Shakespeare's Sonnets Re-done

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Author House, Jan 14, 2005 - Poetry - 160 pages

SHAKESPEARE’S SONNETS RE-DONE consists of all 154 of the sonnets William Shakespeare sent down to us; however, those items have been given some evident rewritings -- between ‘translations’ and ‘adaptations’.  Stylistic compromises infest the now perhaps final versions.  For instance, some definite splittings of infinitives and some very findable examples of the expletive ‘there’ and the expletive ‘it’--along with such probably major solecisms as Enjambment--might be seen as real detractors.  After an Editorial While had elapsed a giving up occurred. [Bruce Hamilton had intended to reduce to zero the occurrences of the word “wow,” but he somehow retained all such occurrences.] SHAKESPEARE’S SONNETS RE-DONE reflects an abiding wish to produce highly accessible Modern Versions of Shakespeare’s ‘originals.’

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Page 57 - I have no precious time at all to spend, Nor services to do, till you require. Nor dare I chide the world-without-end hour Whilst I, my sovereign, watch the clock for you, Nor think the bitterness of absence sour When you have bid your servant once adieu ; Nor dare I question with my jealous thought Where you may be, or your affairs suppose, But, like a sad slave, stay and think of...
Page 65 - Since brass, nor stone, nor earth, nor boundless sea, But sad mortality o'er-sways their power, How with this rage shall beauty hold a plea, Whose action is no stronger than a flower? O, how shall summer's honey breath hold out Against the wreckful siege of battering days, When rocks impregnable are not so stout, Nor gates of steel so strong, but Time decays?
Page 60 - Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, So do our minutes hasten to their end; Each changing place with that which goes before, In sequent toil all forwards do contend.
Page 57 - Whilst I, my sovereign, watch the clock for you, Nor think the bitterness of absence sour When you have bid your servant once adieu ; Nor dare I question with my jealous thought Where you may be, or your affairs suppose, But, like a sad slave, stay and think of nought Save, where you are how happy you make those. So true a fool is love that in your will, Though you do any thing, he thinks no ill.
Page 30 - When to the sessions of sweet silent thought I summon up remembrance of things past, I sigh the lack of many a thing I sought, And with old woes new wail my dear time's waste...
Page 19 - And do whate'er thou wilt, swift-footed Time, To the wide world and all her fading sweets ; But I forbid thee one most heinous crime : O...
Page 150 - ... best? Who taught you how to make me love you more, the more I hear and see just cause of hate?
Page 32 - And though they be outstripp'd by every pen Reserve them for my love, not for their rhyme Exceeded by the height of happier men. O, then vouchsafe me but this loving thought : " Had my friend's Muse grown with his growing age, A dearer birth than this his love had brought, II To march in ranks of better equipage : But since he died, and Poets better prove, Theirs for their style I'll read, his for his love.
Page 71 - ... to the Youth, but they lack something of those others' silvery sadness : — LXXI. ' No longer mourn for me when I am dead, Than you shall hear the surly sullen bell, Give warning to the world that I am fled From this vile world, with vilest worms to dwell : Nay, if you read this line, remember not The hand that wrote it ; for I love you so, That I in your sweet thoughts would be forgot, If thinking of me then should make you woe. O, if, I say, you look upon this verse When I perhaps compounded...

About the author (2005)

Bruce Hamilton attended Yale College for some two years and then, in 1968, dropped out of Yale. He assiduously has devoted his literary practicing mostly to 5-finger-exercise pieces, such as sonnets and limericks. His recent "literary hero" was and still is Jorge Luis Borges, with whom he shares certain pessimisms regarding language and literature.

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