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put the adjacent property owners to considerable expense. In order to keep the expense as low as possible it is proposed to use 10-inch pipe laid on a minimum grade of 25 per cent and to provide a flush tank at the end of each line. This minimum grade of .25 per cent is a little lower than is desirable, but with the ample Aushing facilities provided there seems to be no reason why the sewers can not be kept in satisfactory condition. On the plans a manhole instead of a flush tank is indicated at the west end of Sunset avenue. This is probably a mistake and should be corrected.

With one exception there is no change of grade nor alignment between manholes. On Protection avenue between Moore and Eureka avenues there is apparently a bend of several degrees about 100 feet above the manhole at Eureka avenue. In view of the fact that this bend will make it impossible to look through or rod the sewer it would seem advisable to provide a manhole at the bend particularly as the distance between the manholes as shown, is approximately 700 feet. In general the distance between the manholes is about 500 feet. In one caşe, however, on Central avenue the distance is 695 feet and an additional manhole should be provided, located in the center of the block as is done on the lines of the adjacent streets which are of the same length. On Weber street, Goodel avenue and the north end of Gray street the upper extremities of the sewers are apparently left with dead ends. This is not in accordance with good practice and lampholes or manholes should be provided at these points.

At the junction of John and King streets there is apparently some mistake in the elevation of the sewer invert which should be corrected.

Although as mentioned above, the village of Herkimer was notified on July 25, 1913, to construct works for the preliminary treatment of the entire sanitary sewage of the village and to have such works completed and in operation by August 1, 1914, no plant has been constructed and no steps have been taken toward the installation of such a plant. The construction of the proposed sewer extensions will tend to increase the pollution of the Mohawk river and as is pointed out in the previous reports on the examination of the plans for sewage of villages along this river, no additional sewage should be discharged into it without treatment and steps should be taken as rapidly as possible to remove the pollution that now enters the river. It seems desirable, therefore, that the village of Herkimer should be required to proceed with the construction of the disposal works at an early date.

I would, therefore, recommend that the plans for the extensions of the sewerage system of the village of Herkimer submitted September 17, 1917, be approved and a permit be issued for the discharge of sewage from the proposed extensions into the Mohawk river with the following conditions:

1. That a flush tank be provided at the west end of Sunset avenue.

2. That an extra manhole be provided at Central avenue, located near the middle of the block,

3. That manholes or lampholes be provided at the upper ends of the sewers at Weber street, Goodel avenue and at the north end of Gray street.

4. That a manhole be provided at the bend on Protection avenue between Moore and Eureka avenues.

5. That the elevation of the invert at the corner of John and King streets be corrected.

6. That when required by the State Commissioner of Health a sewage disposal works be constructed and put in operation. I further recommend that, owing to present conditions, the time for constructing the preliminary sewage treatment works be extended from August 1, 1914, to such time as you may deem it advisable to designate.

Respectfully submitted,
THEODORE HORTON,

Chief Engincer ALBANY, N, Y., October 26, 1917

PERMIT Application having been duly made to the State Commissioner of Health, as provided by section 77 of chapter 49 of the Laws of 1909, the “Public Health Law" as amended by chapter 553 of the Laws of 1911, constituting chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws, permission is hereby given to the Municipal Commission of the village of Herkimer to discharge sewage from the proposed sewers in Main, East German and other streets into the waters of the Mohawk river through the existing outlet sewer below the South Washington Street bridge within the municipality of Herkimer in accordance with the plans accompanying the petition, under the following conditions:

1. That this permit shall be revocable at any time or subject to modification or change when in the judgment of the State Commissioner of Health such revocation, modification or change shall become necessary.

2. That the issuance of this permit shall not be deemed to affect in any way action by this Department on any future application that may be made for permission to discharge additional sewage or effluent into the waters of this State.

3. That only sanitary or domestic sewage and no storm water or surface water from streets, roofs or other areas shall be admitted to the proposed sewers.

4. That a flush tank be provided at the west end of Sunset avenue.

5. That an extra manhole be provided at Central avenue, near the middle of the block.

6. That manholes or lampholes be provided at the upper ends of sewers in Weber street, Goodel avenue and at the north end of Gray street.

7. That a manhole be provided at the bend on Protection avenue, between Moore and Eureka avenues.

8. That after November 1, 1920, sewage from the proposed sewers shall not be discharged without treatment into the Mohawk river, but shall be conveyed to and treated in the sewage disposal works for the village of Herkimer to be constructed in accordance with the notice issued by this Department to the Municipal Commission of the village of Herkimer on October 31, 1917.

