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Their senses in liquour that's nappy they'll steep
Though they be afforded to have little sleep;
They still are employed for to dress us in brief
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minc'd pies, and roast-beef.

Although the cold weather doth hunger provoke,
'Tis a comfort to see how the chimneys do smoke,
Provision is making for beer, ale and wine;
For all that are willing or ready to dine,
Then haste to the kitchen, for diet the chief,
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minc'd pies, and roast-beef.

All travellers as they do pass on their way,
At gentlemen's halls are invited to stay
Themselves to refresh, and their horses to rest,
Since that he must be Old Christmas's guest,
Nay, the poor shall not want, but have for relief
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minc'd pies, and roast-beef.

Now Mock-beggar-hall it no more shall stand empty,
But all shall be furnisht with freedom and plenty,
The hoarding old misers who us'd to preserve
The gold in their coffers, and see the poor starve,
Must now spread their tables, and give them in brief
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minc'd pies, and roast-beef.

The court and the city, and country are glad,
Old Christmas is come to cheer

up

the sad,

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Broad pieces and guineas about now shall fly,
And hundreds be losers by cogging a die,
Whilst others are feasting with diet the chief,
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minc'd pies, and roast-beef,

Those that have no coin at the cards for to play,
May sit by the fire, and pass time away,
And drink off their moisture contented and free,
“ My honest good fellow, come, here is to thee,”
And when they are hungry, fall to their relief
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minc'd pies, and roast-beef.

Young gallants and ladies shall foot it along,
Each room in the house to the musick shall throng,
Whilst jolly carouses about they shall pass,
And each country swain trip about with his lass;
Meantime goes

the caterer to fetch in the chief Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minc'd pies, and roast-beef.

The cooks and the scullion, who toil in their frocks,
Their hopes do depend upon their Christmas box :
There is very few that do live on the earth,
But enjoy at this time either profit or mirth;

Yea those that are charged to find all relief, ; Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minc'd pies, and roast-beef.

Then well may we welcome Old Christmas to town,
Who brings us good cheer, and good liquor so brown,

To pass the cold winter away with delight,
We feast it all day, and we frolick all night,
Both hunger and cold we keep out with relief,
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minc'd pies, and roast-beef.

Then let all curmudgeons who dote on their wealth,
And value their treasure much more than their health,
Go hang themselves up, if they will be so kind,
Old Cliristmas with them but small welcome shall find,
They will not afford to themselves without grief,
Plum-pudding, goose, capon, minc'd pies, and roast-beef,

XXXVI.

“ THE MERRY HOASTESS :

OR,

A pretty new Ditty, compos’d by an Hoastess that

lives in the city To wrong such an Hoastess it were a great pitty, By reason she caused this pretty new Ditty.”

Come all that love good company,

And hearken to my ditty, "Tis of a lovely hostess fine,

That lives in London city;

Which sells good ale, nappy and stale,

And always thus sings she, My ale was tunn'd when I was young,

And a little above my knee.

Her ale is lively, strong and stout,

If you please but to taste;
It is well brew'd you need not fear,
But I
pray you

make no waste;
It is lovely brown, the best in town,

And always thus sings she, My ale was tunn'd when I was young,

And a little above my knee.

The gayest lady with her fan,

Doth love such nappy ale, Both city maids and country girls

That carry the milking pail : Will take a touch and not think much

To sing so merrily, My ale was tunn'd when I was young,

And a little above my knee.

Both lord and esquire hath a desire

Unto it night and day, For a quart or two be it old or new,

And for it then will pay :

With pipe in hand they may her command

To sing most merrily,
My ale was tunn'd when I was young,

And a little above my knee.

You'r welcome all brave gentlemen,

If you please to come in, To take a cup I do intend,

And a health for to begin :
To all the merry jovial blades,

That will sing for company,
My ale was tunn'd when I was young,
And a little above

my

knee.

every man fill

Here's a health to all brave Englishmen,

That love this cup of ale;
Let

up
his

can,
And see that none do fail :
'Tis very good to nourish the blood,

And make you sing with me,
My ale was tunn'd when I was young,

And a little above my knee.

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