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QUESTIONS, Shewing the use of Compound Addition and Subtractions

NEW-YORK, MARCH 22, 1814. 1.

Bought of George Grocer, 12 C. 2 qrs. of Sugar, at 52s. per cwt. £.32 10 28 lbs, of Rice, at 3d. per lb.

0 7 3 loaves of Sugar, wt. 35lb. at 1s. 1d. per lb. 1 17 11 3 C. 2 qrs. 14 lb. of Raisins, at 30s. per cwt. - 6 10 6

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What sum added to 171. 118. 8 d. will make 1001.

Ans. 82. 8s. 3d. 3qr. 3. Porrowed 501. 10s. paid again at one time 171. 11s. 6d. and at another time, 9!. 4s. Sd. at another time 171. 98. (vi!, and at another time 19s. 6 d. low much remains unpaid ?

Ans. £4 48. 90. 4. Borrowed 1001. and paid in part as follows, viz. at one time 217. 11s. d. at another time 19!. 178. 4.d. at another time 10 dollars at 6s. each, and at another time two English guineas at 288. each and two pistarcens, ät 14.d. each ; how much remains due, or unpaid? Ans. £52 12s. 81d.

5. A, B, and C, drew their prize money as follows, viz. A lad 751. 159. 4d. B. had three times as much as A, lacking 15s. 6d. and C, had just as much as A and B both; pray how much had C'?

Ans. £302 5s. 10d. 6. I lent Peter Trusty 1000 dols. and afterwards lent him 26 dols. 45 cts. more. He has paid me at one time 361 dols. 40 cts. and at another time 416 dels. 09 cents, be sides a note which he gave me upon James Paywell, for 145 dols. 90 cts. ; how stands the balance between us ?

Ans. The balance is $105 06 cts. due to me. 7. Paid A B in full for E F's bill on me, for 1051. 10s. viz. I gave him Richard Drawer's note for 151. 148. 9d. Peter Johnson's do. for 301. Os. 6d. an order on Robert Dealer for 391. 118. the rest I make up in cash. I want to know what sum will make up

the deficiency?

Ans. £20 35, 9d

8. A merchant had six debtors, who together, owed him 29171. 10s. 6d. A, B, C, D, and E, owed him 1675l. 138. 9d of it ; what yas F's debt ? Ans. £1241 168. 9d.

9. A merchant bought 170. 2qrs, 141b. of sugar, of which he sells 9C. 3qrs. 251b, how much of it remains unsold ?

Ans. 7C. 2qrs. 1715. 10. From a fashionable piece of cloth which contained 52yds. 2 na. a tailor was ordered to take three suits, each 6yds. 2qrs. how much remains of the piece?

Ans. 39yds. 2qrs. 2na. 11. The war between England and America commenced April 19, 1775, and a general peace took place January 20th, 1783 ; how long did the war continue ?

Ans. 7 yrs. Imo. 1d. COMPOUND MULTIPLICATION. S COMPOUND Multiplication is when the Multiplicand consists of several denominations, &c. 1. To Multiply Federal Money.

RULE. Multiply as in whole numbers, and place the separatrix as many figures from the right hand in the product, as it is in the multiplicand, or given sum.

EXAMPLES. $ cts.

$ d. c. m. 1. Multiply 35 09 by 23. 2. Multiply 49 0 0 5 by 97 25

97

17545 7018

343033 441045

$ 1753,4 8 5

Prol. $877, 25
3. Multiply i dol. 4 cis. by
4. Multiply 41 cts. 5 mills by
5. Multiply 9 dollars by
6. Multiply 9 cents by
7. Multiply 9 milis hy

S05 Ana. 317, 20 150

62, 23 30 Ans. 450, 00 50 Ans.

8. There were forty-one men concerned in the pay. ment of a sum of money, and each paid 3 dollars and 9 anills; how much was paid in all ?

Ans. $123 36cte. Imills. 3. The number of inhabitants in the United States u five millions ; now suppose each should pay the trifling sum of 5 cents a year, for the term of 12 years, towards a continental tax; how many dollars would be raised thcre. by?

Ans. three millions Dollars.

2. To Multiply the denominations of Sterling Money,

Weights, Measures, &c.

RULE.* - Write down the Multiplicand, and place the quantity underneath the least denomination, for the Multiplier, and in multiplying by it, observe the same rules for carry. ing from one denomination to another, as in compound Addition.

INTRODUCTORY EXAMPLES

d. q. Multiply 1 11 6 2 by 5 How much is 3 times 11 9

5

f. s.

8. d.

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* When accounts are kept in pounds, shillings and pence, this kind of multiplication is a concise and elegant method of buding the value of goods, at so mucb por yard, ib. &c, the general rule being to multiply the given pnce by the quantity:

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2 2

41 per lb.

per tun.

9 per

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per bush.

Practical Questions.
What cost nine yards of cloth at 5s. 6d. per yard ?

£0 5 6 price of one yard.
Multiply by 9 yards.

Ans. £2 9 6 price of nine yards.
QUESTIONS.

ANSWERS. £. 4. d.

f. s. d. 4 gallons of wine, at 0 8 7 per gallon. 1 14 4 3 C. Malaga Raisins, at 1 2 3 per cwt. 5 11 3 7 reams of paper, at 0 17 9} per ream.

6 4 61 8 yds. of broadcloth, at 17 91 per yard. 11 2 4 9 lb. of cinnamon, at 0 11

5 11 tuns of hay, at 2 1 10

23 02 12 bushels of apples, at 0 1

bush. 1 1 0 12 bushels of wheat, at 0 9 10

5 18 0 2. When the multiplier, that is, the quantity, is a composite number, and greater than 12, take any two such numbers as when multiplied together, will exactly produce the given quantity, and multiply first by one of those figures, and that product by the other; and the last product will be the answer.

EXAMPLES.
What cost 28 yards of clotlı, at 6s. 10d. per yard ?

£. s. d.

0 6 10 price of one yard.
Multiply by 7
Produces

2 7 10 price of 7 vards.
Multiply by 4
Answer, £9 11 4 price of 28 yards.

E*

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