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*) Colna-dona signifies the love of heroes. Colamon, narrow river. Car - ul, dark-eyed. Colamon, the residence of Car-ul, was in the neighbourhood of Agricola's wall, towards the south. Car-ul seems to have been of the race of those Britons, who are distinguished by the name of Maiatae, by the writers of Rome. Maiatae is derived from two Galic words, MoI, a plain, and AITICH, inhabitants; so that the fignification of Maiate is, the inhabitants of the

- plain country; a name given to the Britons, who were settled in the Low - lands, in contradistinction to the Caledonians, (i. e. CAEL-DoN , the Gauls

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Crona, murmuring, was the name of a small stream, which discharged itself in the river Car. rom. It is often mentioned by Ossian, and the scenes of many of his poems are on its banks. — The enemies, whom Fingal defeated here, are not mentioned. They were, probably, the provincial Britons. That traćt of country between the Firths of Forth and Clyde has been, thro' - all antiquity, famous for battles and rencóur

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halls. There dwelt bright Colna dona, the

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"possessed of North - and South-Britain. a town situated there,

Stirling, derives its name from that very circumstance.

It is a corruption of the Galic name, SFRILA, i. e. the bill, or rock, of contention.

ters, between the different nations, who were

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course, Fingal had scattered his foes: he had rolled away the strangers, like a troubled sea. We came to the place of renown: from the mountains descended night. I tore an oak from its hill, and raised a flame on high. I bade my fathers to look down, from the clouds of their hall; for, at the fame of their race, they

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brighten in the wind. . . . . .” t

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after Selma's race have failed! — Prone, from the stormy night, the traveller shall lay him,

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/ of other years!”

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i , *). From Col- amon came a bard, from

o Car-ul, the friend of strangers. He bade us

- to the feast of kings, to the dwelling of bright

o * . - - Colna

* *) The manners of the Bitons and caledonius we

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Germans of his own time) tho' it has staggered - some learned men, is not sufficient to make us believe, that the antient inhabitants of North.

Britain were a German colony. A discussion of

a point |

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