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•gain made to prejudice the public mind against them.

We, therefore, English Uomancatholic*, whose names are hereunder written, beg leave again to solicit the. attention of our couu. try men, uhd to lay before :hcm the following unanswered and unanswerable documents of the purity and integrity of the religious and titil principles uj ALL his majesty's Roman-cathulic sufjects, in respect to their king ami their country.

We entreat you to peruse them; and when you have perused them, tod.iijre—•' W hether his majesty's Roman-catholic subjects maintain a tingle tenet, inconsistent with the purest loyalty; or interfering in the slightest degree, with any or.e duty which an Englishman owes his God, his king, or his country .'" I.—The Hrst Document we present

to you is,—The oath and decla. ration prescribed by the British

parliament of the 31st of his

present majesty, and which is

taken by all English catholics.

"/ A. B. do hereby declare, that I do profess the Uomau-caiholic religion.

'• 1 A. B. do sincerely promise and swear, that I will be faithful and bear true allegiance- to his ma. jesly king George the Third, and him Hill defend to the utmost of my power against all conspiracies and attempts whatsoever that .shall be made against his person, crown, or dignity; and 1 will do my utmost endeavour to disclose and make known to his majesty, his heirs and successors, all treasons and traitorous conspiracies which may be formed against him or them; and 1 do faithfully promise to maintain, support, aud defend, to the utmost of my power, the suc

cession of tl'e crown; which succession, by an act, intiiled, 'An act for tht: further liinita ion of the crown, and better seeming the rights aud liberties of the subject,' is, and stands limited to the princess Sophia, electrcs, and duchess dowager of Hanover, and the heirs of her body, being Protestant-; hereby utterly renouncing and abjuring .any obedience or allegiance unto any oilier person claiming or pretending a right to the crown of these realms. Ahd 1 do swear, that I do reject and detest as an unchristian ai.d impious position, that it is lawful to murder or de, stroy any person or persons whatsoever, for, or under pretence of, their being heretics or infidels; and also that unchristian and impious principle, that faith is not to be kept with heretics or infidels; aud I further daciarc, that it is not an article of my faith; and that J. do renounce, reject, and abjure the opinion, that princes excommunicated by the pope and council, or any authority of the see of Home, or by any authority whatsoever, may be deposed or murdered by their subjects, or any person whatsoever: and I do promise, that 1 will not hold, maintain, or abet any such opinion, or any other opinions contrary to what is expressed in this declaration : and I do declare, that I do not believe that the pupc of Rome, or any other foreign prince, prelate, state, or potentate, hath, or ought la have, any temporal or civil jurisdiction, power, superio. ifv, or pre-eminence, directly or indirectly, within this realm; aud 1 do solemnly, in the presence of God, profess, testify, and declare, that I do make this declaration, and Kr* every

every part thereof, in the plain and ordinary sense of the words of this oath, without any evasion, equivocation, or mental reservation whatever, and without any dispensation already granted by the pope, or any authority of the see of Koine, or any person whatever, and without thinking that I am, or can be, acquitted before God or man, or absolved of this declaration, or any part thereof, although the pope, or any other person or authority whatsoever, shall dispense with, or annul the same, or declare that it was null or void.

"So help me God." IT.—The next documents we present to you are—The o.iths and declarations prescribed by the acts of the Irish parliament to Irish Roman-catholics. 1 he first is the oath of allegiance and declaration, prescribed by the Irish act of the 13th and 14th of his present majesty, and is taken by all Irish Roman-catholics. « / A. B. do take Almighty God, and his only Son Jesus Christ, my Redeemer, to witness that 1 will be faithful and bear true allegiauce to our most gracious sovereign lord king George the Thirds and him will defend to the utmost of my power, against all conspiracies and attempts whatsoever that shall be made against his person, crown, and dignity; and I will do my utmost endeavour to ilisclose and make known to his majesty and his heirs, all treasons and traitorous conspiracies, which may be formed against him or them; and I do faithfully promise to maintain, sup. port, and defend, to the utmost of my power, the succession of the crown in his majesty's family, against any person or persons what

