The Edinburgh Review: Or Critical Journal, Volume 88

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A. Constable, 1848

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Page 215 - Here lies poet Goldsmith, for shortness called Noll, Who wrote like an angel, but talked like poor poll.
Page 294 - Political economy, considered as a branch of the science of a statesman or legislator, proposes two distinct objects : first, to provide a plentiful revenue or subsistence for the people, or, more properly, to enable them to provide such a revenue or subsistence for themselves ; and secondly, to supply the state or commonwealth with a revenue sufficient for the public services. It proposes to enrich both the people and the sovereign.
Page 179 - Will you then give your faithful diligence always so to minister the doctrine and sacraments, and the discipline of Christ, as the Lord hath commanded, and as this Church and Realm hath received the same...
Page 356 - ... we have consecrated the state, that no man should approach to look into its defects or corruptions but with due caution; that he should never dream of beginning its reformation by its subversion; that he should approach to the faults of the state as to the wounds of a father, with pious awe and trembling solicitude.
Page 10 - Turner's Sacred History of the World, attempted to be Philosophically considered, in a Series of Letters to a Son.
Page 503 - Pray, madam, let this farce be played. The Archbishop will act it very well. You may bid him be as short as you will. It will do the Queen no hurt, no more than any good; and it will satisfy all the wise and good fools, who will call us all atheists if we don't pretend to be as great fools as they are.
Page 311 - ... it is the law of production from the land, that, in any given state of agricultural skill and knowledge...
Page 345 - James, whose skill in physic will be long remembered ; and with David Garrick, whom I hoped to have gratified with this character of our common friend. But what are the hopes of man ? I am disappointed by that stroke of death which has eclipsed the gaiety of nations, and impoverished the public stock of harmless pleasure.
Page 7 - VERY JOYOUS, PLEASANT, AND REFRESHING HISTORY of the Feats, Exploits, Triumphs, and Achievements of the Good Knight, without Fear and without Reproach, the gentle LORD DE BAYARD.
Page 339 - Seven years, my Lord,' have now passed, since I waited in your outward rooms, or was repulsed from your door; during which time I have been pushing on my work through difficulties of which it is useless to complain, and have brought it at last to the verge of publication, without one act of assistance, one word of encouragement, or one smile of favour.

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