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l is a river in Sweden, fill called Lula, which is probably the same with Iulan. The war between Starno, and Torcul-torno, which termi- mated in the death of the latter, had its rise at a hunting party. Starno being invited, in a friendly manner, by Torcul-torno, both kings, with their followers, went to the Inountains of Stivamor, to hunt. A boar rushed from the

wood before the kings; and Torcul-torno killed

it. "Starno thought this behaviour a breach upon
the privilege of guests, who were always honour-
ed, as tradition expresses it, with the dange;
of the chace. A quarrel arose, the kings cane
to battle, with all their attendants, and the par-
ty of Torcul-torno were totally defeated, and
he himself slain. Starno pursued his vićtory,
laid waste the distria of Crathlun , and , coming
to the residence of Torcul - torno, carried off,
by force, Comban-carglas , the beautiful daugh-
ter of his enemy. Her he confined in a cave,

. . . . near the palace of Gormal, where, on account
... ... of her cruel treatment, she became distraćted.
- "... :- - I ‘The

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in my cave, king of shaggy boars?' Look from . the hall of Loda, on lonely Conban-carglas.

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By a rock , at Lulan's stream, I had pier-ced the bounding roe. My white hand gather. .

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It was Starno, dreadful king! — His red eyes rolled on Comban-carglas. Dark waved his shaggy brow , above his gathered finile, Where is my father, I said, he that was migh

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*) By the beam of youth, it afterwards appears, that

~ Comban-carglas means swaran, the son of Star

mo, with whom, during her confinement, she v had fallen in love. . . . .”

- I 3 '' . - - . . . .

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* , , , . " Fingal,
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w *) From this contrast, which Fingal draws, between

his own nation, and the inhabitants of Scandio via, we may learn, that the former were much less barbarous than the latter. This distinétion is so much observed throughout the poems of Os. fian, that there can be no doubt, that he followed the real manners of both nations in his own time. At the close of the speech. of Fingal, the re is a great part of the original lost.

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*) The sword of Fingal, fo called from its maker . .

Luno of Lochlin,

earth.

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