soever; hereby utterly renouncing and abjuring any obedience or alie. giance unto the person taking upon himself the stile and title of prince of Wales, in the life-time of his father, and who since his death is said to have assumed the stile and title of king of Great Britain and Ireland, by the name of Charlw the Third, and to any other person claiming, or pretending a right to the crown of these realms; and I do swear that I do reject and detest, as unchristian and impious to be, lieve, that it is lawful to murder or destroy any person or persons whatsoever, for or under the pre. tence of their being heretics; and also that unchristian and impiou principle* that no faith is to be kept with heretics: I further declare, that it is no article of my faith, and that 1 do renounce, reject, and ab. jure, the opinion that princes excommunicated by the pope and council, or by any authority of the see of Rome,, or by any authority whatsoever, may be deposed or murdered by their subjects, or by any person whatsoever; and I do promise that 1 will not hold, maintain, or abet, any such opinion, or any other opinion contrary to what it expressed in this declaration; and I do declare that I do not believe that the pope of Rome, or any other foreign prince, prelate, state, or potentate, hath, or ought to have, any temporal or civil jurisdiction, power, superiority, or pre-eminence, directly or indirectly, within this realm ; and I do solemnly in the presence of God, and of his only Sen Jesus Christ, my Redeemer, profess, testify, and declare, that I do make this declaration, and every part thereof, in the plain and ordinary cense of the

words

*ords of this oath, without any •tision, equivocation, or mental reservation whatever, and without any dispensation already granted by the pope, or any authority of the see of Rome, or any person what, ever, and without thinking that I am, or can be acquitted before God or roan, or absolved of this declaration, or any part thereof, although the pope, or any other person or persons or authority whatsoever, shall dispense with or annul the same, or declare that it was null and void from the beginning.

"So help me God."

The next is the oath and dccla. ration prescribed by the Irish act of the 33d of his present majesty, and is taken by all Irish Roman-catholics, wishing to entitle themselves to the beunfit of that act:—

"/ A. B. do hereby declare, that I do profess the Roman-catholic religion."

• "/ A. B. do swear that I do abjure, condemn, and detest, as unchristian and impious, the prin. ciple, that it is lawful te murder, destroy, or any ways injure any persons whatsoever, for or under the pretence of being a heretic; and I do declare solemnly before God, that I believe, that no act in itself unjust, immoral, or wicked, can ever be justified or excused, by or under pretence or colour that it was done either for the good of the church, or in obedience to any ecclesiastical power whatsoever. I also declare, that it is not an article of the catholic faith, neither an I thereby required to believe or profess, that the pope is infallible, or that I am bound to obey any or. der, in its own nature immoral, (hough the pope, or any ecclesiastical power, should issue or direct

such order; but, on the contrary, I hold that it would be sinful in me to pay any respect or obedience thereto. 1 further declare that I do not believe, that any sin com* initted by me, can be forgiven, at the mere will of any pope, or any priest, or of any person or persons whatsoever, but that sincere sorrow for past sins, a firm and sincere resolution to avoid future guilt, and to atone to God, arc previous and indispensable requisites to establish a well-founded expectation of for. giveness; and that any person who receives absolution without these previous requisites, so far from ob. taining thereby any remission of his sins, incurs the additional guilt of violating a sacrament; and I do swear that I will defend, to the ut. termost of my power, the settle, ment and arrangement of property in this country, as established by the laws now in being. 1 do hese. by disclaim, disavow, and solemnly abjure, any intention to subvert tho present church establishment, for the purpose of substituting a catholic establishment in its stead; and I do solemnly swear, that I will not exercise any privilege to which I am, or may become entitled, to disturb and weaken the Protestant religion and Protestant government in this kingdom.

"So help me God." Such arc the principles which his majesty's Roman.catholic subjects have publicly and solemnly declared and professed on oath. There is not, in any of them, a single prin. ciple, which every Roman.catholic subject of his majesty does not profess, or which, if his king and country required it, he would not think it his duty te seal with his blood.

III.—h

III.—In the year 1788, a committee of the English catholics waited on Mr. Pitt, respecting their ap. plication for a repeal of the pc. nal laws.—He requested to be furnished with authentic evidence of the opinions of the Roman-catholic clergy and the Koman.catholic universities abroad, " on the existence and extent of the pope's dispensing power."--Three questions were accordingly framed, and sent to the universities of Paris, Louvain, Alcala, Doway, Salamanca, and Valadolid, for their opinions. The questions proposed to them, were,

1. Has the pope, or cardinals, or any body of men, or any individual of the church of Home, any civil authority, power, jurisdiction, or pre-eminence whatsoever, within the realm of England?

