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Oswego and St. Lawrence. The certified capacity of the hospital is 1,846 patients. At the time of the inspection the population was 2,237 patients and 366 employees, a total of 2,603.

An examination of the sanitary condition of the hospital was made on May 3 and 4, 1917. As a result of this investigation certain insanitary conditions were found to exist and the report covering in detail the results of the inspection contained the following conclusians and recommendations:

Conclusions and recommendations 1. That in view of the insanitary condition of the plumbing as pointed out in detail in the body of this report

(a) Where the waste or soil pipes or the plumbing fixtures are not back vented suitable ventilation be provided for them.

(b) All of the obsolete types of fixtures, such as the long hopper, wash down, flush closets be replaced by modern sanitary fixtures.

(c) More plumbing fixtures be provided where needed in accordance with the standard given in the body of this report. 2. That softened water be provided for the laundry.

3. That since it is apparent that the institution is overcrowded to such an extent that it cannot satisfactorily care for the present number of patients, more room be provided either by additions to the present buildings or by erecting new ones.

4. That in view of the insanitary condition caused in the cow bam by leakage through the floor of the horse stable above, suitable place be provided elsewhere for the horses, and that no stock be kept in the stables over the cow barns.

(Utica) Utica State Hospital The Utica State Hospital is located in the western portion of the city of Utica, about 1 inile from the N. Y. C. R. R. station. Approximately 114 miles southeast of the hospital proper is located a farm called Grayeroft, and about 6 miles northwest near Marcy is a tract of 1,000 acres of land owned for use of the hospital. The total area of the land used in connection with the hospital is 1,402 acres. At the institution proper there are 18 buildings occupied as wards, employees quarters, industrial building, assembly hall and kitchen, and in addition to these there are 23 accessory buildings. At Graycroft farm there are 1 main building and 15 farm buildings. At the other farms there are 3 buildings occupied by inmates and employees and several buildings used for farm purposes.

The hospital receives as patients insane persons, except criminal insane, from the counties of Fulton, Hamilton, Ñerkimer, Montgomery, Oneida. Onondaga, Saratoga, Schenectady and Warren. The certified capacity of the hopital is 1,382. At the time of the inspection the total population was 1,910, made up of 1,585 patients and 325 employees.

An examination of the sanitary condition of the hospital was made on January 16 and 17, 1917. As a result of this investigation certain insanitary conditions were found to exist and the report covering in detail the results of the inspection contained the following conclusions and recommendations.

Conclusions and recommendations 1. That the institution authorities immediately proceed with the arrangements necessary to obtain a new and adequate supply of water of good sanitary quality at the main buildings of the institution either hy the development of a new source by the institution or by making arrangements for the use of water from the city system.

2. That, pending a new supply, every precaution be taken to prevent accidental or wilful pollution of the well by adequately fencing off the property upon which the well is located and by prohibiting trespassing and strictly enforcing such a prohibition.

3. That the hospital authorities keep a close watch upon the sanitary conditions around the shacks in the neighborhood of the well in order that a proper sanitary disposal of excretal matters shall be carried out.

4. That the well furnishing the water at the Woodside Farm be abandoned and another supply satisfactory in quality and quantity be provided.

5. That the springs which are subject to contamination at the Overlea Farm be abandoned and another supply not subject to contamination be

6. That the hospital authorities consider the installation as soon as practicable of a sewage disposal plant for the treatment of the sewage from the institution proper, plans for which should be submitted to this Department for approval, as required by the Public Health ·Law.

7. That suitable sewage disposal works be provided at the various farms conducted by the institution, plans for which should be submitted to this Department for approval.

8. That better ventilation be provided in the amusement hall.

9. That more room be provided for ward space either by providing new buildings or additions to the present ones, unless the number of patients at the institution can be reduced to eliminate the overcrowding.

