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SECOND PART.

All maidens fair then have a care,

When you a milking go,
Trust not to young men's tempting tongues,

That will deceive you so;
Them you shall find to be unkind,

And glory in your woes;
For the shepherd's boy beguiled me,
Folding my daddy's ewes.

All maids, &c.

If you your virgin honors keep,

Esteeming of them dear,
You need not then to wail and weep,

Or your parents anger fear :
As I have said of them beware,

Would glory in your woes,
You then may sing with merry cheer,
Milking your daddy's ewes.

All maid's, &c.

A young man hearing her complaint,

Did pity this her case,
Saying to her, sweet beauteous saint,

I grieve so fair a face

Should sorrow so, then sweeting know

To ease thee of thy woes, I'll go with thee to the north country, To milk thy daddy's ewes.

All maids, &c.

Leander like I will remain,

Still constant to thee ever, As Pyramus or Troilus

Till death our lives shall sever;
Let me be hated evermore

Of all men that me know,
If false to thee, sweetheart, I be,
Milking thy daddy's ewes.

All maids, &c.

Then modestly she did reply,

Might I so happy be,
Of you to find a husband kind,

And for to marry me ;
Then to you I would, during life,

Continue constant still,
And be a true obedient wife,

Observiog of your will. . With O the broom, the bonny broom,

The broom of Cowden Knowes, Fain would I be in the north country,

Milking my daddy's ewes.

Thus with a gentle soft embrace,

He took her in his arms,
And with a kiss he smiling said,

I'll shield thee from all harms,
And instantly will marry thee,

To ease thee of thy woes,
And go with thee to the north country,

To milk thy daddy's ewes.
With O the broom, the bonny broom,

The broom of Cowden Knowes,
Fain would I be in my own country,

Milking my daddy's ewes.

XIX.

« THE FICKLE NORTHERN LASS,

OR,

The Wronged Shepherd's Resolution.”

From a black letter copy printed by F. Coles, Vere,

Wright, and Clarke.

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There was a lass in the north country,
And she had lovers two or three;
But she unkindly dealt by one
Who had to her great favour shown,

Which made him thus for to complain,
I ne'er will see my love again,

For since that she hath changed her mind,
I'll trust no more to women-kind.

I gave her ribbons for to wear,
And now and then a pair of gloves,
But she unkindly dealt by me,
And gave them to her other loves,
But now in the country will I hie,
And for to seek a new victory.

For since that she hath changed her mind,
I'll trust no more to women-kind.

Sometimes she vow'd she did me love,
And I was apt for to believe,
But all her flattering words did prove
No more than baits for to deceive,
As I do find it to my pain,
Therefore I'll ne'er believe again,

For since that she Hath changed her mind,
I'll trust no more to women-kind,

I must confess that in my eye,
She was a pearl I valued high,
But what is beauty without grace,
Or one where virtue hath no place,
Her false alluring smiles no more,
Shall draw my senses out of door,

For since that she hath changed her mind,
I'll trust no more to women-kind.

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I gave her heart, I gave her hand,
And all I had at her command,
She could not ask what she would have,
But presently the same I gave. .
Yet all my labours prov'd in vain,
For she would not requite my pain,

Then since that she hath changed her mind,
I'll trust no more to women-kind.

When I did think her most secure,
Another did her mind allure,
And by some crafty wiles she went,
To undermine my sweet content,
So that I now repent the day,
That ere I cast my love away.

For since that she hath changed her mind,
I'll trust no more to women-kind.

But now my resolution 's such,
To suffer for my loving much,
All women's company I'll shun,
For fear I further be undone,
And go where none hath power to know,
The subject of my grief and woe.

For since that she hạth changed her mind,
I'll trust no more to women-kind.

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