Page images
PDF
EPUB

It is proposed to treat the sewage from this toilet room in a septic tank to be located adjacent to the toilet room and to discharge the effluent through a short length of 6-inch pipe into an open ditch which discharges into the river below the outlet of the hotel sewer some 1,200 feet from the settling tank. The proposed settling tank which is to be divided into two compartments is to be 5 feet wide, 10 feet long and 71/2 feet deep inside dimensions with a depth below the flow line of about 534 feet. It will have a capacity of approximately 2,100 gallons and, therefore will give about one day's detention of the sewage on the basis of design used.

The settling tank is so designed that the two compartments would operate in series. This arrangement does not appear to be satisfactory inasmuch as it will not permit of throwing one compartment out of use for cleaning without disturbing the flow through the other compartment. In order to facilitate cleaning of the tank each compartment should be provided with an independent inlet and outlet provided with valves so arranged that either or both compartments may be operated at one time.

I am of the opinion that very objectionable conditions would be created in the open ditch by the discharge of effluent from the settling tank into it. A closed pipe leading from the settling tank to the river should be provided. The company should also take steps to provide for at least a partial treatment by sedimentation of the sewage now discharged into the river from the hotel and from the employees' houses.

From our careful examination of the plans I am of the opinion that the proposed settling tank, if modified in accordance with the suggestions embodied in this report, should provide for the satisfactory treatment of the sewage from the toilet room at the mines.

I would, therefore, recommend that the plans be approved and a permit issued allowing the discharge of effluent from the proposed settling tank into the Little River on the following conditions:

1. That the effluent pipe from the settling tank he extended to the river.

2. That whenever required provisions be made for more complete treatment of the sewage in the toilet rooms.

3. That whenever required plans for the treatment of the sewage now discharged into the river from the hotel and from the buildings occupied by employees be submitted for approval.

Respectfully submitted,

THEODORE HORTON, ALBANY, N. Y., March 12, 1917

Chief Engineer

PERMIT

Application having been duly made to the State Commissioner of Health, as provided by section 76 of chapter 49 of the Laws of 1909, the “Public Health Law as amended by chapter 553 of the Laws of 1911, constituting chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws, permission is hereby given to the Benson Mines Company to discharge effluent from the propused works to treat the sewage from the proposed new toilet room into the waters of Little river near the highway bridge within the town of Clifton in accordance with the plans accompanying the petition, under the following conditions:

1. That this permit shall be revocable at any time or subject to modification or change when in the judgment of the State Commissioner of Health such revocation, modification or change shall become necessary.

2. That the issuance of this permit shall not be deemed to affect in any way action by this Department on any future application that may be made for permission to discharge additional sewage or effluent into the waters of this State.

3. That both the sewer and the sewage disposal works shown by plans approved this day shall be fully constructed in complete conformity with such plans or approved amendments thereof except as provided in condition 4 of this permit.

4. That the effluent pipe from the settling tank shall be extended to and into the river in such a manner as to be submerged at low water stage.

5. That whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health additional works for more complete treatment of the sewage from the toilet room shall be installed and put in operation in accordance with plans satisfactory to this Department.

6. That whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health satisfactory detailed plans for works to treat the sewage discharged from the hotel and from other properties owned by the Company shall be submitted for approval; and after approval of such plans any or all portions of such works shall be constructed and put in operation at such time or times thereafter as said Commissioner may designate.

LINSLY R. WILLIAMS,

Acting State Commissioner of Health March 14, 1917

COLONIE (School District No. 2) Plans for the disposal of the sewage from the school house, District No. 2, in the town of Colonie, Albany county, N. Y., by means of a settling tank and a subsurface irrigation field were approved by this Department on August 22, 1917.

CORNWALL (Firth Carpet Co.) HERMANN M. BIGGS, M.D., State Commissioner of Health:

I beg to submit the following report on our examination of plans for the disposal of sewage and wastes from the factory of the Firth Carpet Company near Firthcliffe in the town of Cornwall, Orange county, submitted to this Department for approval on March 30, 1917.

These plans were first submitted for approval on February 22, 1917, and after a preliminary examination of them which showed that they were not in satisfactory condition for approval and did not contain sufficient data to permit of finally passing upon them they were returned to a representative of the company who called at the Department on May 21, 1917.

The factory of the Firth Carpet Company is located near Moodna creek at Firthcliffe about 21,2 miles from the confluence of the creek with the Hudson river above Cornwall. The creek at this point has a drainage area of approximately 135 square miles. We have no record of any water supply being taken from this stream below the carpet works and it appears to flow for the most part through a sparsely developed section.

