The Roman History: From the Building of Rome to the Ruin of the Commonwealth ...

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C. J. G. and F. Rivington, 1830 - Rome

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Page 228 - ... of all men. Octavius, therefore, must not be entreated to suffer us to live in safety. Do you rather rouse yourself so far as to think that city, in which you have acted the noblest part, free and flourishing, as long as there are leaders still to the people, to resist the designs of traitors'.
Page 367 - Quod principi placuit legis habet vigorem: utpote cum lege regia, quae de imperio eius lata est, populus ei et in eum omne suum imperium et potestatem conferat...
Page 226 - Octavius as to petition him for our safety, you will be thought not to have disliked a master, but to have wanted a more friendly one. As to your praising him for the things that he has hitherto done...
Page 73 - By this evacuation before eating, they were prepared to eat more plentifully ; and by emptying themselves presently after it, prevented any hurt from repletion. Thus Vitellius, who was a famous glutton, is said to have preserved his life by constant vomits, while he destroyed all his companions, who did not use the same caution : (Sueton. 12. Dio.
Page 70 - The work is divided into five books ; the first of which teaches us how to contemn the terrors of death, and to look upon it as a blessing rather than an evil. The second, to support pain and affliction with a manly fortitude. The third and fourth, to moderate all our complaints and uneasiness under the accidents of life.
Page 68 - On my return from Asia, as I was sailing from JEgina towards Megara, I began to contemplate the prospect of the countries around me : ./Egina was behind, Megara before me ; Piraeus on the right, Corinth on the left ; all which towns, once famous and flourishing, now lie overturned, and buried in their ruins...
Page 218 - After the death of Caesar, and those your memorable ides of March, you cannot forget, Brutus, what I declared to have been omitted by you, and what a tempest I foresaw hanging over the republic : you had freed us from a great plague ; wiped off a great stain from the Roman people; acquired to yourselves divine glory...
Page 225 - I killed, what I did not allow to the man himself; nor would suffer, even in my father, were he living — to have more power than the laws and the senate. How can you imagine, that any one can be free under him, without whose leave there is no place for us in that city? or how is it possible for you, after all, to obtain what you ask ? You ask, that he would allow us to be safe.
Page 45 - Oenomaus,1 contain a caution altogether unnecessary. For tell me, my friend, what jealousies can I possibly create? Or who will look with envy upon a man in my humble situation? But granting that I were in ever so enviable a state; yet let me observe, that it is the opinion of those philosophers, who alone seem to have understood the true nature of virtue, that a good man is answerable for nothing farther than his own innocence. Now in this respect I think myself doubly irreproachable: in the first...
Page 136 - The senate met the next morning, to which he was particularly summoned by Antony; but excused himself by a civil message, as being too much indisposed by the fatigue of his journey— Antony took this as an affront, and in great rage threatened openly in the senate to order his house to be pulled down, if he did not come immediately; till by the interposition of the assembly he was dissuaded from using any violence — The...

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