2. Can the pope, or cardinals, or any body of men, or any individual of the church of Rome, absolve or dispense his majesty's subjects from their oath of allegiance, upon any pretext whatsscver f

3. Is there any principle in the tenets of'the catholic faith, by which, catholics are justified in not keeping faith with heretics, or other persons differing frc.ni them in religious opinions, in any transaction, either of a public or a private nature?

The universities answered unanimously,

1. That the pope, or cardinals, or any body of men, er any individual of the church of Rome, has not any civil authority, power, jurisdiction, or pre-eminence whatsoever, within the realm of England, 2. That the pope, or cardinals, or any body of men, or any individual of the church of Rome, cannot absolve or dispense his majesty's

subjects from their oath of all'. giancc, upon any pretext whatsoever. ,

3. That there is no principle in the tenets of the catholic faith, by which catholics are justified in not keeping faith with heretics, or other persons differing from them in religious opinions, in any transaction] either of a public or a private nature.

As soon as the opinions of the foreign universities were received, they were transmitted to Mr. Pitt; but we earnestly lieg of yon to observe, that it was for his satisfaction, not ours, that these opinions were taken. Assuredly, his majesty's Roman.catholic subjects did not want the wisdom of foreign uuiv«r. sities to inform them, that his ma. jesty is the lawful sovereign of all his Roman.catholic subjects, *nJ that, by every divine and human law, his Roman-catholic subject! owe him true, dutiful, active, and unreserved allegiance.

Such, then, fellow countrymen and fellow subjects—such being our religious and civil principles in respect to our king and our country—Let us now agaiu ask you,— Is there in them a single tenet, which is incompatible with the purest loyalty, or which, in the slightest degree, interferes with the duty we owe to God, our king, or our country?

Hut,—are these principles really instilled into us? Do our actions correspond with them ?—In reply, we ask,—Are there not, at thi» very moment, thousands of his majesty's Roman.catholic subjecti, who daily and hourly make the most heroic exertions and sacrifices in those fleets and armies, to whose patieut and adventurous courage it b owing, tbat we are still blessed with a king and a country?

Now th n, fellow-countrymen a.irt fellow subjects, be adored, that among these heroic and inestimable d fenders and supporters of their king and their country, there is not one, whose parents, and *bose priests, have not taught him, tbat loyalty is a religious, as much is a civil duly; and (hat, when he is fighting tor his Wing and his country, lie is pcriorming a duty to his God.

(>isned)

John Douglass, D. D. vie. ap. Lorul.

Shrewsbury.

Petre. •

Dormer.

Hon. Chas. EngleSeld.

Wm. Jerninuham.

John Throckmorton.

Thomas Gage.

George Jerningham.

Marmaduke Laugdale.

John Webbe Weston.

Francis Canning.

Charles Bcllasyse, D. D.

Wm. Sheldon.

Charles Conolly.

George Silvcrtop.

John Charlton.

James Langdale.

Richard Kilby Cox.

John Collins, D. D.

J^awrence Nihtll, M. D.

Charles Butler.

Michael Ann.

Wm. Throckmorton.

Thomas Lloyd.

J. liew, U. D.

Richard l.-jtler.

Charles Fairfax.

Brian Salvin.

John Webbe Weston, jm.

James Whcble.

Thomas Stapleton.

Ralph Riddel).
George Caiy.
John Cary.
Edward Blount.
William Cruise.
Edward Jerningham.
Charles Horny hold.
Thomas Walmesley.
John Prujean.
Francis Cholmeley.
Francis Witham.
Henry Iliuldlustone.
Francis Eyre.
John Green ham.
M. Constable Maxwell.
Robert Clittord.
Robert Rookwood Gag*.
Thomas Wright.
Nicholas Selby.
Anthony Wright.
John Wright.
Thomas Wright, jun.
Thomas Thorpe.
John Gabb.
James Yorkc Brans ton.
Edward Wright.
Edward Walsh.

Finance Report.

The financ? report, which Mr. Giles was ready to present to the house of commons on the last day of the last session of parliament, when the usher of the black rod unexpectedly presented himself, and the session was closed by a prorogation, has been printed and laid before the house of commons. The principal poiut and feature of it is as follows:

"The evidence received during the last session, contains an account of two transactions in the payoffice, of a most irregular and improper kind, which were disclosed on the examination of Mr. Thomas, accountant in that office: by whom

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