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may do much; and it will probably be found, that I he progress of vaccination in different parts of I he United Kingdom will be in proportion to that instruction. Were encouragement given to vaccination, by offering it to the poorer classes without exptnee, there is little doubt but it would in ti.ue supersede the inoculation for tiie small-pox ; and thereby various sources of variolous infection would be cut off; but till vaccination becomes general, it will be impossible to prevent the constant recurrence ©j the natural smallpox by means of those who are inoculated; except it should appear proper to the legislative to adopt, in its wisdom, some measure by which those who still, from terror or prejudice, prefer the small-pox to the vaccine disease, may, in thus consulting the gratification of their own feelings, be prevented from doing mischief to their neighbours.

From the whole of the above considerations, the college of physicians feel it their duly strongly to recommend the practice of vaccination. They have been led to this conclusion by no preconceived opinion, .but by the most unbiassed judgment formed from an irresistible weight of evidence which has been laid before them. For when the number, the respectability, the disinterestedness, and the extensive experience of its advocates, is compared with the feeble and imperfect testimonies of its few opposers; and when it is considered tliat many, who were once adverse to vaccination, have been convinced by further trials, and are now to be ranked among its warmest supporters, the truth seems to be established as firmly as the nature of such a question ad

mit s: so that the college of pfe! cians conceive, that the public mi; reasonably look forward, with see? degree of hope, to the time whea »8 opposition shall cease, and the pneral concurrence of mankind sbrf at length be able to put an end» the ravages at bast, if not to tbeo istence, of the small-pox.

Lucas Pepys, President. 10th April, 1807

Small-Pox Inoculation.

It is lamentable to obst-rve, that the small-pox is still suffered lobe propagated by inoculation, fitick tends to disseminate the di>ease ta casual infection; so that at presew, in London alone, twenty-five persoc a week die of that disease; and tlit usual amount of deaths, according!'"' the London bills of mortality, » 2,000 at least.

There are no means of ascerran:ing exactly the number of deplorafc* sufferers, who, though not quite itstroved by the small-pox, are nevertheless grievously afflicted for bfe from that loathsome disease; bst the number rendered blind, lame, scrofulous, deformed, and dis-fioured, is immense, and is estimated much below the truth at three times tte amount of the deaths.

The account then may be furl; stated thus: — Deaths in London alone in

one year from the small

pox •"• 2000

Rendered blind, maimed, or

otherwise diseased,from the

same complaint 6O00

Total sufferers from the small- _. pox in oue year

Now,

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Now, according to the most authentic documents that can be procured, and tho>e documents furnished by men who do not appear to be by any means prejudiced in favour of vaccination, namely, the returns of 164,381 persons vaccinate I, made to the royal college of surgeons; it appears,

That 24 persons, or 1 its 6,81.9 have had inflamed arms.

That 3 persons, or I in 54.793 have died of such inflamed arms.

That 66 persons, or 1 in '2,477 have had eruptions after the cowpi. k.

And that 36 persons, or 1 in 2,917 bave had the small-pox utterwar. is.

Thus, instead of two thousand persons killed by the small-pox, and six thousand tendered miseiuble for life, not a single death would have happened, and only six persons could in any respect have been rendered, uneasy or dissatisfied; and it is universally acknowledged, that such accidents are less likely to occur now than formerly, on account of the improved method of vaccinating generally adopted.

It appears then, that in a given number of cases the advantages of the cow-pock over the small-pox is as 8(100 to 6; consequently, those who submit to the process of vaccination have upwards of thirteen hundred chances to one in their favour.

Founding of Downing' College, Cambridge.

Sir George Downing, bart. of Gamlingay Park, in the county of Cambridge, in the year 1717, devwed all his valuable estates m the counties of Cambridge, Bedford, and Suffolk, to bis nearest relations, being first cousins, &c. to each for life, with remainder to their issue in succession; and in case they all died without issue, he devised those estates to trustees, who, with the consent and approbation of the archbishops of Canterbury and York, and the masters of St. John's and Clare Hall, should found a college within the university ot Cambridge, which should be called Downing College. 1

Sir (jeorge died in 17-1.9; and, upon the death of sir Jacob Garrat Downing, in 1764, without issue, the rest of sir George's relations named in his will being also then dead without issue, the estates devised were claimed by the university for the use of the intended college.

