International Law

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Contents

Nonintervention
87
Practice in Regard to Intervention
88
EQUALITY
96
Equality of States Extends only to Legal Status 45 Inequalities among States
97
CHAPTER XI
102
The Navigation of Rivers 53 Jurisdiction of Enclosed Waters 54 The Threemile Limit 55 Jurisdiction over Fisheries 56 Jurisdiction over Vessels
103
Aerial Jurisdiction 58 Jurisdiction over Persons and the Question of Na tionality 59 Jurisdiction over Naturalborn Subjects 60 Jurisdiction over Foreig...
104
Jurisdiction over Aliens 63 General Exemptions from Local Jurisdiction 64 Exemption of Sovereigns from Local Jurisdiction 65 Exemptions of State...
105
Special Exemptions 67 Extradition 68 Servitudes
106
PROPERTY
156
CHAPTER XIII
157
Functions of a Diplomatic Representative
176
Termination of Mission
178
Immunities and Privileges
180
Diplomatic Practice of the United States 82 Consuls
187
CHAPTER XIV
201
The Interpretation of Treaties 89 The Termination of Treaties
202
CHAPTER XV
220
REDRESS
221
Methods of Nonhostile Redress
225
Retorsion
226
Reprisals 94 Embargo
227
Pacific Blockade
228
INTERNATIONAL LAW OF
231
CHAPTER XVI
232
WAR
233
Declaration and Notification of
235
Object of
236
General Effects of
238
CHAPTER XVII
240
STATUS OF PERSONS IN WAR
241
CHAPTER XVIII
246
STATUS OP PROPERTY ON LAND
247
Real Property of Enemy Subjects
248
Personal Property of Enemy Subjects
249
CHAPTER STATUS OF PROPERTY AT SEA
252
Vessels
253
Goods
255
Submarine and Wireless Telegraph
256
CHAPTER XX
260
CONDUCT OF HOSTILITIES 261
261
Forbidden Methods in the Conduct of Hostilities
263
Privateers
265
Voluntary and Auxiliary Navy
266

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Page 491 - Her Majesty's Government, in order to evince its desire of strengthening the friendly relations between the two countries and of making satisfactory provision for the future, agrees that in deciding the questions between the two countries arising out of those claims, the Arbitrators should assume that Her Majesty's Government had undertaken to act upon the principles set forth in these rules.
Page 316 - ... to prevent the departure from its jurisdiction of any vessel intended to cruise or carry on war as above, such vessel having been specially adapted, in whole or in part, within such jurisdiction, to warlike use.
Page 128 - The Suez Maritime Canal shall always be free and open, in time of war as in time of peace, to every vessel of commerce or of war, without distinction of flag.
Page 490 - In deciding the matters submitted to the Arbitrators they shall be governed by the following three rules, which are agreed upon by the High Contracting Parties as rules to be taken as applicable to the case...
Page 490 - First to use due diligence to prevent the fitting out, arming, or equipping, within its jurisdiction, of any vessel which it has reasonable ground to believe is intended to cruise or to carry on war against a Power with which it is at peace...
Page 310 - No ship of war or privateer of either belligerent shall hereafter be permitted, while in any port, roadstead or waters subject to the territorial jurisdiction of her majesty, to take in any supplies, except provisions and such other things as may be requisite for the subsistence of her crew, and except so much coal only as may be sufficient to carry such vessel to the nearest port of her own country, or to some nearer destination...
Page 309 - States from which a vessel of the other belligerent (whether the same shall be a ship of war, a privateer, or a merchant ship) shall have previously departed until after the expiration of at least twenty-four hours from the departure of such last-mentioned vessel beyond the jurisdiction of the United States.
Page 75 - ... we, therefore, have thought fit, by and with the advice of our Privy Council, to issue this our royal proclamation: And we do hereby strictly charge and command all our loving subjects to govern themselves accordingly, and to observe a strict neutrality...
Page 322 - Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under the enemy's flag. 4. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective, that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
Page 216 - The present treaty shall be duly ratified by the President of the United States of America, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate thereof, and by her Britannic Majesty; and the ratifications shall be exchanged either at Washington or at London within six months from the date hereof, or earlier if possible.

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