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As a result of this investigation it may be concluded:

1. That the regular water supply of Pleasantville is derived from a source which should furnish satisfactory water provided adequate precautions are at all times taken to protect the well from pollution.

2. That, however, the old reservoir is still retained as an auxiliary supply and should therefore be maintained in

a proper sanitary condition.

3. That inadequate storage is provided at times when it is necessary to clean the storage reservoir. In view of the above, I beg to offer the following recommendations to be acted upon by the village authorities :

1. That care be taken to at all times maintain adequate sanitary conditions in the vicinity of the well to prevent any possibility of pollution.

2. That if the old system is to be retained as an auxiliary supply, the watershed should be maintained in a sanitary condition by the enforcement of the rules and regulations protecting it and furthermore the filters should be ready for service at any time. If the old system is not to be retained the connection between it and the present system should be removed.

3. That consideration be given either to dividing the storage reservoir into two parts or providing additional storage in order to provide ade

quate fire protection at times of cleaning the reservoir. In conclusion, I would recommend that copies of this report be sent to the village officials and the sanitary supervisor of the district.

Respectfully submitted,
THEODORE HORTON,

Chief Engineer ALBANY, N. Y., March 6, 1917

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Odor, hot.
Odor, cold.
Turbidity.
Solids, total.
Loss on ignition.
Mineral residue.
Ammonia, free.
Ammonia, albuminoid.
Nitrites..
Nitrates.
Oxygen consumed.
Chlorine..
Hardness, total.
Alkalinity..
Bacteria per c.c..

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.016 .050 .002 0.24 1.00

3.75 174.2 103.0

20 0+30+3– 0+3

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B. coli type..

10 c.c.

1 c.c. 1/10 c.c.

Results are expressed in parts per million. + Present. Absent,

Abbreviations used to describe odors of water: 0, none; 1, very faint; 2, faint; 3, distinct; 4, decided; 5, strong; 6, very strong; a, aromatic; d, disagreeable; e, earthy; f, fishy; g, grassy; m, musty; y, vegetable.

PORT LEYDEN

HERBAYY M. BIGGS, MD., State Commissioner of Health :

I beg to submit the following report on an investigation of the public water supply of Port Leyden, made by Mr. C. M. Baker, assistant engineer, on October 25, 1916.

Port Leyden is an incorporated village of 753 inhabitants, located in Lewis county, on the Utica and Ogdensburg branch of the N. Y. C. railroad, 42 miles north of Utica. The village is located on the Black river. Private sewer systems, which discharge without treatment into the Black river, serve a part of the village, the rest of the houses being served by privies, cesspools, etc.

The water supply is owned by the municipality and is derived from the south and middle forks of Cold brook, a tributary to the Black river. Dams are constructed on each fork forming small impounding reservoirs, at practically the same elevation, from which the water flows by gravity to the village. Originally the water supply was derived from the south fork only. This supply was put into operation in 1897. In 1893, however, an additional supply was developed from the middle fork. About 90 per cent of the population is served with water, there being in all about 200 service taps, none of which are metered. There are some four miles of water mains, ranging in size from 4 to 10 inches in diameter. The pressure in the village averages about 85 pounds per square inch. Since there are no meters nor other method of measuring the water used, no definite information could be obtained regarding the consumption, but based upon a per capita rate of 100 gallons per day the daily consumption would be approximately 70,000 gallons.

The sources of the streams tributary to the supply are springs, which issue from the foot of steep banks of ravines. The dam's forming the impounding reservoirs mentioned above are located near the sources of the streams and are constructed of earth with concrete core walls. The capacity of each of the reservoirs is about 400,000 gallons. The tributary watershed to each supply is 14 or 15 acres in arca. Two and one-half acres in the vicinity of the old reservoir are owned by the village, the greater part of the remaining watershed being uninhabited wooded land, although a small portion is used for pasture land. All the watershed, 13.6 acres, tributary to the new supply, is owned by the village, and although not enclosed by a fence at the time of the inspection, the engineer was inforined that a fence is to be constructed. Consideration is also being given by the village authorities to the purchase of the remainder of the watershed tributary to the old supply. No insanitary conditions were observed on either of the watersheds at the time of the inspection, although as mentioned above, it is possible that pollution of animal origin at times finds its way into the old reservoir from the pasture land on the watershed.

Samples of the water were collected at the time of the inspection and sent to the Division of Laboratories and Research for analyses, the results of which, together with those of previous analyses, are recorded in the appended table.