According to the data submitted with the plans the factory which employs some 540 men has an annual output of 3,500,000 yards of carpet. The sewage and wastes from the factory consist of sanitary sewage from the water closets and toilet room in the factory, some 5,000 gallons per day of wool scouring and wool yarn washings and some 110,000 gallons of wash water which it is understood contains starch, dyes, oil and other wastes.

It is planned at present to provide for the disposal of the sanitary sewage in a sewage disposal plant located near Moodna creek below the plant, and for the treatment of the wastes from the wool scouring and yarn washing processes in a grease recovery plant to be located at the factory. No provisions are made at this time for the disposal of the other wastes referred to and permission is asked by the company for an extension of time for the submission of plans for the disposal of these wastes inasmuch as it appears that the proposed method of treating these wastes has not been fully worked up by

the company.

The disposal of sanitary sewage The sanitary sewage from the toilet rooms of the plant is to be collected in a system of 6- and 8-inch sewers, at the upper ends of which are to be installed flush tanks. The sewage to be collected by these sewers is to be conveyed by gravity flow through some 1,200 feet of 8-inch sewer having a slope of .64 per cent to a disposal plant consisting of a screen chamber, a settling tank of the Imhoff type and a sludge drying bed for the disposal of sludge. This plant is to be located on the easterly side of Moodna creek and the plans indicate that an area has been reserved near the plant on which supplementary or more complete treatment works may be constructed in the future. It is planned to discharge the effluent from the settling tank at the edge of the stream about 12 foot above high water. This outlet sewer should, however, be extended well into the stream so that the outlet will be submerged at low water stage.

Screen chamber

This chamber is to be a small concrete structure 4 feet wide, 5 feet long and about 312 feet deep inside dimensions. It is to be located near the inlet end of the settling tank and is to be provided with an inclined bar screen composed of 14-inch by 2-inch wrought iron bars spaced 114 inches center to center.

Imhoff tank

The proposed tank is of the horizontal flow type and is to be divided by means of reinforced concrete partitions, into an upper settling compartment and a lower sludge compartment. The settling compartment has a capacity of some 6,900 gallons and will, therefore, give an average time of detention of the sewage of about 6 hours assuming a per capita rate of sewage contribution of 50 gallons per day. The sludge compartment has a capacity of about 950 cubic feet. The sludge is to be removed by gravity flow through an 8-inch cast-iron sludge pipe and discharged into an adjacent sludge bed.

Sludge bed This bed has an area of 400 square feet and is to be filled to a depth of 12 inches with graded gravel ranging from 1/16-inch to 212 inches in size and a top layer of mortar sand 1/4-inch deep. The hed is to he underdrained by means of 3-inch vitrified tile pipe laid with open joints which are to discharge into a main drain 8 inches in diameter which in turn discharges into the outlet sewer from the settling tank.

Grease recovery plant This plant is to consist of 4 so-called cracking and neutralizing tanks and 2 metal boiling tanks for the recovery of grease. The 4 large tanks are each to be 10 feet in diameter and 6 feet deep, giving a capacity of about 3,000 gallons for each. Each tank is to be provided with a mechanical stirring device. The pipe connected with the tanks are to be so arranged that the wastes may be discharged into either of the 4 tanks.

Although it seems that the piping system had not been fully worked out it appears from the specifications submitted with the plans that wastes are first to be discharged into the wooden tanks and there heated and made acid with oil of vitriol which it is claimed will separate the grease from the wastes and leave a fairly clear, yellowish liquid having a volume of about 34 of the original liquor. This clear liquor is to be discharged onto the sludge drying hed divided into 2 compartments having an area of 200 square feet each. The filtering material as in the case of the sludge drying bed of the sewage disposal plant is to consist of 12 inches of graded gravel ranging in size from 1/16 inch to 27/2 inches and a top layer of mortar sand 1/2 inch deep.

The sludge in the wooden tanks resulting from the treatment of the wastes with the oil of vitriol is then to be discharged into the metal tanks where it is to be treated with caustic lime and boiled until most of the grease separates and can be skimmed off. The sludge remaining in these tanks will then be discharged on the sludge bed.

It appears that the proposed method of recovering the grease is to be similar to other grease recovery plants that have been installed at other places in connection with wool scouring operations and found to operate satisfactorily. It is important, however, that this plant shall at all times be under skilled and intelligent supervision and that it shall be operated with care and efficiency. It is possible also that it may be found necessary to neutralize the acidity in the effluent from the sludge bed by the application of alkaline before the discharge of the effluent into the stream.