10. That the heating systems and hot water systems be placed in good repair and so maintained.

11. That wherever the electric wiring is defective and constitutes a danger from fire it be replaced by proper wiring.

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PRISONS AND HOSPITALS FOR INSANE CRIMINALS

(Auburn) Auburn State Prison The Auburn State Prison is located on the north bank of Owasco river approximately in the center of the city of Auburn, Cayuga county, N. Y. The prison affords accommodations for 1,287 male and 150 female convicts. At the time of the inspection the total population was 1,626, made up as follows: Inmates, 1,357 men; 103 women; 166 employees. The area of the grounds is 13.5 acres. There are 18 occupied buildings all enclosed by a stone wall.

An examination of the sanitary condition of the prison was made on January 22 and 23, 1917. As a result of this investigation certain insanitary conditions were found to exist and the report covering in detail the results of the inspection contained the following conclusions and recommendations.

Conclusions and recommendations 1. That owing to the unsatisfactory state of repair of many of the buildings, especially in regard to the condition of floors and ceilings, these buildings be repaired and renovated and placed in a sanitary condition.

2. That in view of the insanitary condition of the plumbing and inadequacy of fixtures in many cases:

(a) The plumbing system be generally repaired and renewed where necessary in order to eliminate old unsatisfactory joints in the pipes and provide proper venting, renew old fixtures, etc., and place the system in a satisfactory sanitary condition throughout.

(b) Where insufficient plumbing fixtures are provided a sufficient number of sanitary fixtures be provided.

(c) That the toilets and toilet fixtures be kept clean and sanitary at all times. 3. That in regard to sewage disposal.

(a) The sewer system in the women's division be connected witi the general sewer as indicated by the plans previously approved by this Department.

(b) That the sewage screenings both from the bucket house and sewage screening chamber be stored in covered barrels, be removed daily and be either burned or buried at some point where insanitary

conditions will not be created. 4. That in view of the inadequate and unsatisfactory means of ventilation found as pointed out above in detail, proper methods and more adequate ventilation be provided in all cases.

5. That in view of the dangerous sanitary quality of the water supply derived from the Owasco outlet, this water be used only, if at all, for boilers and for flushing purposes or in such places as the water would in no way be exposed or accessible to the employees and inmates.

6. That as the use of the Owasco outlet supply constitutes a constant menace to the health of the employees and inmates, serious consideration be given to the absolute abandonment of the outlet supply.

7. That where the 6-inch main of the city supply crosses the 8-inch main, a cross connection be installed thus providing better circulation through the distribution system.

(Auburn) Auburn State Prison Farm The Auburn State Prison Farm which is leased by the Prison Department to be used in connection with the Auburn State Prison, is located adjacent to the northerly boundary line of the ciy of Auburn in the town of Throop, Cayuga county, N. Y. The buildings consist of a farm house occupied by

the keeper and his family, a barn and stable and a bunk house for the accommodation of the convicts quartered at the farm.

The last named building was not complete at the time of the inspection.

On April 25, 1917, the Superintendent of Prisons requested that an examination be made of the water supply at the farm. In response to this request an inspection of the sanitary condition of the farm was made by a representative of this Department on June 9, 1917.. As a result of this investigation it was found that certain insanitary conditions existed and the report giving the results of the examination contained the following conclusions and recommendations :

Conclusions and recommendations

1. That all use of the spring in the field near the stream be ahandoned and that the other sources of water supply be properly protected against pollution or that a new water supply to furnish an adequate supply of water of safe sanitary quality be installed for the farm.

2. That proper toilet facilities be provided for both the convicts and other persons at the farm.

3. That the cows be excluded from the stream into which the effluent from the disposal plant of the city of Auburn discharges.

