Men in Dark Times

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J. Cape, 1970 - Biography & Autobiography - 288 pages
"Dark times" is Brecht's phrase, and Hannah Arendt uses it not to suggest that those she writes about are "mouthpieces of the Zeitgeist" (none in fact fit such roles), but, rather, that the routine repetitive horrors of our century form the substance of the dark against which their lives of illumination were lived. All the essays, written over a period of years, are concerned with persons--writers who (except Lessing) share the first half of the twentieth century--and only implicitly with issues. Dr. Arendt believes that "Even in the darkest of times we have the right to expect some illumination, and that such illumination may come less from theories and concepts than from the uncertain, flickering, and often weak light that some men and women, in their lives and works, will kindle under almost all circumstances and shed over the time-span that was given them on earth."--Publisher description.

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About the author (1970)

Hannah Arendt (1906-1975) is considered one of the most important and influential thinkers of the twentieth century. A political theorist and philosopher, she is also the author of Crises of the Republic, On Violence, The Life of the Mind, and Men in Dark Times. The Origins of Totalitarianism was first published in 1951.

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