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WITH

Rotes for Emigrants.

COMPREHENDING THE EARLY HISTORY, AN ACCOUNT OF THE INDIANS, SETTLE-
MENT, TOPOGRAPHY, STATISTICS, COMMERCE, TIMBER, MANUFACTURES,
AGRICULTURE, FISHERIES, GEOLOGY, NATURAL HISTORY, SOCIAL
AND POLITICAL STATE, IMMIGRANTS, AND CONTEM-

PLATED RAILWAYS OF THAT PROVINCE.

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FELLOW OF THE GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OF LONDON ; CORRESPONDING MEMBER OF THE
ROYAL GEOLOGICAL SOCIETY OP CORNWALL; MEMBER OF THE LITERARY AND

HISTORICAL SOCIETY OF QUEBEC; CORRESPONDING MEMBER OF THE
ACADEMY OF NATURAL SCIENCES OF PHILADELPHIA; AUTHOR
OP "REMARKS ON THE GEOLOGY AND MINERALOGY

OP NOVA SCOTIA," ETC.

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LONDON: SIMMONDS & WARD,
6, BARGE YARD, BUCKLERSBURY.

1530 Á€ !! Dancien minimo

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LONDON:

PRINTED BY H. I. STEVENS, PHILPOT LANE, FENCHURCH STREET.

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The Author of the Work now submitted to the public was employed by the Government of New Brunswick five years in making a Geological Survey of that Province. During that period, he had the most favourable opportunities of making himself acquainted with the climate, topography and resources of the country, and also with the habits and industry of its inhabitants. His Geological Reports, published by the Provincial Legislature, were necessarily devoted to science, and to the description of the mineral wealth of the Province: the present Work embraces all the information acquired during the performance of the above public service, and will be found to contain, with a brief history, a full description of the Colony.

No previous Work of the kind has ever appeared. New Brunswick formed a part of ancient Acadia, or Nova Scotia, until 1784, when it was made a separate Province; and in the general Histories of North America, it has not been noticed in a degree equal to its present importance and value as a part of Her Majesty's Colonial Possessions.

With but a very imperfect knowledge of the country, some writers have pronounced its climate to be rather unfavourable to the health of Europeans, its seasons too cold for vegetation, and its atmosphere involved in dense fogs. To correct these and similar errors is an object of much importance, and to lay before the British Public, for whom this Work is chiefly designed, a correct account of the Province, the resources of which offer a wide field for Emigration, and the advantageous employment of British capital cannot fail to be useful to the country itself, and to the Empire of which it forms a part.

The value and resources of the British North American Colonies are still imperfectly known: their vast extent, the variety of climate, and the almost unexplored forests, will constantly yield some new and valuable objects of enterprise to which the energies of the redundant population and dormant wealth of the Mother-country may be applied, and thereby increase individual happiness and national prosperity.

Many of the errors that have been committed in negotiations with Foreign States, and in establishing a system of Colonial policy, have arisen from an imperfect knowledge of the Provinces. To extend sound information of all the Colonies is very desirable, and more especially is it so for New Brunswick, of which comparatively little is known on the opposite side of the Atlantic.

Notwithstanding the inhabitants of Great Britain have expended sums almost beyond computation in public improvements both at home and abroad, such is the elevated state of the nation, that she still abounds in wealth, and new sources of riches and prosperity are yearly unfolding themselves to her subjects. Accumulations of money have been to many the origin of uneasiness, and to discover how they may be safely employed has called forth the exercise of much ability and ingenuity. There can be no doubt that the Colonies offer the best and most productive field for the application of the inactive capital of the Parent-country, and also for her overflowing population.

Happily, the value of the British North American Colonies to the Empire is becoming more and more apparent; nor can they be too highly estimated for affording strength and security to the nation, an outlet for her stagnant population and manu

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