afternoon and evening (except Sundays) during the entire session.

Cincinnati, through the medium of her numerous educational establishments for the promotion of the arts and sciences, her hospitals, dispensaries, libraries, public and private lectures, etc., affords superior advantages for a thorough education in any of the branches of the healing art. The large manufacturing interests of the city, which give direct employment to over one hundred thousand persons, make the location of the Ohio College of Dental Surgery especially favorable for teaching practical dentistry. This large population furnishes the greatest variety of cases for clinical instruction, and a supply of patients in excess of the demands for practice in the College Infirmary.

The Fortieth Annual Session will begin the sixth day of October, 1885, and continue till March following.

TUITION FEES.

Matriculation Fee (but once) | 6.00

Professors' Tickets for first session, whether Junior or Senior . 75.00

Professors' Tickets for second year 60.00

Dissecting Ticket, including material 10.00

Analytical Chemistry . . . . 10.00

Diploma Fee 25.00

A member of the College Corporation may register his student for the Winter Session, whether Junior or Senior, for $50.00.

Special courses may be taken at proportional rates.

All tuition fees are to be paid in advance.

For further information, address

H. A. SMITH, D.D.S., Dean,

128 Garfield Place, Cincinnati

Toland Hall, corner of Stockton and Francisco Streets,
SAN FRANCISCO, CAI*.

FACULTY.

WILLIAM T. BEID, A.M., President of the University and ex-officio President of the Faculty.

JOSEPH LB CONTE, M.D., LL.D., Honorary Professor of Biology.

S. W. DENNIS, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Operative Dentistry and Dental Histology.

0. L. GODDARD, A.M., D.D.S., Professor of Mechanical Dentistry.

M. W. FISH, M.D., Professor of Physiology.

W. E. TAYLOR, M.D., Professor of Principles and Practice of Surgery.

A. L. LENGFELD, M.D., Professor of Chemistry and Materia Medica.

WILLIAM B. LEWITT, M.D., Professor of Anatomy.

E. 0. COCHRANE, D.D.S., Clinical Professor of Mechanical Dentistry.

MAURICE J. SULLIVAN, D.D.S., Clinical Professor of Operative Dentistry.

L. L. DUNBAR, D.D.S., Professor of Dental Pathology and Therapeutics.
DEMONSTRATORS.

E. E*. PARK*' Bv'i'} Demonstrators of Operative Dentistry.

M^^GABBS^DDS D:D'8'' }Demonstrators of Mechanical Dentistry.
CLINICAL- INSTRUCTORS.*
C. F. W. BODECKER, M.D., D.D.S., R. W. HENDERSON. W. E. PRICE, D.D.S.

New York.
H. 0. DAVIS., L.D.S. A. F. McLAIN, M.D., D.D.S. JOHN RABE, D.D.S.

J. H. HATCH, D.D.S. THOMAS MORFFEW, D.D.S. J. L. WILLIAMS, D.D.S.,

C. W. HIBBARD, D.D.S. H. J. PLOMTEAUX, D.D.S. New Haven, Conn.

N.B.-—Demonstrators and Clinical Instructors appointed annually.

February 1, 1886, the Dental Department of the University of California commences its fourth annual session. From the very beginning it has succeeded far beyond the fondest hopes of its founders and the sanguine expectations of its friends. The number and character of its students have exceeded the anticipations of both founders and fri«nds. While we feel fully justified in saying that from the organization of the Dental Department of the University of California the facilities and opportunities for securing a dental education in it have been equal to any other similar institution of learning in the country, we are equally awaiethat the profession and the people would justly have more confidence in the scholarship and capabilities of graduates of a dental college that requires two terms of nine months each than they would have in those of graduates from a college that requires two terms of but four or five months attendance at most, with a preliminary term of a month or two, the attendance upon which is optional with the student. This plan of a nine months' term gives longer time for study and more for practical instructions and less crowding of both. We are glad to be able to say that the more intelligent students and those who are actuated by the best motives favor the step in advance, ft is an additional tax upon the time of both the student and the Faculty, without any increased tuition for the former or greater pecuniary reward for the latter; therefore, the motive for the change can be one only of professional and public interest, which we expect will meet with the commendation of both, and which must be our chief reward. We do not deem it necessary to give here the outline of our course of study, but would respectfully ask those who are particularly interested in it to refer to our Annual Announcement, in which it is given in the usual form, and which will be furnished any one upon application.

