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2. That the necessary repairs be made to the disposal plant to place it in good operating condition and that it be operated efficiently at all times.

3. That the halls be lighted at night by some system which will not constitute a menace from fire, that adequate fire fighting apparatus and a sufficient number of hydrants be provided, and a proper fire organization be established among the employees.

4. That the water pressure at the institution be increased sufficiently to be adequate for fire protection.

5. That means for properly pasteurizing the milk supply be provided as soon as possible.

(Rome) Rome State Custodial Asylum The Rome State Custodial Asylum is located about 2 miles southwest of the city of Rome, Oneida county, N. Y. The area of the grounds owned for the use of the institution is about 600 acres. There are 13 occupied buildings. The main buildings form a connected group extending east and west about 1,400 feet with two wings extending north and south about 200 feet. In addition to these there is the power house, and the usual farm buildings. Two farm colonies located at some distance from main buildings are conducted in connection with the institution.

The inmates of the institution consist of indigent, feeble-minded persons of both sexes, except able bodied children between the age of 7 to 14 who are able to use language and except feeble-minded women of the child bearing age, the latter two classes being cared for at other institutions of the State. At the time of the inspection the total population of the institution was 1,797, made up of 1,567 inmates and 230 employees.

The sanitary condition of the institution was examined on January 17 and 18, 1917. As a result of this investigation certain insanitary conditions were found to exist, and the report on the inspection contained the following conclusions and recommendations:

Conclusions and recommendations

1. That an adequate water supply be furnished at the institution by the construction or use of additional or larger mains from the city of Rome to the institution.

2. That because of the possibility of the water supply obtained from the infiltration gallery of Brush farm, which is at times undoubtedly polluted, being used for drinking water, this supply be abandoned.

3. That, as, there is danger of the serious pollution of the well used at the Stook farm, this well be abandoned as soon as possible, and that the water be boiled before being used for drinking purposes until the well is abandoned.

4. That in view of the overcrowded condition of the institution, more room be provided either by new buildings or additions to the present ones, if the present number or a greater number of patients is to be cared for.

5. That in view of the inadequacy of the plumbing facilities in some respects, more adequate facilities be provided where needed.

6. That adequate living quarters be provided for the employees.

7. That the old wooden stairs in building D be replaced by new ones which are fire-proof.

8. That the floors in the building of the farm colonies which are in need of repairs be repaired.

9. That in regard to the sewage disposal plant, recommendations made in the previous report on the special investigation be carried out.

(Syracuse) Syracuse State Institution for Feeble-Minded

Children

The Syracuse State Institution for Feeble Winded Children is located in the western part of the city of Syracuse, Onondaga county, Y. Y. A farm conducted in connection with the institution is located about 14 mile north of Fairmont station on the Auburn branch of the N. Y. C. & H. R. R. R., and about 412 miles northwest of the institution proper. The area of the grounds around the main buildings is 65 acres, and the area of the farm at Fairmont 210 acres. The main group of buildings consists of the administration building, laundry and power house, garden cottage, barn and other minor structures. They are all situated on high ground at an elevation of about 480 feet above mean sea level.

The object of this institution is to furnish the means of education to that portion of the youth of the State not provided for in any of its other educational institutions, and only children between the ages of 7 and 14 who are feeble-minded, or so deficient in intelligence as to be incapable of being educated at any ordinary school and who are not epileptic, paralyzed, helpless, insane or greatly deformed. At the time of the inspection the enrollment was 598 inmates. In addition to this there were 125 attendants, making a total of 723. The capacity of the institution is 600 inmates.

The sanitary condition of the institution was examined on January 17-20, 1917. As the result of this investigation certain insanitary conditions were found to exist and the report on the inspection contained the following conclusions and recommendations:

Conclusions and recommendations 1. That the work of repairing the ceilings and plaster in the buildings be completed as soon as possible.

2. That the reservoir of the main building at Fairmont farm be properly protected against pollution.

3. That the toilets on the grounds at the main institution be either properly prepared for winter use or be more securely protected against forcible entrance.

