Introduction to the National Arithmetic: On the Inductive System Combining the Analytic and Synthetic Methods in which the Principles of the Science are Fully Explained and Illustrated : Designed for Common Schools and Academies

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Robert S. Davis & Company, 1859 - Arithmetic - 324 pages

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Page 158 - RULE. — Multiply the numerators together for a new numerator, and the denominators together for a new denominator.
Page 296 - Raise the ratio to a power whose index is equal to the number of terms, from which subtract 1 ; divide the remainder by the ratio, less 1, and the quotient, multiplied by the first term, will be the answer.
Page 187 - To multiply a decimal by 10, 100, 1000, &c., remove the decimal point as many places to the right as there are ciphers in the multiplier ; and if there be not places enough in the number, annex ciphers.
Page 285 - A sphere is a solid, bounded by one continued convex surface, every point of which is equally distant from a point within, called the centre.
Page 287 - ... series. The numbers which form the series are called the terms of the series. The first and last terms are the extremes, and the other terms are called the means.
Page 136 - The greatest common divisor of two or more numbers is the greatest number "that will divide each of them without a remainder. Thus 6 is the greatest common divisor of 12, 18, and 24.
Page 138 - The least common multiple of two or more numbers is the least number that can be divided by each of them without a remainder ; thus 30 is the least common multiple of 10 and 15.
Page 251 - What is the first rule for finding the cost, when the selling price and the gain or loss per cent. are given * The second rule 1 6.
Page 142 - Dividing the numerator and denominator of a fraction by the same number does not alter the value of the fraction.
Page 274 - The square of the sum of two numbers is equal to the square of the first number plus twice the product of the first and second number plus the square of the second number.

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