Surgical and medical clinics are held at the hospital three times a week, to which the dental students are admitted, with all the privileges accorded to medical students. The Lecture-Rooms, Operating-Rooms, and Laboratories are commodious, and their appointments complete,—not excelled by any college of the kind in the country.

Students may matriculate at any time. Every candidate for admission must be eighteen years of age. All matriculates, before admission, will be required to write a brief essay, not to exceed one page of foolscap in length, which will serve as a test of their qualifications in orthography and grammar, and also undergo an examination in the elementary principles of physics and mathematics. No matriculation examination will be required of candidates who have received a collegiate degree, or who have passed the examination for admission to or are graduates of the College of Literature or of Science of the University of California, or who have passed the matriculation examination of any recognized college? or who present a teacher's certificate covering the required subjects from a recognised normal or high school. He shall subscribe to Article II., Section 3, of the Code of Ethics of the American Dental Associatiou.f

J The candidate for the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery must have attained the age of twentyone years. He shall have passed a satisfactory examination, both oral and written,—a written examination being substituted in this college for a thesis. He shall have attended two full courses in the Dental Department of the University of California, or one course in some other reputable dental col lege and the second or last in this college. Graduates in medicine may apply for the degree of D.D.S.*, upon attending one full year in the Dental Department of the University of California. After these requirements have been complied with, upon recommendation of the Faculty and approval by the Board of Regents, the candidate may receive the degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery.

FEES. Matriculation (paid but once) . . . $5.00 I Demonstrators' Fees .... $30.00 Tuition 100.00 J Diploma 30.00

S. W. DENNIS, Dean,

530 Sutter St., San Francisco, Cat.

N.B.—The Medical and Dental Colleges of the University of California, as well as other medical colleges, unlike similar institutions in the Eastern States, hold their sessions during the Spring, Summer, and Fall months.

* Arranged alphabetically.

f The object of this requirement is to prevent students committing unprofessional acts during their college oourse.

t Th© Faculty hereby gives .notice that after January 1st, 1886, three years' study, including attendance upon two courses of lectures, will be required for graduation, and that graduates of medicine will be required to have two years of practical instruction or experience in dentistry; one year of which must be spent in the Dental Department of the University of California, including a course of lectures, for graduation.

61

DENTAL DEPARTMENT.

N. E. CORNER LOMBARD AND GREENE STREETS, BALTIMORE, MD.

Hon. SBVEE1T TEACKXIS WALIiIS, LL.D., Provost.

FACULTY.

FERDINAND J. S. GORGAS, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Principles of Dental Science, Dental Burger/,

and Mechanism. JAMBS H. HARRIS, M.D., D.D.8., Professor of Operative and Clinical Dentistry. SAMUEL 0. CHEW, M.D., Professor of Materia Medica and Therapeutics. FRANCIS T. MILES, M.D., Professor of Physiology. L, McLANE TIFFANY, M.P., Clinical Professor of Oral Surgery. J. EDWIN MICHAEL, M.D., Professor of Anatomy. R. DORSEY COALE, Mi. D, Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy. JOHN C. UHLER, M.D., D.D.S.. Demonstrator of Mechanical Dentistry. CHARLES L. STEEL, M.D., D.D.S., Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry. RANDOLPH WINSLOW, M.D., Demonstrator of Anatomy. B. MERRILL H0PKIN80N, M.D., D.D.8., ISAAC H. DAVIS, M.D., D.D.S., J. EDWIN HARRIS,

D. P.S., Assistant Demonstrators of Operative Dentistry. CHARLES F. DINGER, D.D.S., CHARLES J. LADSON, D.D.S., ELMER J. WISHERD, D.D.8., F.

GROSHANS, D.D.S., Assistant Demonstrators of Mechanical Dentistry. LUKE J. PEARCE, D.D.8., Demonstrator of Continuous Gum Work. ». GENESE, D.D.S., Clinical Instructor of ContinuouB-Gum, Metal, and Plastic Work.

[table]

At stated times during the Annual Sessions a number of the Corps of Clinical Instructors will hold Clinics and deliver Clinical Lectures.

The success which ha* attended the organization of the Dental Department of the University of Maryland, as evinced by the large classes in attendance on the lectures and demonstrations of the past sessions, is unprecedented in the history of any other dental institution. It is also an evidence of a just appreciation of the many advantages which a dental institution connected with an old and honored university and, with the medical and law schools, forming one of its departments, offers to the dental student in the acquirement of knowledge, theoretical and practical, so essential to the successful practice of dentistry.

