A Lady's Cruise in a French Man-of-war, Volume 1

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William Blackwood and Sons, 1882 - Missions - 389 pages

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Page 224 - For this commandment which I command thee this day, it is not hidden from thee, neither is it far off. It is not in heaven, that thou shouldest say, Who shall go up for us to heaven, and bring it unto us, that we may hear it, and do it ? Neither is it beyond the sea, that thou shouldest say, Who shall go over the sea for us, and bring it unto us, that we may hear it, and do it ? But the word is very nigh unto thee, in thy mouth, and in thy heart, that thou mayest do it...
Page 173 - And the women answered one another as they played, and said, Saul hath slain his thousands, and David his ten thousands.
Page 211 - Of the early history of this idol no authentic information can be procured, but its power is believed to be immense ; they pray to it in time of sickness, it is invoked when a storm is desired...
Page 162 - It would be difficult to imagine a healthier, happier life, than that of these students. At the first glimmer of the lovely tropical dawn, the college bell rings to mark the hour for household prayer. (There is probably not a house in Samoa where the family do not assemble daily for morning and evening prayer.) Then all the students go out, either to work in the gardens, or to fish in the calm lagoon. At eight the bell rings again to warn them that it is time to bathe and breakfast, to be ready for...
Page 170 - And Jonathan stripped himself of the robe that was upon him, and gave it to David, and his garments, even to his sword, and to his bow, and to his girdle.
Page 159 - You must not infer from my speaking of a college, that Malua bears the slightest resemblance to any collegiate institution in Europe. It is essentially South Sea, which means that it is suitable to the climate and the people, and it consists of a large village...
Page 162 - L due form. This land was reclaimed from the bush by the students themselves, who raise yams, taro, and bananas in abundance, and have also planted several thousand bread-fruit trees, cocoa-palms, and other fruit-bearing trees ; so that this noble institution is almost, if not altogether, self-supporting. From its commencement to the present day, fully two thousand...
Page ii - Which stemmed the studded archipelago, O'er whose blue bosom rose the starry isles ; The healthy slumber, earned by sportive toils ; The palm, the loftiest Dryad of the woods, Within whose bosom infant Bacchus broods, While eagles scarce build higher than the crest Which shadows...
Page 159 - Each cottage is the home of a student with his wife and family, preference in the filling up of vacancies being given to married men, both as a means of educating the women and children, and also because the people, in applying for teachers, generally ask for...
Page 25 - ... roof of a house. There were eleven of these steps, each of which was four feet high, so that the height of the pile was forty-four feet: each step was formed of one course of white coral stone...

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