4. That, as soon as possible, the privies at Fairmont farm be abolished and a proper system of sewage collection and disposal for the entire farm buildings be built. In this connection I would also recommend that, until proper sewerage and sewage disposal works are built at the farm, the privies be properly constructed with removable containers, seat covers and doors and be made inaccessible to flies.

5. That dormitories for which toilets and baths are not provided be provided with such facilities.

6. That adequate fire protection be provided at Fairmont farm.

7. That all plumbing fixtures not properly provided with vents be properly vented.

8. That the necessary repairs be made and drains installed to prevent seepage of water into the basements of the buildings.

9. That the work of extending, repairing and remodelling the steam heating system of the institution be completed as soon as possible.

10. That the use of school rooms in which the lighting is inadequate be discontinued and others having sufficient light be provided, or that necessary improvements be made to furnish satisfactory light for those being used.

11. That careful studies of the comparative cost of placing the existing buildings in a satisfactory condition and of erecting structures of better design be made in order to determine the most economical course to be pursued, and that action along the most economical course be taken at once.

(Thiells) Letchworth Village Letchworth village is located near Thiells station, on the Erie railroad, in Rockland county, N. Y., and is about 3 miles from Haverstraw, on the West Shore railroad. A large portion of the land is located in the mountains bordering the Minisceongo creek, while the institution proper is located in the creek valley. The present buildings for inmates consist of two groups of colonies known as the Secor and Dosbrow colonies. The number of occupied buildings is 10, and in addition to these there are the usual farm buildings and sheds. The area of the property owned for use in connection with the institution is 2,100 acres.

The object of the institution is to care for epileptic and feeble-minded persons. At the time of the inspection the total population was 401, as follows: Inmates, 255 boys; 75 girls; attendants and employees, 60. The capacity of the institution was at the time of the inspection 340.

An examination of the sanitary condition of the institution was made on March 27–28, 1917. As a result of this investigation certain insanitary conditions were found to exist, and the report on the inspection included the following conclusions and recommendations:

made up

Conclusions and recommendations 1. In regard to water supply.

(a) That in view of the possibility of camps being constructed on the watershed of the main supply, or of other sources of pollution being established the institution authorities continue to make inspections of the watersheds at sufficiently frequent intervals to protect them from this form of pollution.

(b) That the use of wells be discontinued wherever possible, but where it is necessary to use a well it be adequately protected against pollution.

(c) That consideration be given to treating the water for the removal of carbon dioxide. 2. That the sewage disposal plant be placed in efficient operating condition and be given the regular and careful attention necessary to assure its satisfactory operation at all times. 3. That in order to adequately protect the milk supply:

(a) The construction and proper equipment of the milk house be completed as soon as possible.

(b) The wooden plugs now used as covers for the milk cans be abolished and more suitable covers be provided. 4. That a more adequate fire fighting organization properly supplied with the necessary apparatus be provided at the institution.

(West Haverstraw) State Hospital for Crippled and Deformed

Children The State Hospital for Crippled and Deformed Children is located at West Haverstraw, Rockland county, N. Y. The institution is about 1 mile from the Hudson river and 11% miles northwest of the West Haverstraw station of the West Shore railroad. There are eight buildings consisting of the administration building, solarium, isolation building and other buildings of less importance. The buildings are all located on elevated ground where the drainage in general is satisfactory.

The object of the institution is to furnish proper care and treatment for dependent children who are residents of New York State and who are crippled and deformed or are suffering from disease from which they are likely to become crippled or deformed. At the time of the inspection there were 113 patients at the hospital. The certified capacity of the hospital is 70.

As the result of the inspection made of the institution on March 27, 1917, a report stating in detail the conditions, contained the following conclusions and recommendations:

Conclusions and recommendations 1. That new buildings or additions to the present ones be constructed to eliminate the overcrowding of the wards, officers' and employees' quarters, storage, kitchen and laundry and the buildings be repaired and painted where necessary.

