Page images
PDF
EPUB

Who caus'd this present wretched state,

And fill his heart with woe, And then he may repent too late

My dismal overthrow.

XLVII.

THE YOUNG SEAMAN'S MISFORTUNE,

OR,

The False-hearted Lass of Limehouse.

[From the Pepys Collection.]

To the tune of the Spinning-wheel. Licensed according

to order.

You loyal lovers far and near,

That live and reign in Cupid's court,
I'd have you freely lend an ear,
While I

my sorrows do report: She that I lov'd has left me o'er ; I'll never trust a woman more.

[ocr errors]

In her I plac'd my chief delight,

And was her captive night and day; For why ? her charming beauty bright

Had clearly stole my heart away : But she will not my joys restore ; I'll never trust a woman more.

On board of ship I chanc'd to go,

To serve our good and gracious king :
Now when she found it must be so,

She did her hands in sorrow wring,
Yet wedded when I left the shore ;
I'll never trust a woman more.

My dearest love, she often cry'd,

Forbear to sail the ocean sea ; If fortune shall us now divide,

Alas! what will become of me? This she repeated ten times o'er ! I'll never trust a woman more,

A thousand solemn vows I made,

And she return'd the like again,
That no one should our hearts invade,

But both in loyal love remain ;
Yet she another had in store !
I'll never trust a woman more,

I was obliged to leave the land,

And ready to go hoist up sail,
At which tears in her eyes did stand,

And bitterly she did bewail ;
Yet she another had in store !
I'll never trust a woman more,

I gave her then a ring of gold,

To keep in token of true love,
And said, My dearest dear behold!

I evermore will loyal prove.
She married when I left the shore !
I'll never trust a woman more.

Five months I ploughed the ocean main,

With courage void of dread and fear : At length with joy return'd again

To the embraces of my dear. But she another had in store! I'll never trust a woman more.

Constancy doth torture me,

And make my sorrows most severe; Like a keen dart it pierc'd my heart,

For why? I did the tydings hear, As soon as e'er I came on shore ! I'll never trust a woman more.

[ocr errors]

Now must I wander in despair,

I find it is the Fates' decree; My grief is more than I can bear,

I can love none alive but she : Farewell, farewell, my native shore ! I'll never trust a woman more.

XLVIII.

THE PLEASANT HISTORY OF DORASTUS

AND FAUNIA.

Into Bohemia dwelt a king,

Pandosto high, to name :
He had a queen, Bellaria call’d,

Fair, beauteous, and of fame.

He had a friend Egestus call's,

A king of great renown, And for love of Pandosto he

Did leave his land and crown.

And to Bohemia he did sail,

Pandosto for to see :
Who with Bellaria, his queen,

Receiv'd him royally.

Royall Bellaria lov'd her lord

Which her constrain’d and moy'd, To welcome his most noble friend,

Whom he most dearly lov’d.

This King and Queen familiar growes,

Pandosto he beholds Bellaria with Egestus walk,

(Array'd in robes of gold.)

Into the garden, hand in hand,

He sees them sporting go, Pandosto groweth jealous straight,

And turn'd Egestus foe.

One Franion, his cup bearer,

He doth unto him call :
And chargeth him with poyson strong

To make Egestus fall,

Franion refus'd, but yet the king

With threats did him ov’rset : And with fair words, when he had done,

Promised to make him great.

« PreviousContinue »