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Where'er the green-winged linnet sings,

The primrose bloometh lone ;
And love it wins—deep love—from all

Who gaze its sweetness on.
On field-paths narrow, and in woods,

We meet thee near and far,
Till thou becomest prized and loved,

As things familiar are!

The stars are fair at even-tide,

But cold, and far away;
The clouds are soft in summer time,

But all unstable they :
The rose is rich—but pride of place

Is far too high for me
God's simple common things I love

My primrose, such as thee!
I love the fireside of my home,

Because all sympathies,
The feelings fond of every day,

Around its circle rise.
And while admiring all the flowers

That summer suns can give,
Within my heart the primrose sweet
In lonely love doth live.

Robert Nicoll.

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AN EMBLEM. I wandered lonely as a cloud That floats on high o'er vales and hills, When all at once I saw a crowd, A host, of golden daffodils; Beside the lake, beneath the trees, Fluttering and dancing in the breeze. Continuous as the stars that shine And twinkle on the milky way, They stretched in never-ending line Along the margin of a bay: Ten thousand saw I at a glance. Tossing their heads in sprightly dance. The waves beside them danced; but they Out-did the sparkling waves in glee ; A poet could not but be gay, In such a jocund company : I gazed and gazed—but little thought What wealth the show to me had brought : For oft when on my conch I lie In vacant or in pensive mood, They flash upon that inward eye Which makes the bliss of solitude; And then my heart with pleasure fills And dances with the daffodils.

Wordsworth.

146

KINDNESS TO ANIMALS.

KINDNESS TO ANIMALS.

I would not enter on my list of friends
(Though graced with polished manners and

fine sense,

Yet wanting sensibility, the man
Who needlessly sets foot upon a worm.
An unadvertent step may crush the snail
That crawls at evening in the public path ;
But he that has humanity, forewarned,
Will step aside, and let the reptile live.
The creeping vermin, loathsome to the sight,
And charged perhaps with venom, that in.

trudes
A visitor unwelcome, into scenes
Sacred lo neatness and repose, the alcove,
The chamber, or refectory, may die;
A necessary act incurs no blame.
Not so, where, held within their proper

bounds,
And guiltless of offence, they range the air
Or take their pastime in the spacious.field;
There they are privileged, and he that hurls
Or harms them there, is guilty of a wrong,
Disturbs the economy of Nature's realm,
Who, when she formed, desigued them an

abode.

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The sum is this : If mans convenience,

health, Or safety, interfere, his rights and claims Are paramount, and must extinguish theirs : Else are they all, the meanest things that are, As free to live, and to enjoy that lite, As God. was free to form them at the first, Who in his sovereign wisdom made them all.

Corper.

THE REFUGE, Who should it be ?—where would'st thou

look for kindness ? When we are sick where can we turn for

"succour; When we are weary, where can we complain; And when the world looks cold and surly on us, Where can we go to meet a warmer eye, With such sure confidence as to a Mother?

Joanna Ballie.

THE MUSIC OF HEAVEN. The holy prophets say that Heaven will be a

singing choir. I reverence the prophets,' their tongues are

lit with fire;

148

MUSIC OF HEAVEN.

I feel a song

And when they say that Heaven will be an halleluia wide. within

my

heart, and strike my lyre with pride; For oh, I ever pray the prayer, by blessed

Jesus given, “Thy will be done, our Father, on earth as

'tis' in heaven." This earth will be hosanna; this earth will

be a psalm, When all the discords of our hearts are har

monised in calm ; This earth will be a concert as of myriad

angel throats, When Love, the Great Musician, plays on

willing human notes ; Wheu Life is Music then the truth that

prophets forth have given, Will be; for earth will then become a har

mony, a heaven. Not that, O Lyre! thy tones can rise no

higher than the earth, But that the poet-child must sing first at its

place of birth, Then travel forth as troubadour, through

countries and through years,

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