A Collection of Miscellanies: Consisting of Poems, Essays, Discourses & Letters, Occasionally Written

Front Cover
Samuel Manship, 1710 - English literature - 322 pages

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 251 - O send her out of thy holy heavens, and from the throne of thy glory, that being present she may labour with me, that I may know what is pleasing unto thee.
Page 10 - Let there be light/ and straight sprang forth this wondrous day. Let now the eastern princes come, and bring Their tributary offering. There needs no star to guide their flight, They'll find thee now, great King, by thine own light. And thou, my soul, adore, love, and admire, And follow this bright guide of fire. Do thou thy hymns and praises bring, Whilst angels, with veil'd faces, anthems sing.
Page 22 - Shalt be — thou know'st not what — and live — thou know'st not how! Amazing state! no wonder that we dread To think of death, or view the dead; Thou'rt all wrapt up in clouds, as if to thee Our very knowledge had antipathy.
Page 89 - Where, at the grates and avenues of sense, My soul must watch to have intelligence; Where but faint gleams of Thee salute my sight, Like doubtful moonshine in a cloudy night? When shall I leave this magic sphere, And be all mind, all eye, all ear?
Page 10 - twas done, 'tis glorious and divine, Thou dost with radiant wonders shine. The sun with his bright company, Are all gross meteors, if compared to thee. Thou art the fountain whence their light does flow, But to thy will thine own dost owe. For (as at first) thou didst but say, " Let there be light," and straight sprang forth this wondrous day.
Page 276 - ... am firmly persuaded, that our love of God may be not only passionate, but exceeding the love of women. He endeavoured to prove this from the use of church music, and maintains, that though the beauty of God be not the same with that which we see in corporeal beings, and as it comes intellectually, cannot directly fall within the sphere of the imagination; yet it is something analogous to it, and that very analogy is enough to excite a passion...
Page 2 - Stagger, and Fall to the Ground ; For God was in the Sound. The Voice of God was once again, Walking in the Garden, heard : And once again, was by the Guilty Hearers fear'd : Trembling feiz'd every Joint, and Chilnefs every Vein.
Page 38 - ... enemy's blood. The day, the signal day is come When of my enemies I must vengeance take ; The day when Death shall have its doom, And the dark kingdom with its powers shall shake. Fate in her calendar...
Page 2 - This little Victory He won, Shew'd what He could have done. But He to whom as Chief was given, The whole Militia of Heaven, That Mighty He, Declines all Guards for His Defence, But that of His infeparable Innocence ; And quietly gives up His Liberty. He's feiz'd on by the Military Bands, With Cords they Bind His Sacred Hands: But ah ! how Weak, What Nothings would they prove, Were He not held by ftronger Ones of Love.
Page 105 - He considers, that that which we call Antiquity, is properly the nonage of the world ; that the sagest of his authorities were once new ; and that there is no other difference between an...

Bibliographic information