Money and Its Laws: Embracing a History of Monetary Theories, and a History of the Currencies of the United States

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H. V. and H. W. Poor, 1877 - Banks and banking - 623 pages
 

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Contents

Wholly dependent upon the credit of the issuer
58
The grounds of this preference their beauty and the uses to which they
65
Childishness and absurdity of his illustrations
66
Difference between his method and that of Aristotle
70
Standard value of the coinage to be maintained
79
Amount of their capital and loans note
80
The currency inflated and the remedy convertibility
83
Proposition for a Land Bank
85
Professorships of Political Economy should be suppressed or put into
86
Necessity to social and material progress of some article or articles
90
An imaginary value no value
91
A government currency never flexible as it bears no relation to the means
97
Invention of money impossible
103
Contradictions in which Smith involved himself
111
The standard of value not the instrument by which the exchanges
122
Advantages resulting from the use of the former
129
Mode of its issue
135
Sketch of the history of usury note
143
A person rich in proportion to the amount he holds
150
Importance of an equilibrium of the precious metals the world over
156
The age of Protection the heroic
160
The sneaking arts of underling tradesmen have made England what
166
Were England insulated her currency might as well be paper as coin
172
Stewart a striking example of the weakness and folly of the Schoolmen
181
Issue of notes a right at common law
187
Proper limit of paper money the amount of merchandise to be symbolized
190
Mr Pitt promises compliance
193
Statement showing the value of gold from 1797 to 1821 inclusive note
199
The Bank competent
202
The amount of such currency permanently outstanding increases
208
Repudiation vindicated in Congress by Jacob Thompson
212
Depressed condition of the country
214
a vindication
216
The Principles of Political Economy and Taxation 1817
223
His assumptions wholly opposed to the fact
229
Their value ABSOLUTE depending upon cost alone
235
Price of bullion from 1813 to 1819
241
The latter a great disturbing element in financial affairs
253
Report of the Committee upon the Bank 490
254
If its assets were in bills their payment would return its notes without
259
Hence the condition in which it was placed
266
Extraordinary demands upon the Bank in 1837
272
Causes of the disasters of 1839
280
His ideas of money wholly borrowed from Adam Smith
286
Their ignorance of banking systems of the United States
293
Those of the other have no support but its bills
299
The demand for capital increases as natural laws are unfolded
302
The advantages assumed for the Act wholly imaginary
306
Such loans transfer the actual possession of capital from the owner to
310
THOMAS TOOKE
313
Their total misconception of the principles of the science of Political
355
The highest material welfare the result of the highest moral conditions
361
Issued in proper amounts so long as it can be converted into equal nom
367
Ricardo the central figure of the new school of Economists as Smith of
368
Gold and silver to be demonetized in case of a war as a means of retaining
373
Manual of Political Economy 875
375
Makes no discrimination between different kinds of money 880
381
Apparent imbecility of the Revolutionary Government
389
Without them there could have been neither civilization nor continuity
391
Hence the hatred felt toward them by the latter
400
Mills description of the nature and functions of money borrowed from
409
The value of all currencies depends upon their quality not quantity 56
410
Its action a triumphant vindication of the correctness of the doctrine
419
A R PERRY
422
CURRENCY AND BANKING IN THE UNITED STATES
428
The issues of May 22 1777 and April 11 1778 called
430
The use of gold and silver as money proves them to be capital in a peculiar
433
Absurdity of the illustration
443
Popular discontent
448
Address of Congress to the people
454
Hence the origin of paper money
456
Mischievous effect of the government currency
460
464
464
Local jealousies and rivalries
466
Could derive no advantage from provisions designed to promote the general
471
Illustrations of his opinions upon the nature and powers of our government
477
Charter of the Bank expired March 4 1811
483
General Jacksons first Annual Message declares the Bank unconstitutional
489
Summary of the Report
502
The will or opinion each department of government its rule
509
His prodigious un truthfulness and falsifications of history
517
355
521
222
523
Reasons for General Jacksons attack on the Bank
524
excess
528
Their suspension and resumption
530
125
531
Interests of Banks always in harmony with those of the public
534
Must sustain the Banks of the States
536
Sketch of Banking in the several States
538
The same parties FreeTraders in one country and Protectionists
542
Résumé of the above
562
The suspension of the Banks a precautionary measure
568
Draws the bill for the second issue of notes 673
575
Mr Chases misstatement of history
581
In providing a banking capital makes no distinction between substance
582
Failure of Mr Chases attempt
587
The government notes to be demonetized as the condition of resumption
593
The Independent Treasury to be abolished
618
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