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I will bethink me what is best,

A way for to be taken,
Her love to gain, and her obtain,

I would not be forsaken ;
Nor would I have her say me nay,

Nor give me speeches bitter,
For I have lov'd her since yesterday,
And yet I cannot get her.

. But let her choose, &c,

I have her father's free consent,

That she with me should marry, Her mother likewise is content,

And grieves that she should carry So proud a mind, or be unkind

To me in speeches bitter; For I bear to her a loving mind,

And yet I cannot get her, But let her choose, &c.

With her I at a wedding was,

Where we did dance together, She is a curious handsome lass,

And yet like wind and weather Her mind doth change, she's kind, she's strange,

Mild, gentle, cruel, bitter, Yet howsoere I love her dear,

And yet I cannot get her. But let her choose, &c.

Yet will I hope upon the best,

All foolish fears excluding, And at her faithful service rest.

Thus here in brief concluding,
With some dear friend to her I'll send

A kind and loving letter,
And hope in time her love to gain,

And for my wife to get her.
And then I'll sing with merry cheer

This ditty and no other,
Whilst breath does last, and life be past,

I'll be a faithful lover,

FINIS.

By Robert Guy

XLI.

« THE MARRYED MAN'S LESSON:

OR,
A Disswasion from Jealousie.”
To the tune of All you that will woo a Wench.

You men who are married come hearken to me,

I'll teach you a lesson if wise you will be, Then take my advice that's intended for good,

And so 'tis if it be but well understood : 'Twill cause you to shun all contention and spleen,

That daily betwixt man and woman are seen, I speak against jealousy, that monster fierce,

And wish I could conquer the fiend with my verse, O be not thou jealous, I prithee, dear lad,

For jealousy makes many good women bad.

If thou have a good wife then I thee advise,

To cherish her well, for she is a rare prize, If she be indifferent between good and bad,

Good means to reform her may easily be had : If she be so evil that there are few

worse, Imagine thy sins have deserved that curse,

Then bear with true patience thy cross as 't is fit,

And thou to a blessing thereby may'st turn it, But be not thou jealous, I prithee, dear lad,

For jealousy makes many good women bad.

Between these three wives, the good, bad, and the mean,

I ground the whole argument of this my theme, For in them a man's human bliss or his woe

Doth chiefly consist as experience doth show, Thus is it not counsel that's worthy regard,

Which teaches to soften a thing that is hard, And what I intend is in every man's will

To turn to a virtue what seemeth most ill. Then be not thou jealous, I prithee, dear lad,

For jealousy makes many good women bad.

A wife that is good, being beautiful, may

Perhaps raise suspicion, that she'll go astray, O note the fond humours that most men possess,

They're neither content with the more nor the less, For if she be homely, then her will he slight,

Such man neither fair nor foul can delight, If once he be jealous the other he scorns,

There's no greater plague than imagin’d horns. Then be not thou jealous, I prithee, dear lad,

For jealousy makes many good women bad.

A wife that's indifferent between good and ill,

Is she that in houswifery shews her good will,

Yet sometimes her voice she too much elevates,

Is that the occasion for which he her hates?
A sovereign remedy for this disease

Is to hold thy tongue, let her say what she please :
Judge, is not this better than to fight and scratch,

For silence will soonest a shrew overmatch.
However I pray thee shun jealousy, lad, ,

For jealousy makes many good women bad.

A wife that's all bad, if thy luck be to have,

Seek not to reclaim her by making her slave,
If she be as bad as ever trod on ground,

Not fighting or jealousy will heal thy wound:
For mark when a river is stopt in its course,

It o'erflows the banks, then the danger is worse,
Thy own example and patience withall,

May her from her vices much rather recall.
Then be not thou jealous, I prithee, dear lad,

For jealousy makes many good women bad.

SECOND PART.

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A wife that is virtuous in every respect,

Who doth her vow'd duty at no time neglect,
She's not free from censure, for fools their bolts shoot

As oft at the head as they do at the foot :
A kiss or a smile, or a jest or a dance,

Familiar discourse, or an amorous glance,

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