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CHAPTER 181, LAWS OF 1917, REAPPROPRI

ATED FROM CHAPTER 728, LAWS OF 1915

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$66 63
13,936 08 $9,602 86
16,427 01 6,620 80

Lapsed.

$66 63 4,333 22

9,806 21 Lapsed.

442 52 1,028 68

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2,839 74

62,000 00 4,000 00 3,500 00

CHAPTER 181, LAWS OF 1917, REAPPROPRI

ATED FROM CHAPTER 727, Laws of 1915
Addition to boiler house.
Engine for dynamo.
Farm barn...

61,909 55 45,051 06
4,000 00
3,500 00

16,858 49 4,000 00

3,500 00 Lapsed.

935 12

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5,000 CO 7,500 00 10,000 CO 7,500 00 7,500 00 2,500 00 1,000 00

CHAPTER 646, LAWS OF 1916
Repairs “AA”
Filter and water purification plant...
Elevated water tank..
Equipment for cottage.
Equipment for hospital.
Additional laundry equipment.
Farm equipment.

3,601 53

48 15 4,827 10 6,317 87 3,694 17 2,303 54

1,398 47 7,451 85 5,172 90 1,182 13 3,805 83

196 46 308 77

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448 46

139 69

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7,500 00 5,000 00 18,000 00 15,000 00

7,500 00 52,000 00

CHAPTER 181, LAWS OF 1917
Repairs “ A"
Repairs to old boilers
Two new boilers..
Stokers for boilers, etc.
Filter and water purification plant..
Cottage for inmates .

15 75
17 25

7,500 00 5,000 00 17,984 25 14,982 75

7,500 00 52,000 00

STATEMENT OF SPECIAL FUNDS JUNE 30, 1917

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Additional laundry equipment.
Elevated water tank....
Equipment for cottage.
Equipment for hospital.
Farm equipment...
Filter and water purification plant
Repairs “ AA
Addition to boiler house.
Engine for dynamo.
Farm barn.
Conduits, sewer mains, etc.
Hospital...
One cottage.
Cottage for inmates.
Filter and water purification plant.
Repairs “ A
Repairs to old boilers.
Stokers for boilers, etc..
Two new boilers...

* Covered by contract.

NICHOLAS L. McDONALD,

Treasurer.

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT

To the Board of Managers, State Custodial Asylum, Newark,

New York: LADIES AND GENTLEMEN.-- I beg to submit in accordance with your by-laws, the following report of the operations of this institution for the year ending June 30, 1917. On July 1, 1916, our census was 855. During the

During the year, 41 were admitted; 31 discharged, and there were 9 deaths, making our census, June 30, 1917, 856.

Of the 41 women admitted, the chronological ages were as follows:

of age.

years of

of age.

1 was 12

years

of

age. 6 were 16 years of age. 5 were 17

years 4 were 18 years

of

age. 2 were 19

age. 4 were 20

years

of

age. 2 were 21 years of age. 3 were 22

years

of

age. 1 was 24

years 1 was 25

years

of

age. 3 were 26 years of age. 1 was 28 years

of

age. 1 was 29 years of age. 1 was 30 years of age. 1 was 31 31 years

of 1 was 34 years 1 was 36 years of age. 1 was 37 years of age. 1 was 40 years age. 1 was 49 years of age. 28 being under 25 years of age.

age.

of age.

of

They showed mental ages, as follows:

2 with mental age of 4 years.
3 with mental age of 5 years.
6 with mental

age
of 6

years.
4 with mental age of 7 years.
5 with mental age of 8 years.
5 with mental age of 9 years.
7 with mental age of 10 years.
7 with mental age of 11 years.
2 with mental age of 12 years.
There were sixteen court commitments during the year.

Of the 41 women admitted, 7 were married and had given birth to twenty-four legitimate and seven illegitimate children. The 34 single women admitted had given birth to nine illegitimate children.

Of the 31 women discharged, seventeen had passed out of the child bearing period. One was discharged after a writ of habeas corpus. Six were transferred by their county authorities to other institutions, to make room for younger women. Six were placed in private homes; and one became insane and was transferred to the State Hospital for the Insane.

Of the nine deaths, the causes were as follows: Pulmonary tuberculosis

...

5 Cerebral apoplexy

1 Hypertrophy of thyroid gland.

1 Influenza.

1 Status epilepticus

1

.

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More and more are we impressed, as we study further the problem of the mentally sick, of the urgent need of a more comprehensive and definite policy for dealing with all classes of the mentally sick including the insane, the feeble-minded and epileptic. As a first step, there should be provided a State Department of Mental Hygiene. This department should be in charge of a competent commissioner, as is the State Department of Health, and be organized with divisions in much the same way as the State Department of Health. The State should then he divided into mental hygiene districts, with a superintendent in charge of each district. The advantages of this would be that all classes of the mentally sick would be under closer supervision. The institutions for caring for the mentally sick, while a necessary part of the work, are not the most important. The determination of those who are mentally defective or needing care, especially among the school children, the proper arrangement for their care and treatment; and the matter of their proper supervision after they have received treatment in some special class or institution, are the important things that can best be met by working in a district much smaller than the whole State. And it is to be hoped that the State Hospital Development Commission may not rest from its labors until some such definite plan is laid before the Legislature.

Owing to the advanced cost of materials and labor, our per capita cost for maintenance for the year came up to $167.00, and the probabilities are that there will be a further advance for the next fiscal year. However, we are making every effort, consistent with the best care of our inmates, to keep our maintenance expenditures at the lowest possible limit.

To keep such a large family contented is a task well nigh beyond possibility. And inasmuch as they are all children in mind, entertainment plays a large part in making them as happy as we may. And during the year, the following entertainments were provided:

1916 July 4. The usual celebration. July

12. 160 honor girls went to Sodus. July 19. 160 honor girls went to Sodus. July 26. Sewing room girls' picnic. July 31. Birthday party in charge of Miss Barkholdt. July Girls had supper in the park once a week. Aug 8. 340 honor and blue ribbon girls attend the Chau

tauqua Band Concert. Aug 9. Miss Dillon, reader. Miss Moore and Mrs. Covken

dall gave an entertainment. Aug. 10. Mr. McKay, story-teller, gave an entertainment at

1:30 P. M.

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