The validity of sir George Down* ing's will, after many years litigation, was at length established: and the charter for the iucorpoiation of Downing College having been fully examined and considered by the lords of the privy council, and their recomiiieiidatiou of it being confirmed by his majesty's express approbation, the great seal was affixed to it by lord chancellor Loughborough, Oh the 22d of September, 1800.

Crremonial

Ceremonial observed on laying the Foundation-Stone of Doming 01lege, on Monday, May 18, 1807.

An excellent sermon upon the oc- which the members of the nnrmsiy casion was preached at St. Mary's assembled at the senate-boast, where church, by the Rev. Dr. Outram, Mr. William Frere, fellow of Downpublic orator of the university, at ing College, delivered a suitable eleven o'clock in the forenoon; after speech in latin.

At a quarter before one
THE PROCESSION

left the Senate-House for the Site of the College,
(a commodious Piece of Ground near the Botanic Garden) in

THE FOLLOWING

ORDER: —

ESQUIRE BEDELLS;

THE VICE-CHANCELLOR IN HIS ROBES;

HIGH STEWARD OF THE UNIVERSITY;
COMMISSARY OF THE UNIVERSITY;

Noblemen, in their Robes, two and two;

Doctors in Divinity, in Robes, two aud two;

Doctors of Law and Physic, in Robes, two and two;

PUBLIC ORATOR;

Professors of the University;

Proctors, in their Congregation Habits, followed by their men, with tb»

University Statutes;

Public Registrar, and Public Librarians;

Texors, Scrutators, and other Officers of the University;

THE MASTER OF DOWNING COLLEGE;

Chaplain;

Professors of Downing College;

Architect;

Bachelors of Divinity, and Masters of Arts, two and two;

Fellow-Commoners, two and two;

Bachelors of Arts;

Under Graduates.

When the procession arrived at The stone contained the bet the site of Downing College, Dr. collection of coins of the presort Annesley, the master of Downing, reign that could be procured; witk deposited the foundation-stone, and the first stereotype plate cast in the made an oration in latin. Dr. Ou- foundry of the university, on the tram then pronounced a benediction, improved principle of earl StanhopeAfter this ceremony, the procession The following is an exact copy of returned in the same order to the the inscription, which is very handsenate-house, aud then dispersed to somely engraved on copper, and their several colleges. sunk in the foundation-stone:—

COLLEGIUM

COLLEGIVM T DOWNINGENSE
IN . ACADEMIA . CANTABRIGLE
GEORGIVS . DOWNING . DE . GAML1NGAY .
EODEM . COMITATV

BARONETTVS

TESTAMENTO . DESIGNAVIT

OPIBUSgUE . MUNIFICE . INSTRVIT

ANNO . SALVTIS . M.DCC.XV II.

RECIA . TANDEM . CHARTA . STABILIV1T

CEOKOIVS . TERTIVS . OPTIMVS . PRINCEPS

ANNO . M.DCCC

HJ'.C . VERO . JEDIFICII . PRIMORDIA

XV . CALEND . JVN . ANNO . M.DCCC.VII

MAGISTER . PROPKSSORES . ET . SOCll

REGIO . JVSSV . CONSTITVTI

POSVERVNT

gUOD . AD . RELIGIONIS . CULTUW

JURIS . ANGLICAN . ET . MEDICINJK . SCIENTIAM

ET . AD . RECTAM . JVVENTVTIS . INGENViK

DISCIPUNAM . PROMOVENDAM

FEUCITER . EVEN I AT.

IN

After the ceremony, the new master entertained the principal members of the university with an excellent dinner at the Red Lion inn.

