The Sorrows of Werter:: A German Story, Volume 2

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Page 149 - All night I stood on the shore. I saw her by the faint beam of the moon. All night I heard her cries. Loud was the wind; the rain beat hard on the hill. Before morning appeared, her voice was weak. It died away, like the evening breeze among the grass of the rocks.
Page 152 - The flower hangs its heavy head, waving, at times, to the gale. Why dost thou awake me, O gale, it seems to say, I am covered with the drops of heaven? The time of my fading is near, and the blast that shall scatter my leaves.
Page 149 - I saw her by the faint beam of the moon. All night I heard her cries. Loud was the wind ; and the rain beat hard on the side of the mountain. Before morning appeared, her voice was weak. It died away, like the evening breeze among the grass of the rocks.
Page 150 - Half v.evvlefs, they walk in mournful conference together. Will none of you fpeak in pity ! They do not regard their father!
Page 162 - Albert is your hufband; but what of that? It is for this life only. — And in this life only it is a crime to love you, to...
Page 182 - This knot of ribband is to be buried with me; you gave it: to me on my birth-day. — Be at peace ; let me entreat you be at peace ! — They are loaded — the clock ftrikes twelve 1 go.— Charlotte— ! Charlotte ! Farewell ! Farewell...
Page 179 - it as I went out and came in. I have wrote a note to your father, to beg he will protect my remains. At the corner of the church-yard, which looks towards the fields, there are two lime-trees ; it is there I wifti to reft ; this is in your father's father's power, and he will do it for his1 friend.
Page 93 - I don': love vain clifputes on fubjefls which we are all equally ignorant of. What is the deftiny of man ? — to fill up the meafure of his fufferings, and drink up the bitter draught.
Page 114 - It was a world of sensibility encouraged and heightened into unreality. it was a gloomy and awful sight! the moon was behind a cloud, but by means of a few scattered rays I could perceive the foaming waves rolling over the fields and meadows, and beating against the bushes; the whole valley was a stormy sea, tossed by furious winds. The moon then appeared again, and rested on a dark cloud; the splendor of her light increased the disorder of nature.
Page 169 - Charlotte's distress. AS soon as Albert had read the note, he turned coldly to his wife, and said, " Give him the pistols—I wish him a good journey.

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