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“ Estimate of the products, which descended the falls of the Ohio, at Louisville, in the year 1822: being the produce, 1st, of the whole State of Ohio (except the part bordering on Lake Erie); 2dly, of two-thirds of the State of Kentucky; 3dly, of one-half of the State of Indiana ; and 4thly, of a small part of the States of Pennsylvania and Virginia.

Estimated Estimated cost

tons, in dollars.

12,000 hds. Tobacco ...
10,000 - Hams and shoulders green..
12,000 - and boxes of Bacon...

4,000 - Corn meal, kiln dried..,,., 50,000 barrels Pork. ......

4,000 - Beef.... 300,000 - Flour.. 75,000 - - Whiskey ... 5,000 -- - Beans, ...... 3,000 - Cider ......

6,000 -- - Apples ...... 100,000 kegs of Lard .,, 25,000 firkins of Butter...

2,000 bales of Hay,. 2,000 casks Flax seed, 7 bushels to a cask 3,000 barrels Linseed Oil. 5,000 boxes Window Glass ....... 25,000 - Soap . 10,000 Candles ......

3,000 barrels Porter, .. 60,000 lbs. Ginseng. ... 50,000 Bees' wax..., 10,000 kegs Tobacco ... 65,000 lbs. Feathers. ..

7,500 500,000 4,464 | 350,000 2,700 210,000 1,700 24,000 7,000 350,000

538 24,000 27,000 900,000 10,600 1.500,000

450 7,500 4309,000 400 9,000 2,250 250,000 550 | 125,000 350 2,000 360 4,000 400 57,000 200 25,000 5601 75,000 225 50,000

15,000

15,000 22 -12,500 580 60,000 29 16,000

27

“ There are many articles of Export not in. cluded in the above schedule, such as iron castings, salt, gunpowder, whitelead, and other manu. factured articles of various descriptions, the amount of which could not be correctly estimated for want of adequate data. The foregoing estimate presents, at one glance, a pretty correct view of the agricultural resources of this section of the country; and, when it is considered, at the same time, that probably not more than one-fifth of the soil embraced in this calculation is now under cultivation, we are furnished with some general data from which to estimate the ultimate agricultural capacity of this section of the country.”

The above statement as well as the following table was politely furnished me by a gentleman with whom I became acquainted at Louisville.

A Table showing the name and tonnage of each steam-boat,

employed on the Ohio and Mississippi rivers in the year 1823, together with the place when, and the year in which, it was built.

Names of Steam-boats.

1

Where built.

No. tons. When built.

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Alleghany
Alabama
Alexandria
Arkansas
Balize Packet
Belle Creole
Beaver
Cincinnati

Columbus
Co Calhoun

Cumberland
Congresso
Courier
Dolphin
Eagle
Exchange points
Expedition
Eliza del Hotel

51
50 1819

1823
136 1819
157 1818
450 1817
130 1818

1818. 160 1822 119 1820 146 1820 118 1818 212 1818 235 1819 66 | 1821

Cincinnati
New Orleans
Kentucky
Pittsburg
Wheeling
Louisville
Pittsburg
Cincinnati
Louisville
Pittsburg
Cincinnati yo

246

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Names of Steam-boats.

L. Where built.

No. tons. When built.

243

1817 : 150 1821 408 1820 3141819 60 | 1822 263 1822 214 1818

1819

1819 120 | 1822 305 | 1820 124 | 1817 , 118

75 190 | 1819 120 1821 198 1817 102 1818

70 209 1818,

145

1810 1:

Elizabeth
Fidelity

New York
Feliciana wil. Philadelphia
Fayette

Louisville
Florence

Clarksville
Favourite i Pittsburg:
Gen. Clark

Clarksville
Gen. Pike

Cincinnati
Gen. Harrison Louisville
Gen. Neville Pittsburg
Gen. Green Cincinnati
Hecla
Hornet
Hope
Henry Clay Kentucky
Indiana

New Albany
Geo. Madison Pittsburg
Louisiana

New Orleans Leopard

Clarksville ..? Maysville Maysville

Mobile
Manhalhattan New York
Maid of Orleans Philadelphia
Mercury

Steubenville
Missouri

Kentucky
Mandan

Clarksville
Mississippi Mobile
Miami

Cincinnati
Magnet

Louisville
Neptune
Nashville

Cincinnati
Olive Branch Pittsburg
Osage to Cincinnati
Paragon

Cincinnati
Post Boy

New Albany
Providence Kentucky
Pittsburg
Pennsylvania :

Pittsburg
1. Pittsburg and St. Pittsburg

Louis Packet SF
Ramasso

New York
Rifleman ilk |Louisville
• Rocket Radio Louisville
· Rufus Putman Marietta

428
193 1818
15

| 1819.
176

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127
379

30 1822
1801823

50 194 1822 . 312 144 | 1820 355 1819 230 1819 375 -1819 .

120 1823 | 107 | 1823

Pittsburg

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Rob Roy
Robert Fulton
Rambler
Steubenville
Superior
Sciota
Tamerlane
Thomas Jefferson
Telegraph
Teeke
Venture
Vesuvius
Volcano
Vulcan
Velocipede
Virginia
United States

150 307 224

1823 1823 1818 1819 1818

109

295

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Making in all seventy-nine steam-boats. Moreover the number of boats is rapidly increasing, as I saw new ones building at Cincinnati and at several other towns.

When I arrived at Louisville, the water was higher than it had been for some years, and in consequence, some of the largest steam-boats had ascended the rapids, which indeed, whenever there is a freshet, become almost imperceptible.

I had intended going straight on to Birkbeck's Settlement in the Illinois, but postponed this journey, on finding that I could first of all go up to Cincinnati in the “ United States.This Leviathan of the western waters, is of 645 tons burden, and is worked by two very large and powerful en. gines, acting together so as to dispense with the necessity of a fly-wheel. The accommodations op board were really superb; and the great size of the boat, added to the excellent construction of the engines, entirely prevented that tremulous and disagreeable motion, so common in small steam-boats.

The river, in consequence of the rain, presented a most noble appearance, being in many places nearly a mile wide. This majestic sheet of water was marked in the centre by a large black line of drift-wood, formed by quantities of fallen trees, logs, stumps, and branches : for, after a great fall of rain, the small streams and creeks overflow part of the neighbouring woods, and float off all the timber that has fallen, or that has been cut down.

This drift wood coming into the Ohio, forms itself into a line in the most rapid of the stream; and whenever a steam-boat has to cross from one side of the river to the other, generally breaks one or two of the paddles.

Before leaving Louisville, I had been intro duced to a Scotch gentleman, who had long been a resident at New Orleans, and who is one of the first merchants there. He formed one of the party on board, and I found him a most agreeable wellinformed man. He gave me, for instance, a very entertaining account of the island of St. Domingo, which he had visited during the reign of Christophe. This man, he said, though such a tyrant, was in private life extremely mild; and if the state of his dominions had been more settled, would

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