The present collegiate body, appointed by the charter of Downing College, are as follow:

Master. Francis Annesley, LL.D. member of St. John's, and late member of parliament for Reading, in Berkshire. Appointed 1800.

Professor of the Laws of England. Edward Christian, M. A. member of St. John's.

Professor of Medicine. Busick Harwond, M. D. professor of anatomy, and member of Emanuel.

Fellows. John Lens, M. A. member of St. Jolin's; Win, Meek, M.*\. of Emanuel; Win. Freere, M. A. of Trinity.

Besides the above, a professor of medicine, thirteen fellows, six scholars, at 501. per annum, for four years, two chaplains, a librarian, and other officers, will be appoiuted, with adequate salaries.

A member of a Scotch university, with certain qualifications, is eligible to be a professor of medicine at this college.

The annual salary of the master is fjOOl. of a professor 2001. of a fellow 1001. or in that proportion.

Anecdote of his Majesty.

The late sir Lionel Darell having occasion for a few feet of land to build green-houses to his residence at Richmond, which was so close to the wall of Richmond Park tliat

there was no possibility of making the proposed improvement without obtaining a grant from the crown, of such proportion of the park as was necessary for the building, applied to the lords of the treasury and the commissioners of crown

lands.

lands, for the accommodation, for which he was willing to pay any thing that could he reasonably required. The business, however, proceeded but slowly. The lords of the treasury and the commissioners of the crown lands were at a loss how to act with respect to making the grant at all, there being no precedent except in ihc spontaneous acts ot his majesty in the exercise of his royal bounty. The space required by sir Lionel Darell was, besides, so small, that it was hardly worth setting a value upon it; and it could not be granted gratis without an application to the king, which ministers seldom like to make, unless they have some particular object to answer. Sir Lionel being anxious to complete his improvement*, and seeing no way out of the endless labyrinth of solicitation at the treasury, and at the office of the crown lands, resolved at length to apply to his majesty directly in person. Accordingly, the next day of his majesty's passing that way, on his graciously stopping to speak with sir Lionel, as lie usually did, sir Lionel took the opportunity of slating to his majesty the difficulty he laboured under, and that the only possibility of relieving it was tlie grant of a few feet of land from the park. His majesty immediately said, with his usual warmth of beneficence, "Certainly, sir Lionel, certainly, yon shall have it bv all means." His majesty then gut off his horse, and said, "how much do you want, sir Lionel?" Sir Lionel having pointed out the quantity he had occasion for, which was but a very small space, his majesty exclaimed, "Very little indeed, sir Lionel; are you sure it wiJI be enough? do not stint yourself." Sir Lionel assured his ma

jesty that he had pointed out the full extent of his want, and that his majesty's gracious and liberal compliance could not induce him to abuse his royal bounty by extending his demand any further. "Well, then,'' said his majesty, "let us make a mark;" and his majesty accordingly took a slick, and drew a line round the extent that sir Lionel had marked out. "There, sir Lionel, that is vour ground; it is mine no longer." His majestv then mouuled his horse and rode off; leaving sir Lionel no less penetrated with gratitude for his majesty's easy compliance with his request, than with admiration and love for the trulv bountiful and cordially beneficent manner in which that compliance had been expressed.

Customs of tkt Coicular, near Coimbetore.

[From Dr. Buchanan's Journey from Madras, Uirough Mysore, Cuiara, and Malabar.]

The Natami Carun, or hereditary chief, of the Coicular weavers here, informs me, that in this tribe there arc the following divUions; namely, Sirilali, Tatayuatar, and Conga, to which last he belongs. In oilier districts other divisions are kuown; at Sati-mangalam, for instance, they are divided into Chola, Culcundo, Murdea, and Conga. There the hereditary chief is a Murdea. Those divisions do not intermarry, but can eat in common. As the Coicular never marry persons of the same family in the male line with themselves, their marriages are confined to a few families, whose descents are known to each other. The men may many sewal wives, aud the women continue

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