Punch, Volumes 112-113

Front Cover
Henry Mayhew, Mark Lemon, Tom Taylor, Shirley Brooks, Francis Cowley Burnand, Owen Seaman
Punch Publications Limited, 1897 - English wit and humor

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Page 59 - Be of good comfort, master Ridley, and play the man. We shall this day light such a candle, by God's grace, in England, as I trust shall never be put out.
Page 49 - In the silence of the night, How we shiver with affright At the melancholy menace of their tone! For every sound that floats From the rust within their throats Is a groan.
Page 132 - The isles of Greece ! the isles of Greece ! "Where burning Sappho loved and sung, — Where grew the arts of war and peace, Where Delos rose, and Phoebus sprung ! Eternal summer gilds them yet, But all, except their sun, is set.
Page 269 - THERE WAS A MAN IN OUR TOWN. There was a man in our town, And he was wondrous wise ; He jumped into a bramble bush, And scratched out both his eyes : And when he saw his eyes were out, With all his might and main He jumped into another bush, And scratched them in again.
Page 60 - Who but must laugh if such a man there be ? Who would not weep if Atticus were he? What though my name stood rubric on the walls, Or plaster'd posts, with claps, in capitals ? Or smoking forth, a hundred hawkers...
Page 102 - Trust not for freedom to the Franks They have a king who buys and sells; In native swords, and native ranks, The only hope of courage dwells: But Turkish force, and Latin fraud, Would break your shield, however broad.
Page 215 - ... explained by a resolution of the 23rd February 1688, "they are introduced to the table between two members, making their obeisances as they go up, that they may be the better known to the...
Page 49 - Too much horrified to speak, They can only shriek, shriek, Out of tune, In a clamorous appealing to the mercy of the fire, In a mad expostulation with the deaf and frantic fire, Leaping higher, higher, higher, With a desperate desire, And a resolute endeavor Now — now to sit or never, By the side of the pale-faced moon.
Page 186 - Breathes there a man, with soul so dead, Who never to himself has said, This is my own, my native land!
Page 261 - BY SARAH GRAND In One Volume, price 6s. Punch. — 'The heroine of The Beth Book is one of Sarah Grand's most fascinating creations. With such realistic art is her life set forth that, for a while, the reader will probably be under the impression that he has before him the actual story of a wayward genius compiled from her genuine diary. The story is absorbing ; the truth to nature in the characters, whether virtuous, ordinary, or vicious, every reader with some experience will recognise.

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