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attend the chief, the race (1) of his native streams. Feeble was his arm against Carthon, he fell; and his heroes fled.

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Carthon stood, on that heathy rock, and faw the heroes approach. He loved the ter— rible joy of his face : and his strength, in the

(1) It appears, from this passage, that clanship was established, in the days of Fingal, though not on the fame footing with the present tribes in the north of Scotland. -

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thou shalt know, that the mark of my sword is in many a field.

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Art thou the king so far renowned, replied the car-borne Carthon Art thou that light of death, that frightens the kings of the world?—But why should Carthon ask * for he is like the stream of his desart; strong as a river, in his course; swift as the eagle of the sky.— O that I had fought with the king ; that my fame might be great in the song! that the hunter, beholding my tomb, might say, he fought with the mighty Fingal. But Carthon dies unknown ; he has poured out his force on the feeble.

(1) This expression admits of a double meaning, either that Carthon hoped to acquire glory by killing Fingal; or to be rendered famous by falling by his hand. The last is the most probable, as Carthon is already wounded, - By

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Joy rose in Carthon's face: he lifted his heavy eyes.—He gave his sword to Fingal, to lie within his flail, that the memory of Balclutha's king might remain on Morven. —The battle É...# along the field , for the bard had sung the song of peace. The chiefs gathered round the falling. Carthon, and heard his words, with . Silent. they leaned on their spears, while Balclutha's hero spoke. His hair fighed in the wind, and his words were feeble,

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