Incinerator

Plans for an incinerator were also submitted in connection with the disposal of wastes and sewage. According to the plans and specifications the incinerator is to be installed for the purpose of consuming certain solid waste of the plant. The approval of these plans for the incinerator have not, however, been considered inasmuch as there will be no liquid wastes resulting from its operation.

Conclusions and recommendations

From our careful examination of the plans, I am of the opinion that the proposed sewage disposal plant and the grease recovery plant if properly constructed and if maintained with care and efficiency should produce effluents that may be discharged into Moodna creek without objection at this time. Plans for the treatment of the wastes not provided for by the present plans should be submitted by the company at an early date. It is possible that it may be found necessary in the future to provide for an additional treatment of the sanitary sewage and of the effluent from the sludge bed to be installed in connection with the grease recovery plant.

I would therefore recommend that the plans be approved on the following .conditions:

1. That whenever required, plans for a supplementary or more complete treatment of the sanitary sewage of the Firth Carpet Company shall be submitted to this Department for approval.

2. That whenever required, plans for additional treatment of the effluent from the grease recovery plant shall be submitted for approval.

3. That on or before August 1, 1917, plans for the treatment of the wastes not to be cared for by the present plant shall be submitted to this Department for approval.

Respectfully submitted,
THEODORE HORTON,

Chief Engineer. ALBANY, N. Y., April 12, 1917

PERMIT

Application having been duly made to the State Commissioner of Health, as provided by section 76 of chapter 49 of the Laws of 1909, the “ Public Health Law as amended by chapter 553 of the Laws of 1911, constituting chapter 45 of the Consolidated Laws, permission is hereby given to the Firth Carpet Company to discharge effluent from the proposed works to treat the factory or industrial wastes from the plant of said Company near Firthcliffe, into the waters of Moodna creek at the point of discharge shown by the plans within the town of Cornwall in accordance with the plans accompanying the petition, under the following conditions:

1. That this permit shall be revocable at any time or subject to modification or change when in the judgment of the State Commissioner of Health such revocation, modification or change shall become necessary.

2. That the issuance of this permit shall not be deemed to affect in any way action by this Department on any future application that may be made for permission to discharge additional sewage or effluent into the waters of this State.

3. That the waste disposal works shown by plans approved this day shall be fully constructed in complete conformity with such plans or approved amendments thereof.

4. That only industrial or factory wastes and no storm or surface water from grounds. roofs or other areas shall be discharged into the works for treatment of industrial wastes.

5. That no sludge or scum from any part of these works shall be discharged into Moodna creek or any other watercourse.

6. That whenever required by the State Commissioner of Health satisfactory detailed plans for supplementary or additional works for more complete treatment of the industrial or factory wastes from the plant shall be submitted for approval; and after approval of said plans such works shall be constructed and put in operation at such time as said Commissioner may designate.

7. That on or before August 1, 1917, plans for the treatment of the wastes from the plant which are not to be treated in the works now proposed shall be submitted to this Department for approval.

M. NICOLL, JR.,

Deputy State Commissioner of Health April 17, 1917

CROTON-ON-HUDSON

LINSLY R. WILLIAMS, M.D., Acting State Commissioner of Health:

I beg to submit the following report on our examination of plans for sewerage and sewage disposal for the village of Croton-on-Hudson, Westchester county, submitted to this Department for approval by the Board of Trustees on February 27, 1917.

These plans were previously submitted for approval on February 21, but they were not presented in duplicate nor accompanied by an engineering report and were returned to the designing engineers on February 21. According to the report and data submitted with the plans, it appears that the village is provided with a public water supply system installed in 1910. Since the installation of the water supply cesspools have been constructed in the various parts of the village many of which either overflow onto the surface of the ground or drain into small streams giving rise to objectionable conditions. Along the river front private sewers discharging directly into the river have also been constructed. The water supply of the village is derived from wells located along the northerly bank of the Croton river about 1,500 feet below the Croton Dam. The daily water consumption is about 150,000 gallons a day.

The population of the village in 1915 was 2,243 and the area of the village according to the report of the engineers is 406, so that the average density of population is about 5.5 persons per acre. The growth of the village has been moderate and based on an average density of 20 persons per acre it is estimated that the ultimate population to be served by the system as designed will be about 8,000 persons.

« PreviousContinue »