M. NICOLL, JR.,

Deputy State Commissioner of Health October 31, 1917

In the Matter of the Application of the Village of Herkimer for the Extension

of the Time for Constructing Sewage Disposal Works to Treat the Sewage of the Village as Required by the State Department of Health.

In response to the application of the Municipal Commission of the village of Herkimer transmitted by E. W. Sluyter, clerk of the Municipal Commission under date of October 12, 1917, asking for an extension of the time for the construction of the sewage disposal works to treat the sewage of the village shown by the plans approved by this Department on July 25, 1913, which sewage disposal works were required to be completed and put in operation by August 1, 1914, under the terms of the notice issued to the Municipal Commission of the village of Herkimer by this Department on July 25, 1913, in accordance with section 77 of chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws (Public Health Law); and after careful consideration of the facts and reasons presented in said application the time within which such disposal works shall be constructed and put in operation is hereby extended from August 1, 1914, to November 1, 1920.

This extension of time is granted in accordance with and under the provisions of section 77 of chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws (Public Health Law) on this 31st day of October, 1917.

M. NICOLL, JR., Albany, N. Y.

Deputy State Commissioner of Health

HUNTER (Mansfield Ferry)

HERMANN M. BIGGS, M.D., State Commissioner of Health:

I beg to submit the following report on our examination of plans for sewage disposal for the property of Mr. Mansfield Ferry at Onteora Park, Tannersville, N. Y., submitted to this Department for approval on September 17 and September 24, 1917.

According to the reports of the designing engineers, Mr. Ferry's property is situated in Onteora Park, about two miles north of Tannersville, Greene county, N. Y. There are two separate disposal plants on the property: one plant treats the sewage from the main residence. This plant was constructed and has been in continuous operation since 1909. The other disposal plant treats the sewage from the lodge and garage and was constructed and has breen in continuous use since 1915.

Main residence

The main residence contains 20 living and sleeping rooms in addition to 5 bath rooms, a laundry having 3 tubs, and 2 kitchen sinks. The average population is placed at 8 persons with a maximum of 15 persons. The average daily flow of sewage is estimated at 800 gallons and the maximum daily flow of sewage 1,500 gallons.

Sewage disposal The sewage from the main residence is treated in a sewage disposal plant consisting of a settling tank, dosing tank, and a subsurface irrigation system divided into two sections.

Settling tank The sewage from the residence is conveyed to the settling tank through a 5-inch vitrified pipe laid on a slope of about 4 per cent. This tank, which is rectangular in plan, is 8 feet long, 4 feet wide and has a depth of 5 feet below the flow line, giving a capacity of about 1,200 gallons, equal to about 142 days' flow of sewage on the basis of design used. The minimum detention period of the sewage would be about 19 hours. The tank has a reinforced concrete cover with a manhole opening. A baffle is also placed in the settling tank, 2 feet from the overflow into the dosing chamber.

Dosing tank

The sewage from the settling tank flows over a concrete partition into a dosing tank having a capacity of 56 cubic feet. This tank is connected with a 3-inch Wagner siphon by means of which the sewage is discharged intermittently through a 5-inch pipe laid on a slope of about 1.5 per cent to the diverting gate of the subsurface disposal field. The dosing tank is under the same cover as the settling tank and also has a manhole opening.

Subsurface disposal field The subsurface disposal field is located about 150 feet from the settling tank and dosing chamber. The distributing system consists of lines of 5-inch horseshoe tile laid on 3 by 6 inch hollow terra cotta base blocks with open joints on a slope of 0.20 per cent. The tiling is laid at a depth of about 18 inches below the ground surface and is surrounded by clean gravel. The disposal field is divided into two units each containing 962 lineal feet of tiling equal to from 125 to 210 feet of tile per person served.

Lodge and garage The lodge is the gardeners' dwelling and the second floor of the garage is the dwelling for the chauffeur and his family. Each building is equipped with a bath tub, wash basin, water closet fixtures, and kitchen sink. The garage proper also has a. sink, but the floor washings in the garage can in no way reach the disposal plant. It is stated that the occupants of the lodge and garage number about 6 persons. The maximum daily flow is estimated by the designing engineers at 400 gallons allowing 50 gallons per person per day and 100 gallons daily from the garage sink.

Sewage disposal The sewage from the lodge and garage is treated in a sewage disposal plant consisting of a settling tank, dosing tank, and intermittent sand filters. The effluent from the sand filters is discharged into 2 large absorption pits filled

with loose stones.

