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the steps of his heroes, hunters of the boar. —

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bends from high , like a formless meteor in clouds. He sends abroad the winds, and marks them, with his signs. Starno foresaw , that Morven's king was never to yield in war.

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speaks, with great devotion, of pilgrimage, and more particularly, of the blue-eyed daughters of the convent. Religious, however, as this poet was, he was not altogether decent, in the scenes he introduces between Swaran and the wife of Congcullion, both of whom he represents aS giants. It happening unfortunately, that Congvullion was only of a moderate stature, his wife, without hesitation, preferred Swaran, as a more - adequate match for her own gigantic size. From this fatal preference proceeded so much mischief, that the good poet altogether lost fight of his principal adion; and he ends the piece, with an advice to men, in the choice of their wives, which, however good it may be, I shall leave concealed in the obscurity of the original.

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- his eyes, along the striving fields. His joy was in the fall of men. Blood, to him, was a

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tall Corman-trunar, he from Urlor of streams, dweller of battle's wing.

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We came to roaring Urlor. With his people came tall Corman-trunar. We fought; but the foe prevailed. In his wrath stood Annir of la

kes. He lopped the young trees, with his sword. His eyes rolled red in his rage. I marked the

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*) Bursting into tears, she rose, and tort a lock from her hair; a lock, which wandered, in the blast, along her heaving breast. — Corman-trunar gave the shell; and bade me to rejoice before him. — I rested in the shade of night; and hid my face in my helmet deep. — Sleep descended on the foe. I rose, like - a stalk. *) Ossian is very partial to the fair sex. Even the daughter of the cruel Annir, the sister of the revengeful and bloody Starno, partakes not of those disagreeable charaders so peculiar to her family. She is altogether tender and delicate. Homer, of all ancient poets, uses the sex with least ceremony. His cold contempt is even war. se, than the downright abuse of the moderns; for to draw abuse implies the possession of some

merit,

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