THE LIFE OF ARCHIBALD ALEXANDER, D.D., LL

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Page 294 - Suppose ye that these Galileans were sinners above all the Galileans, because they suffered such things ? I tell you, Nay ; but, except ye repent, ye shall all likewise perish.
Page 57 - The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and a contrite heart, 0 God, Thou wilt not despise.
Page 462 - Jesus can make a dying bed Feel soft as downy pillows are, While on his breast I lean my head, And breathe my life out sweetly there.
Page 462 - Therefore let no man glory in men ; for all things are yours, whether Paul, or Apollos, or Cephas, or the world, or life, or death, or things present, or things to come ; all are yours, and ye are Christ's, and Christ is God's.
Page 314 - And the things that thou hast heard of me among many witnesses, the same commit thou to faithful men, who shall be able to teach others also.
Page 516 - And I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me, Write, Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord from henceforth: Yea, saith the Spirit, that they may rest from their labours; and their works do follow them.
Page 134 - And as they went on their way, they came unto a certain water : and the eunuch said, See, here is water; what doth hinder me to be baptized? And Philip said, If thou believest with all thine heart, thou mayest. And he answered and said, I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God.
Page 111 - Lord God! behold, I cannot speak: for I am a child. But the Lord said unto me, Say not, I am a child : for thou shalt go to all that I shall send thee, and whatsoever I command thee thou shalt speak.
Page 527 - Those that be planted in the house of the Lord: shall flourish in the courts of our God. They shall still bring forth fruit in old age: they shall be fat and flourishing; To show that the Lord is upright; he is my rock : and there is no unrighteousness in him.
Page 191 - The power of Henry's eloquence was due, first, to the greatness of his emotion and passion, accompanied with a versatility which enabled him to assume at once any emotion or passion which was suited to his ends. Not less indispensable, secondly, was a matchless perfection of the organs of expression, including the entire apparatus of voice, intonation, pause, gesture, attitude, and indescribable play of countenance.

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