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BY REV. GUSTAVUS HINES,
LATE MISSIONARY OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH, TO OREGON,

BUFFALO:
GEORGE H. DERBY AND CO.

1850.

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THE NEW YORK
PUBLIC LIBRARY

708200

ASTOR, LENOX AND TILDEN FOUNDATIONS 1915

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Entered according to Act of Congress, in the year 1850, by

GUSTAVUS HINES,
In the Clerk's Office for the Northern District of New York.

JEWETT, THOMAS & Co., STEREOTYPERS AND PRINTERS,

BUFFALO, N. Y.

PREFACE.

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IF this volume does not commend itself to the favorable considerations of the reading public, it will not be owing to any deficiency of material in the possession of the author, to enable him to furnish a most interesting and instructive work. Though his opportunities for the acquirement of that kind of knowledge resulting from observation, and necessary to qualify one to instruct and entertain mankind, during seven years of constant journeyings in various parts of the world, both by sea and land, have been perhaps greater than usually falls to the lot of oven authors of books of travel, yet, conscious of his want of the requisite qualifications to array his work in that fascinating drapery necessary to charm the reader at once into an unqualified approval, the author casts himself upon the public with all due deference.

The principal apology necessary to offer for the publication of this work, is a desire to connect with entertainment tho promotion of a more extensive and particular knowledge of those interesting portions of the world where it has been the privilege of the author to travel, and make his observations.

While the world is literally teeming with fictitious publications, here is presented a volume of facts, for the most of which the author is alone responsible ; and in the absence of the tinsel adorning of a glowing and high-sounding style, the truthfulness of what is narrated is the principal merit to which the work is entitled.

The “ History of the Oregon Mission,” to which the first chapter of the work is devoted, has been drawn from the most reliable sources, and, principally from the short notes of the late Rev. Jason Lee, and the Journal of the late Cyrus Shepherd, the first missionary teacher in Oregon.

This part, the author flatters himself, will supply the Christian public with a needful desideratum, with respect to the true character of that important Mission, and of the courageous and self-denying men who were the first to carry the Gospel across the Rocky Mountains, and to proclaim it along the shores of the Pacific Ocean.

The Journal, commencing with the departure of the Missionaries in the Ship Lausanne in the fall of 1839, will introduce the reader to all

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that is interesting relating to the largest expedition of the kind that ever sailed from an American port. It will acquaint him with "Life on the Ocean Wave," and the different interesting phonomena of the great deep. It will introduce to him the people of other countries, and give him information with respect to many of their customs. It will present him with a glimpse of oriental scenery, and occasionally unfold the beauties and sublimities of the mountain landscape. It will conduct him through perils by sea and perils by land, and perils among the most savage, degraded and treacherous of the human race.

The Atlantic, the Pacific, and the Indian Oceans ; Brazil, Chili, the Sandwich Islands, Oregon, China, the Spanish Islands, and even Africa herself, have all been laid under contribution to enrich the Journal; and from these different fields of observation have been collected facts, circumstances, and incidents of history, which cannot fail to enlist the attention and excite the interest of the reader, and to induce him to pursue the narrative, until, with the author, he shall have circumnavigated the globe.

The last few Chapters of the book are devoted exclusively to the Geography and History of the Oregon Territory. From a residence of several years in Oregon, connected with the fact that he made it a leading object to become informed from personal observation, not only with the geography of the country, with its productions; the soil, climate, seasons, mountains, valloys, prairies, forests, rivers, &c.; but also with every circumstance of importance which has ever transpired in connection with either the civil, political or religious interests of the country, the author believes himself to be qualified to present the inquiring public with more correct information regarding that portion of the world, than has hitherto been furnished from any source. For some of the facts connected with the History of Oregon, the author would acknowledge his indebtedness to the able and interesting Memoirs of Mr. Greenhow, the recent translator and librarian of the department of State, at Washington.

With these remarks, conscious of the uprightness of his intentions, the author would now place his offering upon the public altar ; counting no other favor in its behalf than that to which the merit of his performance is justly entitled.

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