„ The instruction in both operative and mechanical dentistry is as thorough as it is possible to make it, and embraces everything pertaining to dental art. The advantages which the general and oral surgical clinics, to which the dental students are admitted, as indeed to all the lectures of the University, afford, cannot be overestimated. The many thousands of patients annually treated in the UniversityHospital, which is well known to be the largest Hospital in Baltimore, afford an abundance of material for the dental infirmary and laiioratory practice, and the oral surgery clinics.

The Dental Infirmary and Laboratory Building is one of the largest and most complete structures of the kind in the world. The Infirmary is lighted by forty-seven large windows, and is furnished with the most improved operating chairs.

The Dental Infirmary and Laboratory are open daily (except Sundays) during the entire year for the reception of patients; and the practice for denkd students has increased to such an extent that all the students during the past session have had an abundance of practical work in both operative and prosthetic dentistry—the Record Books showing to the credit of many of them over one hundred fillings inserted for Infirmary patients, while rixtjf gold fillings has been a common average.* This meann for practical instruction has already assumed such large proportions that the supply has been beyond the needs of the large classes in attendance during the past sessions,

In addition to the facilities afforded by this institution for a thorough course of instruction in the theory and practice of dentistry, the clinics in the University Hospital enable the Dental equally with the Medical Students to become familiar with the diseases and operations of Practical Surgery; excisions of jaw, partial or entire; tumors, cancerous or benign, of various parts of the buccal cavity; plastic operations for the restoration of cheek, lips, etc., may be mentioned as having been before the class during the year. The induction of anesthesia by means of different agents—ether, chloroform, bromide of ethyl, nitrous oxide gas, all being used in the clinics—cannot fail to be of use to the student of Oral Surgery.

The Lecture Halls in the University Buildings are large and well lighted; and every facility will be afforded for practical and theoretical dental instruction. Demonstrations in Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology, (for which an abundance of material is furnished free of charge), also form an important part of the regular course. The Dissecting Room is large, well vsutilaled and lighted, and the Demonstrator of Practical Anatomy passes much of his time in assisting the students and directing their labors. Dissecting Material is furnished in abundance, free of charge.

Qualifications for Graduation: The candidate must have attended two full courses of lectures of live months each in different years at the Regular or Winter Sessions in this institutionThe following, however, will be considered as an equivalent to an attendance on one course of lectures in this College:—One course in any reputable Dental College; graduation in a reputable Medical College with one year of dental pupilage in a dental infirmary. The student meeting either of the above requirements will have the privilege of presenting himself as a candidate for graduation at the end of but one Course of Lectures. The matriculant must have a good English education; a diploma from a reputable literary institution, or other evidence of literary qualification will be received instead of a preliminary examination. All students, both juniors and seniors, have equal advantages in operative and mechanical dentistry in this institution throughout every session.

Graduation in Medicine: Graduates of the Dental Department of the University of Maryland are required to attend but one session at the University School of Medicine prior to presenting themselves as candidates for the degree of ** Doctor of Medicine." (See Catalogue.)

The Regular or Winter Session will begin on the 1st day of October, 1885, and will terminate about the 1st of March, 1886.

The Summer Session, for practical instruction, will commence in April, and continue until the regular Session begins. Students in attendance on the Summer Session will have the advantages of all the daily Surgical and Medical Clinics of the University.

The fees for the Regular Session are $100, Demonstrators' Fees included; Matriculation Fee, $5; Diploma Fee, for candidates for graduation, $J0; Dissecting Ticket, $10. For Summer Session, no charge to those who attend the following Winter Session. Beneficiary.—A Beneficiary student will be received from each State, on the recommendation of (tie State Dental Society, on the payment of half of the tuition fees. Board can be obtained at from $3.50 to $5 per week, according to quality. The University I'vv/m ana u uunioer ui other Prizes will be specified in the annual Catalogue. Students desiring information and the annual Catalogue will be careful to give full address and direct their letters to

F. J. S. GORGAS, M.D., D.D.S.,

Dean of the Dental Department of the University of Maryland.

259 *?• Kutaw Street, Baltimore, M<£.

A NEW EDITION

OF

QUIZ QUESTIONS.

COURSE ON DENTAL PATHOLOGY AND THERAPEUTICS.

PHILADELPHIA DENTAL COLLEGE.

