Federalist: a Collection of Essays, Written in Favor of the New Constitution ...

Front Cover
C. Scribner, 1865 - 615 pages
 

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Contents

I
1
II
6
III
12
IV
17
V
22
VI
27
VII
34
VIII
41
XLIII
306
XLIV
316
XLV
323
XLVI
331
XLVII
340
XLVIII
347
XLIX
352
L
356

IX
48
X
55
XI
64
XII
73
XIII
80
XIV
83
XV
90
XVI
100
XVII
107
XVIII
112
XIX
119
XX
126
XXI
132
XXII
138
XXIII
150
XXIV
156
XXV
162
XXVI
168
XXVII
176
XXVIII
181
XXIX
186
XXX
192
XXXI
198
XXXII
208
XXXIII
215
XXXIV
220
XXXV
229
XXXVI
236
XXXVII
245
XXXVIII
256
XXXIX
264
XL
274
XLI
286
XLII
295
LI
363
LII
369
LIII
376
LIV
382
LV
389
LVI
394
LVII
401
LVIII
408
LIX
414
LX
421
LXI
426
LXII
434
LXIII
444
LXIV
451
LXV
458
LXVI
465
LXVII
470
LXVIII
475
LXIX
484
LXX
494
LXXI
500
LXXII
506
LXXIII
514
LXXIV
517
LXXV
523
LXXVI
530
LXXVII
536
LXXVIII
546
LXXIX
549
LXXX
557
LXXXI
569
LXXXII
574
LXXXIII
592
LXXXIV
605

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Page 265 - Philadelphia for the sole and express purpose of revising the Articles of Confederation and reporting to Congress and the several legislatures such alterations and provisions therein as shall when agreed to in Congress and confirmed by the States render the Federal Constitution adequate to the exigencies of Government and the preservation of the Union.
Page 170 - That the raising or keeping a standing army within the kingdom in time of peace, unless it be with consent of parliament, is against law.
Page 336 - In the government of this Commonwealth, the legislative department shall never exercise the executive and judicial powers, or either of them : the executive shall never exercise the legislative and judicial powers, or either of them : the judicial shall never exercise the legislative and executive powers, or either of them: to the end it may be a government of laws and not of men.
Page 484 - Energy in the Executive is a leading character in the definition of good Government.
Page 339 - that the legislative, executive, and " judiciary departments, shall be separate and distinct ; so that " neither exercise the powers properly belonging to the other...
Page 344 - An elective despotism was not the government we fought for, but one which should not only be founded on free principles, but in which the powers of government should be so divided and balanced among several bodies of magistracy, as that no one could transcend their legal limits, without being effectually checked and restrained by the others.
Page 292 - The better to secure and perpetuate mutual friendship and intercourse among the people of the different States in this Union, the free inhabitants of each of these States, paupers, vagabonds and fugitives from justice excepted, shall be entitled to all privileges and immunities of free citizens...
Page 539 - ... as nothing can contribute so much to its firmness and independence as permanency in office — this quality may, therefore, be justly regarded as an indispensable ingredient in its constitution, and in a great measure as the citadel of the public justice and the public security. The complete independence of the courts of justice is peculiarly essential in a limited constitution.
Page 339 - Convention which passed the ordinance of government, laid its foundation on this basis, that the legislative, executive and judiciary departments, should be separate and distinct, so that no person should exercise the powers of more than one of them at the same time.
Page 62 - Constitution forms a happy combination in this respect ; the great and aggregate interests being referred to the National, the local and particular to the State Legislatures. The other point of difference is, the greater number of citizens and extent of territory which may be brought within the compass of Republican, than of Democratic Government ; and it is this circumstance principally which renders factious combinations less to be dreaded in the former, than in the latter.

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