The results of these analyses show a water satisfactory in physical qualities with respect to color and turbidity and also a water that is low in hardness. The figures for nitrogen in the form of free and albuminoid ammonia and nitrites are low, but those for nitrates and chlorine appear to be somewhat above normal. The bacterial counts are low except in a few cases, but colon bacilli are frequently present in 10 c.c. inoculations and occasionally in 1 c.c. inoculations, thus indicating the presence of active and potentially dangerous contamination. It is probable, however, that this pollution is of animal rather than human origin, and is probably caused by surface wash from pasture land finding its way into the old reservoir. The results of the analyses of samples collected at the time of the inspection show the presence of colon bacilli in the water collected from the old reservoir. Colon bacilli were also found present in the water collected from a tap in the village at this time. As a result of this investigation it may be concluded:

1. That the original water supply of Port Leyden is derived from a source which is subject to a small amount of pollution from pasture land on the watershed tributary to the reservoir.

2. That the new supply is derived from a source which if properly fenced and protected should furnish a satisfactory supply. In view of the above, I beg to offer the following recommendations, to be acted upon by the village authorities:

1. That steps be taken immediately to purchase the remainder of the watershed tributary to the south fork supply and that this area be enclosed by a substantially constructed fence.

2. That the proposed fence be constructed about the watershed of the new supply as soon as practicable.

Respectfully submitted,
THEODORE HORTON,

Chief Engineer ALBANY, N. Y., January 8, 1917

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RESULTS OF WATER ANALYSES
Abbreviations used to describe odors of water: 0, none; 1, very faint; 2, faint; 3, distinct; 4, decided; 5, strong; 6, very strong; a, aromatic;

d, disagreeable; e, earthy; f, fishy; g, grassy; m, musty; v, vegetable

PHYSICAL

CHEMICAL (Parts PER MILLION)

BACTERIOLOGICAL

ODOR

SOLIDS

NITROGEN A8

HARDNESS

B. COLI TYPE
+= PRESENT

ABBONT

Municipality

County

Source of sample

Date
of col-
lection

Oxygen consumed

Bacteria per c.c.; gelatin

20°, 48 hours

Color

Chlorine

Total

Alkalinity

10 C.C.

1 C.C.

1-10 c.c.

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50
95
300

90
150
110
800

20
750
240
350

70
120
240

Lewis.

1

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3,200

7003+0–10+3-10+3-
3000+3—10+3—0+3—
401+2-1+2-0+3–

0021.020).001 0.92 1.40

41.6

26.0

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PROSPECT (Chan-Glenn Spring)

HERMANN M. Biggs, M.D., State Commissioner of Health:

I beg to submit the following report on an investigation of the public water supply furnished by the Chan-Glenn Spring Company, commonly known as the Hodge & Dodge Supply, to a portion of the village of Prospect. An investigation was made of this supply by Mr. C. M. Baker, assistant engineer, on October 23, 1916.

Prospect is an incorporated village of 339 inhabitants, according to the 1915 census, located in Oneida county on the Uticą and Oneida branch of the N. Y. C. & H. R. railroad, about 18 miles north of the city of Utica. It is in a prosperous dairying district. No sewer system is provided in the village, the houses being served by privies, cesspools, etc.

The supply is derived from springs located about half a mile northwest of the village. The water is conducted from the springs into a collecting basin whence it flows by gravity to the consumers. The supply was put into operation about 1883. The owners of the supply are Messrs. Chancey B. Hodge and Glenn P. Dodge. About a third of the population of the village is served with water from this supply, there being in all 24 service taps, none of which are metered. The remainder of the village is served by another supply known as the Prospect Spring Supply. No definite information could be obiained regarding the consumption, but based upon a per capita rate of 100 gallons daily, the total consumption per day would be about 17,000 gallons. The pressure in the village is sufficient only for domestic purposes, no fire protection being provided. There are in all about three-fourths of a mile of mains which consist of 11/2 and 2 inch pipe.

The springs are located near the foot of a hill in a low swampy area. They are walled and covered with concrete and appeared to be satisfactorily protected from surface wash. From the springs the water flows by gravity into the collecting basin, which is about 6 feet square by 4 feet deep. This collecting basin is covered.

Samples of the water were collected at the time of the inspection and sent to the Division of Laboratories and Research for analyses, the results of which, together with those of previous analyses, are recorded in the appended table.

The results of these analyses show a water satisfactory in physical qualities with respect to color and turbidity, although quite high in hardness. The figures for nitrogen in the form of free and albuminoid ammonia and nitrites are low. Those for nitrates and chlorine, however, appear to be somewhat above normal, thus indicating that pollution has found its way into the ground water tributary to the supply. The bacterial counts are low in all cases and colon bacilli have in no case been found present, thus indicating the absence of active contamination.

As a result of this investigation it may be concluded that the water supply of the Chan-Glenn Spring Company is derived from a source which is well protected from pollution and that the water was of a satisfactory quality at the time of the inspection.

It seems necessary, therefore, to recommend at this time only that the owners of the supply continue their careful supervision in order that no insanitary conditions may exist which will in any way pollute the water.

Respectfully submitted,
THEODORE HORTON,

Chief Engineer ALBANY, N. Y., January 8, 1917

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