4. That proper facilities, including a milk house, be provided to produce a milk of safe sanitary quality.

5. That proper fire protection be provided for the farm buildings. 6. That the buildings be repaired where necessary.

(Beacon) Matteawan State Hospital The Matteawan State Hospital is located on a hill about 1 mile north of the city of Beacon, Dutchess county, N. Y., and 134 miles east of the east bank of the Hudson river. About 484 acres of land are owned for the use of the hospital. The buildings are divided into 2 main groups known as the men's group and the women's group. The men's or main group consists of 12 buildings connected by corridors used for the accommodation of inmates and employees and the laundry and power house. The women's group located to the east of the main group is not yet completed and at present consists of 2 wards connected by a corridor.

The institution receives insane persons committed by order of courts of criminal jurisdiction and persons convicted of petty crimes, not felons, becoming insane while undergoing sentence, also patients in other State hospitals still exhibiting criminal tendencies. At the time of the inspection the total population was 1,117, made up of 904 inmates and 213 officers and employees.

An examination of the sanitary condition of the hospital was made on September 11, 1917. As a result of this investigation certain insanitary conditions were found to exist and the report covering in detail the results of the inspection contained the following conclusions and recommendations:

Conclusions and recommendations

1. That the overcrowded condition of the institution be relieved at once by

(a) The completion of the women's group of buildings.

(b) The construction of additional wards which should have not less than 600 cubic feet of air space and 50 square feet of floor space

for each patient. 2. That a new laundry provided with proper ventilation facilities be constructed.

3. That the new kitchen planned in connection with the women's group be constructed.

4. That the old iron hopper closets and the iron lavatories be replaced by modern porcelain fixtures.

5. That all the toilet rooms be provided with floors of nonabsorbent material.

6. That ward 8-A be replaced by a permanent building.

7. That the kitchen, dining rooms and hospital wards be screened during the summer.

8. That the outfall sever be extended to discharge beyond the fill made by the brick yard south of it.

9. That an additional pump located in a separate or in a fire-proof building be installed and properly connected for use in case of fire.

10. That the storm and sanitary sewage be separated and that the sanitary sewage be given preliminary treatment before being discharged into the river.

(Comstock) Great Meadow Prison Great Meadow Prison is located in the town of Fort Amn, Washington county, N. Y., near the unincorporated village of Comstock. The area of the grounds is 998 acres. There are fourteen occupied buildings, 5 included in the main group comprising the cell block, cage, dormitory and domestic buildings, bath house and power house; and 9 used as residences for officers and guards.

The prison receives male felons transferred from other prisons. At the time of the inspection the population consisted of 756 inmates, 56 officers and attendants, a total of 812. The capacity of the institution is 1,168 inmates,

An examination of the sanitary condition of the institution was made on January 10 and 11, 1917. As a result of this investigation certain insanitary conditions were found to exist and the report covering in detail the results of the inspection contained the following conclusions and recommendations:

Conclusions and recommendations 1. That the work of removing the vegetation and muck from the bottom and shores of Dolph pond and other measures for developing and protecting the supply be completed as rapidly as possible.

2. That the water supply derived from Dolph pond be temporarily chlorinated while work is being carried on at the pond or upon its watershed which may seriously pollute the supply.

3. That every precaution be taken against any possibility of contamination of the water supply derived from the driven well, and that when the necessary repairs and improvements are made to utilize more fully the Dolph pond supply, the use of the driven well be discontinued.

4. That sanitary privies constructed with removable containers and properly protected against flies be constructed as rapidly as possible and be used where necessary on the institution grounds.

5. That the sewage disposal plant be repaired and put in service in accordance with the following recommendations, nearly all of which are included in previous reports.

(a) That a water pipe be constructed to the disposal plant and provision be made for flushing out the sludge.

(b) That the siphon chamber and siphons therein be placed in proper operating condition and that if it is not possible for the attendant to do this that a mechanic from the manufacturers be sent for and the plant be put in good working order throughout.

(c) That the area of the sand beds be increased to double the original size, that intermediate underdrains, which, together with existing underdrains should be properly covered with fine gravel, be placed between the existing underdrains and also that the sewage be applied to the beds intermittently by the siphons.

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