The Canadian Naturalist and Geologist, Volume 6

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Dawson., 1861 - Geology
 

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Page 394 - Just previous to this time, in the Report of the Regents of the University of New York, for 1859, Professor Hall had described and figured by the name of Olenus two species of trilobites from the slates of Georgia, Vermont, which Emmons had wrongly referred to the genus Paradoxides. They were at once recognized by Barrande, who called attention to their primordial character, and thus...
Page 97 - ... like those of the Appalachian range. In truth, Mr. Hall observes, the carboniferous limestone is one of the most extensive marine formations of the continent, and is characterized over a much greater area by its marine fauna than by its terrestrial vegetation. " The accumulations of the coal period were the last that gave form and contour to the eastern side of our continent, from the Gulf of St. Lawrence to the Gulf of Mexico ; and as we have shown that the great sedimentary deposits of successive...
Page 199 - ... to furnish important collateral evidence in support of the reasoning founded on other sciences, such as philology and ethnology, which has long demanded, for the development of our race, a number of years far exceeding that which is allowed by the chronology previously received. It is the beautiful expression of Sir Thomas Browne, which I find quoted by Dr Mantell in a former paper on this subject, that " Time conferreth a dignity upon the most trifling thing that resisteth his power...
Page 242 - ... animals ; the latter is not surprising when we consider that a considerable portion of the tissues of the lower marine animals is destitute of nitrogen, and very similar in chemical composition to the woody fibre of plants.
Page 92 - Hall, shown to be the natural base of the Silurian rocks in America, as Barrande and De Verneuil have proved it to be on the continent...
Page 334 - as many as two hundred of these concretions, varying in size from that of a small pea to that of a hazel-nut, to be passed after the administration of a single dose of Podophyllin and the Oil.
Page 95 - Quebec group is of considerable economic interest inasmuch as it is the great metalliferous formation of North America. To it belongs the gold which is found along the Appalachian chain from Canada to Georgia, together with lead, zinc, copper,, silver, cobalt, nickel, chrome and titanium. I have long since called attention to the constant association of the latter metals, particularly chrome and nickel, with the ophiolites and magnesian rocks of this series, while they are wanting in similar rocks...
Page 408 - zone primordiale" of Bohemia — having no representative in the north-western Highlands, there is necessarily a complete unconformity between the fossil-bearing crystalline limestone and quartz-rocks with the Maclurea, Murchisonia, Orphile'ta, Orthis, Orthoceratites, etc., and those Cambrian rocks on which they rest. A great revolution in the ideas of many an old geologist, including myself, has thus been effected. Strengthened and confirmed as my view has been by the concordant testimony of Ramsay,...
Page 104 - bottom strata to establish lines of weakness or of least resistance in the earth's crust, and thus determine the contraction which results from the cooling of the globe to exhibit itself in those regions, and along those lines where the ocean's bed is subsiding beneath the accumulated sediments...
Page 329 - Ocean, and divided into two slopes by a watershed that nearly follows the political boundaryline, and throws the drainage to the Gulf of Mexico and the Arctic Ocean. The northern part of this plateau has a slope, from the Rocky Mountains to the eastern or Laurentian axis, of six feet in the mile, but is broken by steppes, which exhibit lines of ancient denudation at three different levels ; the lowest is of freshwater origin ; the next belongs to the Driftdeposits, and the highest is the great Prairie-level...

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