Settling tank The sewage from the lodge and garage is conveyed to the settling tank through 4 inch vitrified pipe laid on a slope of about 2 per cent. This tank which is rectangular in plan is 5 feet long, 4 feet, 3 inches wide and has a depth of 5 feet below the flow line giving a capacity of about 800 gallons equal to about two days' flow of sewage on the basis of design used. On the usual basis of 100 gallons per capita per day the sewage would have a detention period of about 11/3 days in the tank. The tank has a 5-inch reinforced concrete cover with a manhole opening. It has a baffle 15 inches from the inlet and a baffle 6 inches from the outlet into the dosing tank.

Dosing tank The sewage from the settling tank flows over a concrete partition into a dosing tank having a capacity of about 40 cubic feet. This tank is connected with 2 standard 5-inch Miller siphons which are so arranged as to discharge alternately. The dosing tank is under the same cover as the settling tank and is provided with a manhole opening.

Sand filters

Each siphon in the dosing tank is independently connected to a sand filter by a 4-inch cast iron soil pipe with lead joints laid on a slope of 4.0 per cent. Each sand filter is 8.5 feet square giving a total area of 144 square feet and a net area of about 132 square feet. The filters are covered with a mosquito proof copper screen during the summer and in the winter by a wooden covering. There is a space of 18 inches between the wooden covering and the surface of the sand filters. It is stated by the designing engineers that the filtering material consists of 3 feet of coarse sand underlaid by graded gravel. The filter effluent is collected by 2 rows of split pipe underdrain in each unit of the sand filters.

As noted above the combined area of the sand filters as designed is 132 square feet equal to about 0.003 acres. Based on a daily flow of sewage of 400 gallons the filters are required to operate at a rate of 133,000 gallons per acre per day. Based, however, upon a per capita rate of water consumption of 100 gallons per day which is the usual basis of design used the filters are required to operate at a rate of 200,000 gallons per acre per day. This rate of operation is excessive for intermittent sand filters which should not be required to operate over 100,000 gallons per acre per day based on a per capita rate of sewage contribution of 100 gallons per day. This would therefore require doubling the area of each unit of the sand filter. The dosing tank as stated above has a capacity of 40 cubic feet, sufficient to cover one unit of the sand filter, when the area is doubled, to a depth of about 4 inches with sewage.

Effluent disposal The filter effluent is collected by 2 rows of split pipe underdrain in each unit of the sand filter and is conducted to a separate absorption pit for each filter unit. Each pit is 7 feet in diameter and 7 feet deep, filled with field stone topped with soil. It is stated by the designing engin that there is no suitable field for subsurface irrigation nor any adjacent watercourse into which the effluent might be discharged, hence the necessity for the absorption pits.

Sludge disposal It is stated that the sludge from the settling tanks caring for the sewage from the main residence and also the lodge and garage is regularly removed once each year and is buried.

Conclusions and recommendations

From our careful examination of the plans it is found that, although the sewage disposal plants have been designed in general to meet the local requirements for sewage disposal, there is one modification as noted above which should be made in the construction of the plant in order not only to increase its efficiency but also to reduce the work and cost of maintenance.

I therefore recommend that the plans be approved on the condition that the area of the sand filter be increased fifty per cent.

Respectfully submitted,
THEODORE HORTON,

Chief Engineer ALBANY, N. Y., September 28, 1917

PERMIT Application having been duly made to the State Commissioner of Health, as provided by section 76 of chapter 49 of the Laws of 1909, the Public Health Law," as amended by chapter 553 of the Laws of 1911, constituting chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws, permission is hereby given to Mr. Mansfield Ferry to discharge effluent from the proposed sewage disposal works for his property near Tannersville into the waters of the State tributary to Schoharie creek and its tributaries within the town of Hunter in accordance with the plans accompanying the petition, under the following conditions:

1. That this permit shall be revocable at any time or subject to modification or change when in the judgment of the State Commissioner of Health such revocation, modification or change shall become necessary.

2. That the issuance of this permit shall not be deemed to affect in any way action by this Department on any future application that may be made for permission to discharge additional sewage or effluent into the waters of this State,

3. That the proposed sewage disposal works shall be constructed in complete conformity with the plans or approved amendments thereof except as provided in condition 5 of this permit.

4. That only sanitary or domestic sewage and no surface or storm water from grounds, roofs or other areas shall be discharged into the proposed sewage disposal plant.

5. That the area of the sand filter shall be increased 50 per cent over that shown by the approved plans.

M. NICOLL, JR.,

Deputy State Commissioner of Health November 27, 1917

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