2. That the institution be maintained in a clean condition at all times and no soiled bed or other linen be used.

3. That as recommended in the 1910 and subsequent reports unless the present water supply is made uniformly safe in quality either by protection of its sources from contamination or by proper treatment, the institution authorities proceed at once to develop a new supply according to the plans approved by this Department.

4. That a sewage disposal plant for at least partial treatment of the sewage, plans for which should be submitted to this Department for approval, be constructed.

5. That owing to the uncertain quality of some of the milk furnished the institution and the difficulity of controlling the conditions under which it is produced.

(a) The milk now being used which is not previously pasteurized be pasteurized at the institution and that the institutional authorities request the Agricultural Department to regularly inspect all of the dairies and herd:s furnishing milk to the institution.

(b) That if possible additional pasture land be purchased and the institution provide its own herd of cows which should be tested hy the Department of Agriculture to insure that it is free from tuberculosis and further that such herd be frequently tested thereafter

to insure thae maintaining of a tubercular free herd. 6. That all of the buildings of the institution be provided with an ade

quate and properly constructed heating system and that the use of coal

stoves and other heating appliances of a similar nature he discontinued. 7. That more adequate fire protection for the institution be provided.

VOL. II --21

STATE HOSPITALS FOR THE INSANE

(Brooklyn) Brooklyn State Hospital The Brooklyn State Hospital is located in the Flatbush District, Borough of Brooklyn, city of New York. A farm conducted in connection with the hospital is located at Creedmore on Long Island, about 12 miles from the institution proper. The area of the grounds around the main buildings is 35 acres and the area of the farm at Creedmore is 193 acres. The buildings consist of the main group which is really composed of seven separate buildings connected by corridors; the industrial building, kitchen, laundry, amusement hall and other necessary accessory buildings. In addition to these two buildings were under construction at the time of the inspection. There are sixteen or seventeen buildings on the farm, only two of which were occupied at the time of the inspection.

The hospital admits as patients insane persons, except criminal insane, from the county of Kings which comprises the Brooklyn State Hospital district. The certified capacity of the hospital is: men, 342; women, 295; total, 637. At the time of the inspection the total population of the institution was 889 inmates and 123 attendants, making a total of 1012.

An examination of the sanitary condition of the institution was made on March 9 and 10, 1917. The report giving in detail the results of this inspection contained the following conclusions and recommendations:

Conclusions and recommendations 1. That in view of the dilapidated condition of the old buildings they be thoroughly overhauled and repaired and rendered sanitary or, preferably, that additional new buildings modern in type and of sufficient capacity to accomodate all the inmates of the institution be constructed and the old buildings removed.

2. That in view of the insanitary condition of the plumbing in the old buildings it should be thoroughly overhauled in connection with the repairs of the buildings or that, if the old buildings are to be abandoned and new ones constructed, the necessary repairs be made to keep the plumbing in a sanitary condition until the new buildings are ready for occupancy.

3. That the necessary repairs be made or equipment provided for adequately heating all parts of the institution.

4. That the general overcrowding of the institution be eliminated as soon as the buildings now under construction are ready for occupancy, and that in the meantime the present overcrowding be obviated as far as possible by careful sanitary regulations.

(Buffalo) Buffalo State Hospital The Buffalo State Hospital is situated in the northern portion of the city of Buffalo, Niagara county, N. Y., about 1 mile from the Niagara river. The area of the grounds is about 1,704 acres. There are twenty-four occupied buildings. The main group consists of the administration building, on either side of which is a wing consisting of five separate buildings connected by corridors. The Elmwood group is similarly arranged but there are only two buildings on each side of the main building. In addition to these there are four other buildings used as wards, six for industrial purposes, eight for employees quarters, one for a poor house and a number of accessory buildings and sheds.

The hospital receives as patients insane persons, except criminal insane, from the counties of Erie and Niagara. The certified capacity of the institution is 1,704. At the time of the inspection the total number of inmates was 2,178.

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