Page images
PDF
EPUB

X.

THE MAIDEN'S NAY, OR, I LOVE

NOT YOU.

I

SPIED a nymph trip over the plain, I lur'd to her, she turned again, I wood her as a young man should do, But her answer was, Sir, I love not you.

I thought she seem'd in every part,
So lovely fram'd by Nature's art,
Her beauty soon allured me to woo,
But her answer was, Sir, I love not you.

I told her all the sweet of love,
And whatever her mind might move,
To entertain a lover true,
But her answer was, Sir, I love not you.

I told her how I would her deck,
Her head with gold, with pearls her neck,
She gave a frown, and away she flew,
But her answer was, Sir, I love not you.

Not me (sweet heart) oh tell me why!
Thou should my proffer'd love deny,

To whom

my

heart I have vow'd so true, But her answer was, Sir, I love not you.

My sweet, and dearest love, quoth I,
Art thou resolv'd a maid to die,
Of such a mind I know but few,
But her answer was, Sir, I love not you.

This is the pleasant maying time,
This is the pleasant golden prime,
But
age

will come and make you to rue, That e're you said, Sir, I love not you.

O do not thou my suit disdain,
Nor make me spend my time in vain,
But kindly grant a lover's due,
Yet still she said, Sir, I love not you.

Fair nymph, quoth I, but grant me this,
To enrich my lips with one poor kiss,
I grant you that, which I grant but few,
Yet still she said, Sir, I love not you.

The young man proffering then to depart,
It griev'd this maiden then to the heart,
For having kist, О then did she rue,
That ere she said, Sir, I love not you.

Wherefore with speed she thought it best,
To stay him by her kind request;
Whose counsels thus hath caus’d her to rue,
That ere she said, Sir, I love not you.

But now at last she did begin
With gentle words to lure him in :
The second part shall plainly shew
She chang'd her note of, I love not you.

SECOND PART.

Kind Sir, quoth she, what needs this haste,
With that a smile on him she cast,
Shame curb’d her long, but affection drew
These words, I love no man but you.

I feel the force of Cupid's dart,
So deep hath pierc'd my tender heart :
Believe me then, for my words are true,
You will I love, Sir, and none but you.

Do not deny my proffer'd love,
Nor think that I the wanton prove:
Though women seldom use to woo,
Yet I will love, Sir, and none but you.

When women love, they will it hide,
Untill their lover they have tried,
Though I say nay, as maidens do,
You will I love, Sir, and none but you.

Here is, quoth she, my heart and hand,
My constant love thou shalt command :
And I do vow to be ever true,
You will I love, Sir, and none but you.

Whilst golden Titan does display,
His beams unto the chearful day,
Whilst spring the winter doth ensue,
You will I love, Sir, and none but you.

On thee my love is fixed fast,
On thee my love is firmly plac'd;
For thee I'll bid the world adieu,
You will I love, Sir, and none but you.

If Hero should Leander leave,
Fair Lucrece Collatine deceive,
Or Syrinx prove to Pan untrue,
Yet I'll love you, Sir, and none but you.

Object no former coy reply,
Suspect no future constancy;
Accept my love as a tribute due
Only to you, Sir, and to none but you.

VOL. I.

The young man noting well her words,
This courteous answer then affords;
Give me thy hand, take mine in lieu :
My love I grant here, and so do you.

To church with speed then let us hie
In marriage bands ourselves to tie,
Where interchanging hands and hearts
I'll love thee dearly till death us parts.

Mark well my song you

maiden's соу, ,
That count true love a foolish toy :
Do not disdain when young men woo,
But love them freely as they love you.

[Printed for F. Coles, T. Vere, and J. Wright.]

XI.

“A most excellent Song of the Love of young Palmus

and faire Sheldra, with their unfortunate love."

To the tune of Shackley-hay.

Young Palmus was a ferryman,

Whom Sheldra fair did love,
At Shackley, where her sheep did

graze,
She there his thoughts did prove ;

« PreviousContinue »