(prof. J. FOSTER FLAGG, D.D.S.)
Answered by W. C. FOULKS, D.D.S..

Formerly Demonstrator and Instructor in Philadelphia Dental College.

No better test of the value of this work need be desired than the fact that it sells rapidly. The edition which we now offer is the third. The volume has been revised and brought down to date. It is offered as a complete manual for students and for reference by busy practitioners. It is assuredly the best condensation of practical information on Dental Pathology and Therapeutics. It is printed on good paper, interleaved for notes and additions, and substantially bound in cloth. Price $2.00

Pennsylvania College of Dental Surgery,

Twelfth Street, between Market and Arch, corner Filbert.

Thirtieth Annual Session, 1885-86.

FACULTY AND AUXILIARY INSTRUCTORS.

J. EWING MEARS, A.M., M.D., Professor of Anatomy and Surgery.

C. N. PEIHCE, D.D.S., Professor of Dental Physiology, Dental Pathology, and Operative Dentistry.

WILBUR F. LITCH, M.D.,D.D.S., Professor of Prosthetic Dentistry, Materia Medica, and Therapeutics.

HENRY LEFFMANN, M.D., D.D.S., Professor of Chemistry and Metallurgy.

ALBERT P. BRUBAKER, A.M., M.D., Professor of Physiology and General Pathology.

ALONZO P. BE ALE, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Prosthetic Dentistry.

PERCIVAL E. LODER, M.D., D.D.S., Demonstrator of Anatomy.

J. M. BARSTOW, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Carving Block Teeth and Continuous-Gum "Work.

A. G. BENNETT, D.D.S., Chief of the Clinics and Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry.

I. N. BROOMELL, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Prosthetic Dentistry.

G. L. S. JAMESON, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry.

ALEX. P. LONG, D.D.S., Demonstrator of Operative Dentistry.

I. A. KYNER, Ph.G., Demonstrator of Chemistry.

DELFIN RESTREPO, D.D.S., Assistant Demonstrator of Prosthetic Dentistry.

CLINICAL INSTRUCTORS.

Dr. F. M. DIXON, Dr. C. S. STOCKTON, Dr> JOHN B. WOOD.

Dr. J. N. FARRAR, Dr. T. F. CIIUPEIN, Dr. C. E. FRANCIS,

Dr. W. G. A. BONWTLL, Dr. W. H. TRUEMAN, Dr. URIAH KIRK,

Dr. A. L. NORTHROP, Dr. J. HAYHURST, Dr. E. C. BAXTER,

Dr. C. PALMER, Dr. J. G. TEMPLETON, Dr. A. H. BROCKWAY,

Dr, R. H. SHOEMAKER, Dr. W. R. MILLARD, Dr. A. B. ABELL,

Dr. CHAS. F.BONSALL, Dr. R. HOLLENBACK.

This College has accepted the requirements of the National Association of Dental Faculties with regard to admission and graduation of students. (See announcement for 1885-6, which can be procured from the Dean.)

THE SPRING AND FALL SESSIONS.

The Spring Course of Lectures will commence on the third Monday in March and continue until the first of June. Fee for the course, $50, which will be credited upon the fee for the regular session.

The Fall Course will commence on the first Monday in September and continue until the first of October, and will be free to those who matriculate for the regular session.

Attendance upon the Spring and Fall Courses will be deemed equivalent to the term of pupilage under a private preceptor.

THE REGULAR SESSION

Will commence on Thursday, October 1st, and continue until the first of March ensuing. Twenty lectures will be delivered each week on the various branches taught.

CLINICAL PRACTICE.

Lecture hours excepted, general clinical practice is available for the student continuously through the day. Competent instructors are always present.

GRADUATION IN MEDICINE.

By an arrangement with Jefferson Medical College, such students as may desire to do so can, it found qualified, obtain the two degrees, in Dentistry and Medicine, in three years. Students desiring togradnate in medicine are required to notify the Dean of their intention at the beginning of their second course.

FEES.

Matriculation (paid but once) $ 5.00

For the Course (Demonstrators' Ticket included) . . 100.00

Dissecting Fee (optional) 10.00

Diploma Fee 30.00

For further information, address

C. N. PEIRCE, Dean, 1415 Walnut St., Philadelphia.

Board can be obtained at from $4.00 to $6.00 per week.

All the Instruments and Tools required can be procured for from $35.00 to $45.00.

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